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Barefoot James
01-03-2011, 11:16 PM
Looking at a 2005 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 Dually 2 WD
6.6 Liter Duramax Diesel with Allison Automatic Transmission
Work Interior includes manual window and locks, Vinyl floor and seating with front bench
AM/FM Radio, Air Conditioning, Cruise
With 9.6 ft DUMP BED and 2 ft cargo/tool holder behind cab (in front of dump)
Dump has nice sides (heavy guage - see through and nylon roll top to keep load from blowing out) and truck is in really good shape with about 80K miles - (one owner - did brick and stone work)
Questions is this a good truck? Feedback please. MPG loaded - Hwy unloaded? What will it haul (weight)?. I will be hauling just mulch or compost so I doubt I will max it out but curious? I would think it would pull 15,000 lbs easy? what something like this worth?
No pics available just looking for your feedback on this model truck.

360ci
01-05-2011, 05:35 PM
With the dump bed installed you'd look at an easy 4000lb payload. That's with the thinking that the dump bed is a good 1000-1200lbs. Check the body upfit sticker in the drivers door jamb area for GVWR and other details.

Considering you'll drive to a place loaded and come back empty I'd estimate mileage depending on any highway speed, at 14mpg overall.

I couldn't tell you what it's worth, you'd have to check out the market in your area or local Auto Trader to find trucks of similar year, mileage and upfit to compare it to.

I'm not positive on this, but I believe the max trailer weight with conventional towing is 12,500lbs on the HD trucks. Newer ones are up around the 15K mark due to increase in frame strength. However, it could be possible.

With average moisture content a cubic yard of mulch is only 600-800lbs. After a rain, well, that can go up to about 1000lbs. With your setup you should be able to squeeze in 2.5-3 cubic yards without having to worry about product blowing out.

Barefoot James
01-07-2011, 11:51 AM
Thanks 360.

The dealer says I should be able to haul 3 tons and it has 4 ft steel diamond sides and a pull over tarp - So I should be able to get in 8 yards of mulch?? 63 sq ft x 4 ft sides = 252 cu ft/27 cuft (sq yard) = 9 cu yard But @ 800 lbs a yard this would be over weight so 8 yards. Is this correct?

Anyways they say the legal load pull limit is around 12,000 pounds but it would easily pull 20,000 - LOL would never need more than the 12K would be great for me as the truck I'm using new is rated at 5K pull load - only have a 6 cyl. So I'm for sure getting this truck should be great for our business!

Any other inputs here would be appreciated:)

360ci
01-07-2011, 12:02 PM
Thanks 360.

The dealer says I should be able to haul 3 tons and it has 4 ft steel diamond sides and a pull over tarp - So I should be able to get in 8 yards of mulch?? 63 sq ft x 4 ft sides = 252 cu ft/27 cuft (sq yard) = 9 cu yard But @ 800 lbs a yard this would be over weight so 8 yards. Is this correct?

Anyways they say the legal load pull limit is around 12,000 pounds but it would easily pull 20,000 - LOL would never need more than the 12K would be great for me as the truck I'm using new is rated at 5K pull load - only have a 6 cyl. So I'm for sure getting this truck should be great for our business!

Any other inputs here would be appreciated:)

You might be able to squeeze in 8 yards. Just don't go to high unless you plan to drive through the city to minimize product blow out. If you take the box off and put a 5th wheel hitch, you can tow close to 20K. Conventional towing at 12K sounds right with pintle hook.

If you stay in town for mulch transport the DOT shouldn't cause you problems if you run overweight, as they won't know unless you get called to scale the vehicle; generally found on interstates.

If you deliver topsoil and such, then you'd be at capacity around 2 yards depending on moisture content (if it's mud, perhaps 1 yard!), as topsoil can easily be 2000lbs a yard. I can't imagine any light commercial or residential clients for that matter needing more than 8 yards of mulch, so it should be a good buy for the long term.

STIHL GUY
01-07-2011, 12:30 PM
With your setup you should be able to squeeze in 2.5-3 cubic yards without having to worry about product blowing out.

i built wood sides for my 2500HD and i can haul 5 yds of mulch in it

360ci
01-07-2011, 01:14 PM
I use my 4x8 utility trailer with 2.5' high sides for mulch. It holds 2 cubic yards of mulch with a tarp over top. Some days I find myself wanting for a larger capacity, but for now, it works.

Gravel Rat
01-07-2011, 02:44 PM
Your legal payload will be 3500lbs, a regular 1 ton dump doesn't have that much payload, your empty weight probably is around 8800lbs you may be a little less.

A 1 ton truck runs out of braking power the biggest problem with them.

Barefoot James
01-07-2011, 07:29 PM
Your legal payload will be 3500lbs, a regular 1 ton dump doesn't have that much payload, your empty weight probably is around 8800lbs you may be a little less.

A 1 ton truck runs out of braking power the biggest problem with them.
Legal? If the truck is GVW say 20,000 lbs cause it for sure can pull that and the dealer says it hauls 3 tons (6,000 lbs) this is still well under the 20,000 lbs + (if possible) plate I will have? I should be well under - legal. Keep in mind this truck has dully's

Gravel Rat
01-07-2011, 08:17 PM
Legal? If the truck is GVW say 20,000 lbs cause it for sure can pull that and the dealer says it hauls 3 tons (6,000 lbs) this is still well under the 20,000 lbs + (if possible) plate I will have? I should be well under - legal. Keep in mind this truck has dully's

You can gross 20,000lbs pulling a trailer that is the weight of truck and trailer there is no way you can gross the truck itself to 20,000lbs there won't be much left of the tires :laugh:

A regular 1 ton with 3 tons on it is maxed out you don't want to put anymore weight on it.

Barefoot James
01-07-2011, 09:09 PM
You can gross 20,000lbs pulling a trailer that is the weight of truck and trailer there is no way you can gross the truck itself to 20,000lbs there won't be much left of the tires :laugh:

A regular 1 ton with 3 tons on it is maxed out you don't want to put anymore weight on it.
I'm not going to put 3 tons on it AND pull 20,000 lbs - either/or. I'm saying I can put 3 tons on the dump part or pull LOTS of weight. I would stick with the guidelines which I'm sure are in the carry 3 tons on the dump range OR pull 12,000 lbs range - one or the other - noth both combined.

Input appreciated here.
The only reason I mentioned the 20,000 lbs pulling weight is cause the dealer said he knows for a fact this truck - CAN DO IT. This does not make it legal, but it can do it if needed. Does that/this make sense?

Need to know - this is why I have this thread going - looking for input.

360ci
01-08-2011, 12:56 AM
First thing - don't always believe dealers. You can do this math yourself, or call another dealer and get them to run your VIN, and forward you the specs so you know for sure.

Also, I don't think I mentioned it but 2000lbs = 1 ton. A 4500 truck can haul 3 tons and a bit more, but a 3500 has an absolute max of no more than 3 tons. Take 3 tons, or 6000lbs, and subtract the weight of the driver, fuel, weight of the dump bed (say 1000lbs), and any other aftermarket equipment such as pintle hitch, spare tire (generally an option on one tons, so another 75lbs) and usable payload is roughly 2 tons, or slightly less. That would equate to around 5 perhaps 6 yards of mulch with a lower than usual moisture content, or 4 yards with a higher moisture content.

hosejockey2002
01-08-2011, 02:01 AM
A dealer would tell you that a pig could fly by flapping it's ears if they thought it would get you to buy a truck. A 1 ton diesel with a dump bed weighs 8500-9000 pounds empty, GVWR is 12,000, do the math. GCWR is around 20-22K, I can't remember which. That is the maximum weight of truck AND trailer combined. Again, simple math, you're not going to be able to tow 20,000 lbs. Like other guys have said, 12K towing is about right, maybe a little more.

360ci
01-08-2011, 02:13 AM
A dealer would tell you that a pig could fly by flapping it's ears if they thought it would get you to buy a truck. A 1 ton diesel with a dump bed weighs 8500-9000 pounds empty, GVWR is 12,000, do the math. GCWR is around 20-22K, I can't remember which. That is the maximum weight of truck AND trailer combined. Again, simple math, you're not going to be able to tow 20,000 lbs. Like other guys have said, 12K towing is about right, maybe a little more.

I concur... be sure to verify weights with the sticker in the door jamb. Aftermarket body installers have to have their own sticker or plate attached with adjusted weights.

meador56
01-09-2011, 05:51 PM
I tow my dump trailer constantly with 6 tons of gravel grossing 23000. I use a 2000 GMC 3500 with a 7.4 and 5 spd with no problems. I used to have a small dozer that weighed 17000 that I pulled without any problems. I know this is above rated limits but if you respect the weight and use a little common sense you should have no troubles. Stay away from the DOT and if you are towing this every day buy A BIGGER TRUCK.

360ci
01-09-2011, 09:33 PM
Even the class 8 guys run overweight from time to time. Most of the time it's not on purpose, but 'close' to being on par. If this is the case and they act stupid they might get no fine, or a small one.

Just don't run overweight and get into an accident. Even if it ain't your fault, you were running illegal, and it's your rear end on the line!