PDA

View Full Version : what do you think of my program


vaacutabove
11-13-2010, 09:14 PM
-February - March (Round 1)

Application of fertilizer w\preemergent herbicide. 1\4 lb. nitrogen per 1000 sq. ft. Stonewall, 30-0-0


-April - May (Round 2)

Application of fertilizer w\pre- and post emergent herbicide. 1/4 lb. N per 1000.
Stonewall, with Three-way broad leaf herbicide. 30-0-0

-June - July (Round 3)

Summer fertilizer. 5-0-20 w\10% iron for a dry season, 18-0-18 50%slow, 4% fe for wet.
Insect and disease control on an as need basis. Crosscheck (bifenthrin) for surface feeders,
Merit for grubs.

-August - October (Round 4)

high N fert. 30-0-0 (may go 46-0-0 Urea sprayable 100 lbs. per acre. (dissolve in water then add to tank)


24-0-11 in September, or if overseeding, starter fertilizer (18-24-12 or 14-20-4) Fescue seed rate
at 4 lbs. per 1000 sq. ft. for overseeding, 8 lbs. for bare soil.
Liquid: 30-0-0 @ 7 gal per acre.

October - November (Round 5)

46-0-0 Urea sprayable 100 lbs. per acre. (dissolve in water then add to tank)

November - December (Round 6)

Lime application. 10 lbs. per 1000 sq. ft. for maintenance, or higher amounts according to a soil test. Not to exceed 25 lbs. per 1000 in one application.

vaacutabove
11-14-2010, 05:44 PM
Nothing????

azjojo99
11-14-2010, 06:08 PM
What type(s) of grass?

ant
11-14-2010, 07:20 PM
what per m are u planing on using?
------------------------
-April - May (Round 2)

Application of fertilizer w\pre- and post emergent herbicide. 1/4 lb. N per 1000.
Stonewall, with Three-way broad leaf herbicide. 30-0-0
-----------------------
pre- and post emergent herbicide: liquid?

RigglePLC
11-14-2010, 08:51 PM
I am from the north. So take this with a grain of salt. It seems low in nitrogen to me. What grass species are you treating? How much nitrogen per year? How much of that is slow release? You need more slow-release. Are you trying to avoid quick-release weather nitrogen in hot weather to avoid increasing disease pressure? And if so, isn't it still very warm in September?
I don't see any weed control except in early spring. What about the summer annuals? What about the winter annuals? What about nutsedge? Do you need a separate program for irrigated lawns? Dif program for Bermuda?

Why apply liquid urea? It is quicker and therefore cheaper to apply as a dry product with a spreader. Equipment is cheap and more reliable. The only product you need to apply as a liquid is broadleaf herbicide. Just my Michigan point of view.

Hissing Cobra
11-14-2010, 11:36 PM
-February - March (Round 1)

Application of fertilizer w\preemergent herbicide. 1\4 lb. nitrogen per 1000 sq. ft. Stonewall, 30-0-0


-April - May (Round 2)

Application of fertilizer w\pre- and post emergent herbicide. 1/4 lb. N per 1000.
Stonewall, with Three-way broad leaf herbicide. 30-0-0

-June - July (Round 3)

Summer fertilizer. 5-0-20 w\10% iron for a dry season, 18-0-18 50%slow, 4% fe for wet.
Insect and disease control on an as need basis. Crosscheck (bifenthrin) for surface feeders,
Merit for grubs.

-August - October (Round 4)

high N fert. 30-0-0 (may go 46-0-0 Urea sprayable 100 lbs. per acre. (dissolve in water then add to tank)


24-0-11 in September, or if overseeding, starter fertilizer (18-24-12 or 14-20-4) Fescue seed rate
at 4 lbs. per 1000 sq. ft. for overseeding, 8 lbs. for bare soil.
Liquid: 30-0-0 @ 7 gal per acre.

October - November (Round 5)

46-0-0 Urea sprayable 100 lbs. per acre. (dissolve in water then add to tank)

November - December (Round 6)

Lime application. 10 lbs. per 1000 sq. ft. for maintenance, or higher amounts according to a soil test. Not to exceed 25 lbs. per 1000 in one application.

Without the type of turf you're treating, it's hard to give recommendations or insight for what you're looking for. Also, the way that you've got this listed, it seems to be confusing, especially the Step 4 August/October treatments.

It sounds to me like you're using liquids and possibly granular versions of fertilizer, is this true? Are they Lesco products? If so, is this program below the actual program?

Feb/Mar - Step 1 - 30-0-0 + Stonewall (Barricade)
Apr/May - Step 2 - 30-0-0 + Stonewall (Barricade) & Three Way Broadleaf Weed Herbicide.
Jun/Jul - Step 3 - 5-0-20 + 10% Iron (dry season) OR 18-0-18 + 4% Iron (wet season) + Bifenthrin & Imidicloprid.
Aug/Oct - Step 4 - 30-0-0 OR 46-0-0 OR 24-5-11 OR 18-24-12 Starter Fertilizer (September treatments)
Oct - Step 5 - 46-0-0
Nov/Dec - Step 6 - Lime @ 10lb./1,000 sq. ft.

Does this look like your program but in layman's terms? It sounds to me like you're using liquids and possibly granular versions, is this true? Are they Lesco products?

Let's break it down by application:

In Step 1, you'll be applying 30-0-0 + Stonewall (Barricade). This will be applied during the February or March timeframe and your plans include applying it at 1/4 lb. per 1,000 sq. ft.

Personally, I believe that your amount of Nitrogen isn't anywhere near where it should be to produce sufficient growth or to ward off fungus issues which are a near constant in the early part of the season. Also, applying these products in February or March when nothing is growing, could produce the wasting of fertilizer, runoff, and allow the pre-emergents to break down earlier in the season - when they're most needed. I know that in Massachusetts, this time of season is much too early for application and good results to take place. It could be different in Virginia and you'll have to find that out from talking to people in your area.

Also, if you're fertilizing cool seaon grasses (Kentucky Blue, Perennial Rye, Creeping Red Fescue), it is recommended that they be fertilized with 4.5 lbs - 5.5 lbs of Nitrogen per 1,000 sq. ft. per season. Thus, if you apply 1 lb per 1,000 sq. ft. with each application, you'll get by with five fertilizations and end up with 5 lbs. per 1,000 sq. ft. per season. If you're only applying it at 1/4 lb. per 1,000 sq. ft, you'll fall far short during each application, necessitating many more applications.

In Step 2, you want to use the same products (30-0-0 + Stonewall - Barricade) + 3-Way Herbicide. This will be applied in the April/May timeframe and your plans include applying it at 1/4 lb. per 1,000 sq. ft.

This seems fine to me but the application rate of 1/4 lb per 1,000 sq. feet will not give you the necessary results for growth or disease resistance that you'll be looking for. Your timeframe of April to May sounds just right, as that's when the weeds are poppin'!

In Step 3, you want to use the following: 5-0-20 + 10% Iron (dry season) OR 18-0-18 + 4% Iron (wet season) + Bifenthrin for surface insects & Imidicloprid (Merit) for Grubs

Your choice to use a variety of products for this application is somewhat confusing to me. If it were my program, I would stick to one type of product but because it's in the middle of the summer, I'd make sure that it had a sufficient amount of slow release (40% or higher) and that the Nitrogen be applied at the 1lb. per 1,000 sq. ft. rate. Your choices of 5-0-20 + 10% Iron (dry season) OR 18-0-18 + 4% Iron (wet season) + Bifenthrin for surface insects & Imidicloprid (Merit) for Grubs confuse me because I can't figure out if the Imidicloprid (Talstar/Crosscheck) or the Imidicloprid (Merit) is mixed with either of these products or if you have to apply them separately.

Why not use a granular Allectus 18-0-8 + 2% Iron (40% slow release) product on the properties where the customer wants the insect control and then use a granular fertilizer such as 28-0-12 + 3% Iron (50% slow release) or 24-5-11 on the other properties where the customers don't want insect control?

In Step 4, you want to apply 30-0-0 or 46-0-0 from August to October but if it's in September, you want to use 24-5-11 or 18-24-12 if seeding

Again, this is all confusing. Keep it simple! I would go with the granular 28-0-12 + 3% Iron or the aforementioned 24-5-11 for all lawns during this time, or the 18-24-12 if seeding is to be done. If granulars aren't your thing, liquids could be used but again, I recommend that the Nitrogen be applied at the 1lb. per 1,000 sq. ft rate and I would recommend a slow release of 40% or more, regardless of which fertilizer you choose to use.

In Step 5, you want to use 46-0-0 and this will be applied in October

I don't see anything wrong with this application but there is no Potassium present in the mix, which is crucial to root development.

In Step 6, you want to apply lime at 10lb per 1,000 sq. ft. and you want to apply it during the November/December timeframe

This seems fine but keep in mind that 10 lbs. per 1,000 sq. ft. may not be enough to even maintain the P.H. Level within the soil. A soil test should be done at the customer's expense to determine correct amounts and then pricing should change to profit from a correct application.

I think you're on the right track, I just think that you may have to change your first application date to suit your area and from there, space your applications at 6 week intervals. Try to keep your Nitrogen levels at 1lb. per 1,000 sq. ft. so that you'll hit the recommended 4.5 - 5.5 lbs. of Nitrogen per 1,000 sq. ft. per season (again, this is only for cool season turf). More importantly, keep it streamlined and simple!

vaacutabove
11-15-2010, 10:45 AM
thanks cobra this is kinda what I was looking for. I am looking at lesco products. calling agrium today see what they have we have a distrabution center in the city since royster clark burned down (that was a hell of a night at the firedept). what is the most coat effective way to get that much N. I am treating fescue.

Hissing Cobra
11-15-2010, 08:27 PM
Well, power is in the numbers. You should know how much sq. ft. you'll do each round (easy, add up the sq. footage from all of your lawns). From this number, you will be able to determine how many bags that you'll need to complete each round by reading the labels and seeing how much sq. footage each bag will cover at the recommended rates. Some bags cover more distances, thus the purchasing of less bags. You'll need to negotiate your pricing based on the amount you'll need. John Deere Landscapes has price breaks depending on how much you will actually purchase. For instance, if you buy 1 bag to 39 bags, the price will be $xx.xx per bag. If you buy 40 bags to 79 bags, your price should be lower at $xx.xx per bag. If you buy 80 to 360 bags, it'll be even lower at $xx.xx per bag.

When purchasing fertilizer, it's not always the best thing to go with the cheapest stuff. Certain times per year, you may want to go with products that have slow releasing properties or Iron mixed into them. These products will be more expensive than fertilizers such as 46-0-0 because they have other ingredients. It's not COST PER BAG that you should be concerned about as much as COST PER 1,000 SQ. FT. As I said, sometimes it's cheaper to go with the more expensive stuff because it may cover more sq. ft. per bag, thus less bags will need to be bought. You'll have to weigh all of this out when making comparisons. Also, when comparing prices, definitely factor the weight of each bag. Big box stores usually sell their products in 40, 42, 48, or 50 pound bags, vs. Lesco, which sells everything in 50 lb. bags. It's virtually impossible to compare bag price vs. cost per 1,000 sq. ft.

Also, many combination products such as Fertilizer combined with Dimension or Fertilizer combined with Merit, are actually cheaper if you buy them already mixed together. Some of them are actually cheaper than straight fertilizer by itself!

Good luck!