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View Full Version : What is a good type ground cover?


jhouchins
12-29-2010, 08:11 PM
I have a customer that has a very steep hill right behind there house and they hate mowing it and they want some type of ground cover. What are some good types of ground cover that help with erosion as well.

Live in East Tn(climate), area gets little sun light because of big trees.

Thanks guys

Green Acres Lawn CAre
12-29-2010, 08:26 PM
What about some type of ivy?

jhouchins
12-29-2010, 08:46 PM
What about some type of ivy?

I was thinking that as well. Thought about some monkey grass possibly and some mulch but they don't want to have to mulch every year.

Green Acres Lawn CAre
12-29-2010, 08:53 PM
Jasmine would also be pretty good then there would be no need for mulch.

avguy
12-29-2010, 09:25 PM
pachysandra

TScapes
12-30-2010, 01:57 PM
[QUOTE=jhouchins;3839257]I have a customer that has a very steep hill right behind there house and they hate mowing it and they want some type of ground cover. What are some good types of ground cover that help with erosion as well.

Live in East Tn(climate), area gets little sun light because of big trees.
/QUOTE]

What about water?

Ivy is easy and aggressive, especially after 3 years! Juniper works, but you can have disease and insect issues. Big Blue Liriope is great and aggressive!

What about incorporating all or some of these things? Some Ornamental Grasses (in groups of 1 or 3's), some liriope, ivy and even some grey owl or low junipers? Possibly sink some bolders for texture.....? Lots of options! You can even do azaleas in small groupings.

thewall
12-30-2010, 03:21 PM
Try Vinca Major,Cotoneaster coral beauty or lonicera pilata all very fast growing and like the shade

Patriot Services
12-30-2010, 03:40 PM
Asiatic Jasmine. Grows fast in any condition. Immune to roundup so even if weeds poke up they easily zapped. Cheapest way is prob buying washed plantings online. 1 qt size usually run 3-5 bucks.
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Lefet
12-30-2010, 03:43 PM
Asiatic Jasmine. Grows fast in any condition. Immune to roundup so even if weeds poke up they easily zapped. Cheapest way is prob buying washed plantings online. 1 qt size usually run 3-5 bucks.
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what is "washed plantings"?

Great thread by the way, we have a client that has the same problem.

Patriot Services
12-30-2010, 03:47 PM
They just remove the dirt and wrap in wet paper for shipping. They cost less than a buck each vs a qt pot of dirt.
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Lefet
12-30-2010, 03:49 PM
Thanks Patriot Services!!

gunsnroses
12-30-2010, 04:12 PM
Check out crown vetch, can be invasive in the wrong place though. Look around....some have nice flower color

Maco Services
12-30-2010, 06:18 PM
Ive got similar issue right now. Customer has erosion issues, have had multiple people try to sod a shaded hill with bermuda, great.....

Mine is an eroded hill, partially covered by trees and shade. The last person had a good idea, in planting juniper, but it isn't spreading at all,I'd guess due to the shade. We are dealing with a fence at the top of this hill, and I'd rather not do ivy as it may take over the fence, trees, and create a new maintenance headache. I'd prefer low maintenance, not a vine, green all year, and if it flowers, even better.

I hope I'm not taking over the original post, but I'm in Alabama, so we have similar situations and environmental contraints. Great topic!

Patriot Services
12-30-2010, 06:31 PM
The Jasmine will weave itself into a tight mat just like erosion control netting. Shade, sun, tree roots, nothing much seems to phase it. Easy to plant and maintain.
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Lefet
12-30-2010, 06:34 PM
The Jasmine will weave itself into a tight mat just like erosion control netting. Shade, sun, tree roots, nothing much seems to phase it. Easy to plant and maintain.
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I kind of like that. My client has LARGE areas, and memory serves me correctly this is the one that's immune to R/U? My clients had a weed problem we couldn't seem to get rid of. Actually couldn't even identify it. I've got some pictures but they were in the middle of the heat wave, not sure they'd do much good.

Patriot Services
12-30-2010, 06:38 PM
Yes, I keep a sprayer of 1% and just spray right over the top. Once it is spread you prob won't even see a weed. It gets that dense.
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jhouchins
12-30-2010, 08:22 PM
Thanks fellas. Looking at some vinca and ivy with some ornamental grasses in there. Love this site, so much knowledge.

Patriot Services
01-02-2011, 04:04 PM
I know it might seem obvious. Your local library probably has an entire row of books related to this business.
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jhouchins
01-02-2011, 08:10 PM
I know it might seem obvious. Your local library probably has an entire row of books related to this business.
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Thanks for the info

44DCNF
01-02-2011, 10:43 PM
how about lamiastrum (yellow archangel). fast growing and should cover the area quickly. It will take some maintenance keeping it confined but it's certainly manageable.

Maco Services
01-25-2011, 02:13 PM
Maybe it's an unusual variety, but the Jasmine that is there now is puny, and has never done much of anything on the shady hillside.

Everyone loves pictures. See what I mean here, shady hillside. Previous LC threw some pinestraw on it, which washes down into the parking lot. The one before that tried to sod it, which died. One before that said it needed fertilization. It's rocky, clay with some errosion issues. Even if we have to drill holes, refill with amended soil and clay mixture, we just need something that will do well here and keep the soil stable without running up the fenceline and into the trees at an agressive vine may do.

Barrett Landscaping
01-25-2011, 05:03 PM
i would say that english ivy and pacasandra for the less sloped parts if any would be your best bet.

StihlMechanic
01-25-2011, 05:04 PM
Mondo Grass or asian jasmine would be my choice.

Patriot Services
01-25-2011, 05:38 PM
Well staked down landscape netting and Asian Jasmine planted with tight spacing.
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Lawn RX 10
01-25-2011, 06:26 PM
Why not a juniper? Maybe someone said it already, or maybe the crawling juniper has a weak root system? I dont know, just sounds and seems like it would look sharp their. some kind of bunker blanket could hold some mulch i bet.

Maco Services
01-25-2011, 11:12 PM
Sorry, I misspoke, I said jasmine, I meant juniper. There is juniper planted in small amounts on the hillside already, it just hasn't grown at all in the 3 years since it's been there. I agree, I think a wall of green anything here would look great. Would jasmine grow up the fence line(that's a bad thing here). ?

Juniper would be perfect but my suspicion is this wall gets quite a bit of shade and likely holds very little moisture.
Is some sort of planting, mulch on top, with a retaining net or cloth of somesort the only way to get this stuff to thrive? I don't want to disappoint the customer, they've tried a handful of options and want to give them a reasonable solution with a high probability of success

Thank you for the replies. I appreciate the help and opinions.
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