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onebreezer
11-16-2010, 08:09 AM
I am looking for a gauge to measure rate of flow for a lesco skid sprayer. We think we are using too much volume on aps. I know that we can measure with a bucked and a timer. But can anyone recommend a flow meter?

Ric
11-16-2010, 09:13 AM
I am looking for a gauge to measure rate of flow for a lesco skid sprayer. We think we are using too much volume on aps. I know that we can measure with a bucked and a timer. But can anyone recommend a flow meter?

Onebreezer

A flow meter is the last thing you need for calibration. A measuring wheel, Stop Watch, Graduated measuring device, and the ability to do 6th grade math is all you need. You must be lacky the last item.

onebreezer
11-16-2010, 09:22 AM
That's why I rarely post a question. I posted that I understand I can run water into a five gal bucket and time it, do the math and calculate. However a flow gauge will do it and constantly, accuratly measure flow. Does anyone have any productive advice.

Ric
11-16-2010, 09:28 AM
That's why I rarely post a question. I posted that I understand I can run water into a five gal bucket and time it, do the math and calculate. However a flow gauge will do it and constantly, accuratly measure flow. Does anyone have any productive advice.

onebreezer

Since no one else in our industry uses or calibrates with a Flow Meter you must of come up with something new. I suggest you patent the idea and get a university grant to promote the use of Flow meters.

In Edit:

I used to teach Materials Calculations at a Florida State College so I would like to think I know what I am talking about.

onebreezer
11-16-2010, 09:36 AM
Ok I see that Lesco makes a flow gauge for thier sprayers. I'll give my local guys a call when they open. Personal attacks ie. lack 6th grade education is unprofessional. Either give advise or shut up.

Neal Wolbert
11-17-2010, 01:14 AM
Ric makes sense, even if you don't like the way he communicates. If you find a flow meter that works well, you'd be wise to make sure it's correct which means you will have to "bucket" test it anyway. The tried and true method is pretty tried and true, I recommend you use that method. The most reliable flow meter I know of costs about $1500. Even at that price, maybe especially at that price, I'll bet you would still want to "bucket" test it to varify it's accuracy.

Neal

cgaengineer
11-17-2010, 08:08 AM
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200322245_200322245

Here is the one I was planning on getting. I wanted mine for filling my tank accurately no matter how my truck was parked.

NattyLawn
11-17-2010, 12:34 PM
What's wrong with having a flow meter? I'd rather rely on that than looking at the numbers on a 300 gallon tank or on the PG, or my backpack sprayer. Good units are expensive, but they will hold up over time if they're serviced and taken care of.

I use them for gpm and volume. For gpm it's not an exact science like Ric mentioned, but it's an easy adjustment on the pump. You can have the stopwatch, measuring wheel, measuring device and your 6th grade math. It's an easy adjustment on the fly with the meter.

cgaengineer
11-17-2010, 12:46 PM
What's wrong with having a flow meter? I'd rather rely on that than looking at the numbers on a 300 gallon tank or on the PG, or my backpack sprayer. Good units are expensive, but they will hold up over time if they're serviced and taken care of.

I use them for gpm and volume. For gpm it's not an exact science like Ric mentioned, but it's an easy adjustment on the pump. You can have the stopwatch, measuring wheel, measuring device and your 6th grade math. It's an easy adjustment on the fly with the meter.

I agree. Anyway I can make my work easier and more accurate I am all for it.
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Pumptecguy
11-17-2010, 06:19 PM
Onebreezer:

Great Plains Industries (GPI) makes one that many folks use. It should work well for you. Make sure you install it near the gun so you can see what you are putting out. You will need to determine if the pressure or chemicals will damage this meter, however.

The bucket test is great, but with so many variables in a pumping set-up (throttle settings, hose kinks, etc...) it makes sense to have a meter nearby to monitor output. You of course will need to qualify the meter with the bucket test and adjust accordingly.

I hope this helps you.

Ric
11-17-2010, 06:40 PM
Ric makes sense, even if you don't like the way he communicates. If you find a flow meter that works well, you'd be wise to make sure it's correct which means you will have to "bucket" test it anyway. The tried and true method is pretty tried and true, I recommend you use that method. The most reliable flow meter I know of costs about $1500. Even at that price, maybe especially at that price, I'll bet you would still want to "bucket" test it to varify it's accuracy.

Neal

Neal

That is the younger generation for you. They have had it so easy with calculators and computers that they don't know how to think things through and do 6th grade math. I taught a class called "Materials Calculation" when in fact all I did was teach 6th grade math to adults. What ever you do, don't give the odd change to a teenager running a cash registar after they punched in the amount paid and have a total change amount in front of them. They will never figured out the correct change to return.

cgaengineer
11-17-2010, 06:46 PM
Neal

That is the younger generation for you. They have had it so easy with calculators and computers that they don't know how to think things through and do 6th grade math. I taught a class called "Materials Calculation" when in fact all I did was teach 6th grade math to adults. What ever you do, don't give the odd change to a teenager running a cash registar after they punched in the amount paid and have a total change amount in front of them. They will never figured out the correct change to return.

You are just stubborn Ric. Like Nik said, you will still have to calibrate it with a bucket, but once its set you are golden. I can't see why you would be so against something that would make a persons herbicide application almost 100% accurate as far as the ratio is concerned. I don't know, but I'm guessing a graduated tank could be off as much as 5-10 percent...not a lot in the grand scheme of things, but couple that with a spraying accuracy of 90% and you could be off as much as 20%.
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Ric
11-17-2010, 07:28 PM
You are just stubborn Ric. Like Nik said, you will still have to calibrate it with a bucket, but once its set you are golden. I can't see why you would be so against something that would make a persons herbicide application almost 100% accurate as far as the ratio is concerned. I don't know, but I'm guessing a graduated tank could be off as much as 5-10 percent...not a lot in the grand scheme of things, but couple that with a spraying accuracy of 90% and you could be off as much as 20%.
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CGA

I am not stubborn you guys are just plan lazy or not thinking. If you know the area being treated in sq ft and have a sight tube or tank marking, that is all you need. Check the volume in your tank before spraying and then check it after you finish spraying and subtract the final reading from the starting reading to find the volume used. Now Divided the Volume by Sq Ft to find how mach volume was used per sq ft or per 1000 sq ft if you divided by thousand Sq ft sprayed. Hello this is simple enough to do and can be checked on every yard you spray with no special equipment

To check flow per minute just measure how much product is sprayed in a Minute.

Now I am sorry but you can't watch a Flow Meter and see where you are spraying at the same time. Man has not developed dual eye sight like some insects. But you can watch your spray pattern and judge if you are applying a even pattern.

In an other thread we are talking about profit margin and the value of reporting profit correctly. A flow meter is a expensive and very unnecessary item that won't help your quality or profit.

cgaengineer
11-17-2010, 07:32 PM
Oh, btw, my math was off...combined would not equal 20%.
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Ric
11-17-2010, 07:46 PM
Oh, btw, my math was off...combined would not equal 20%.
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CGA

No you would be only 10% off and that is in fact very acceptable and accounted for by the manufacture when writing Labels rates. No matter how much equipment you use, the Human factor comes in and there is no way you can apply the exact amount of spray.

cgaengineer
11-17-2010, 08:07 PM
CGA

No you would be only 10% off and that is in fact very acceptable and accounted for by the manufacture when writing Labels rates. No matter how much equipment you use, the Human factor comes in and there is no way you can apply the exact amount of spray.

I have checked myself and I am at 5-10% which I think is pretty good.
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Ric
11-17-2010, 08:34 PM
I have checked myself and I am at 5-10% which I think is pretty good.
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CGA

And you are doing that WITHOUT a FLOW METER on the end of your hose where it get in the way.

Leaf Jockey
11-17-2010, 08:59 PM
CGA

Now I am sorry but you can't watch a Flow Meter and see where you are spraying at the same time. Man has not developed dual eye sight like some insects. But you can watch your spray pattern and judge if you are applying a even pattern.



Come on, thats like saying you can't look at a speedometer while driving a car. The last sprayer I used had six flow meters. One for each pair of jets. They were nothing to calibrate with but just a quick indicator of a clogged jet. I didn't trust the speedometer either. It was used as a reference point once calibration was done the coventional way with 6th grade math.

Scott

cgaengineer
11-17-2010, 08:59 PM
CGA

And you are doing that WITHOUT a FLOW METER on the end of your hose where it get in the way.

I wanted flow meter for filling only.
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ted putnam
11-17-2010, 09:07 PM
CGA

No you would be only 10% off and that is in fact very acceptable and accounted for by the manufacture when writing Labels rates. No matter how much equipment you use, the Human factor comes in and there is no way you can apply the exact amount of spray.

If you just have to spend hundreds of dollars, then so be it...but. The bold statement rings very true. A flow meter would be necessary in a low volume spraying situation where precise calibration is a must. ie Large AG operations. Other than that, a flow meter would be nice to have if you suspect that a tank doesn't have the capacity you thought. A bucket check is more than enough in most other cases. This isn't rocket science. If you are spraying lawns with a hose and gun and you've done your bucket check and it's close and you're still spraying heavy then you need to(and I don't want to sound harsh) "Get the Lead Out!". Check your use against area covered through the day. JMO

Ric
11-17-2010, 09:10 PM
Come on, thats like saying you can't look at a speedometer while driving a car. The last sprayer I used had six flow meters. One for each pair of jets. They were nothing to calibrate with but just a quick indicator of a clogged jet. I didn't trust the speedometer either. It was used as a reference point once calibration was done the coventional way with 6th grade math.

Scott

Scott

I have no problem with the way you are using Flow meters because you are talking about a boom sprayer. I want All the help I can get when dealing with booms. If I can't watch the nozzles then I want something to watch them for me. But if you have 6 flow meters on one rig, you are talking money. I am willing to bet your sprayer is not the average Yard Boy model.