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JimLewis
01-13-2011, 04:34 AM
To date we've always mowed all of our lawns with 21" Hondas. Mostly all fairly small lawns here in the urban areas we work in. But now with about 250 accounts, there are a handfull where we could actually use a larger mower. So we're going to invest in a 36" this year.

I don't care so much whether it has a ZTR capability or not. Don't care if it has a skid plate to ride on behind.

My main concerns are;


Which brand have you had the best experience with?
Which brand cuts wet grass the best?


Thanks in advance for your replies....

Bogielski
01-13-2011, 09:32 AM
I have a 36'' Exmark Turf Tracer HP w/ a sand-on. Works great, alot of horse power and never boggs down, even in 8 inch grass when we are cutting at 3 inches. Btw, you shouldn't cut in wet grass, One its bad for the plant, Two its bad on the machine extra stress on the motor and you will replace the blades non stop.

lawnboy dan
01-13-2011, 09:57 AM
i go tru wheel belts fast if i cut wet grass on my toro. consider a hydro

MarcSmith
01-13-2011, 10:48 AM
no harm comes to the plant by cutting it wet... more harm come by cutting 5" off a healthy lawn... If you are going to cut wet grass a lot then get as much power as you can afford. the clumping grass will make your mower work harder...as the grass will build up under the deck. Don't even think of bagging or mulching...Plan on spending more time to rake/blow clumps and more time to blow or sweep hard surfaces

if the ground is really saturated then you may rut the yard and you run the risk of tire marks when you turn in the soft soil.

I would not consider using a velke, or a slide on a W/B thats being used on really wet yard. more potential for ruts.

We have a fixed deck scag 36" hydro. works great. never used it in a full on down pour...but in damp spring heavy growth times...it does the job.

also don't plan on getting as nice of a cut when the grass is wet. the mower won't cut as even as it not able to get the grass to "stand up" as well with vaccum effect of the blades..

ShooterK2
01-13-2011, 02:40 PM
I'm pretty sure that, where Jim lives, it rains a LOT. So his equipment has to be able to do a good job in the wet stuff. Always mowing when it's dry would probably not be an option.

I have limited experience with this, but I'll tell you what I know. As I'm sure you know, you have two major options with walk-behinds: Belt driven or hydro driven. I own one of each. I got the belt drive (Scag 36") first and used it for most of last year. It cuts great wet or dry, so that was never an issue. What was an issue for me was the lack of reverse, and the controls. I had the pistol grip model, which works great and is optimal at keeping a straight line. It does, however, make my hands, wrists, and forearms hurt. Usually the next morning. I'm not talking fatigue, as in muscle soreness. I'm talking pain, and the inability to close a fist for the first hour after I wake up. I'm sure not everyone is affected this way, but I never was before I used this mower, and haven't been since. Other types of controls are available and may be better.

I bought my hydro unit (Bob-cat 36") near the end of last season, so I have less than 20 hours behind it. It too cuts great wet or dry. Both machines have plenty of power for cutting thick, wet Bermuda (or anything else we have here) without bogging. The hydro I got has "Z Controls", which are just like a ZTR has, and are very easy on the hands. Took some getting used to, but in time I learned to hold a straight line, and had no more pain from mowing all day. Since you are not interested in a machine that will "zero turn", then I wouldn't let that be a factor. The hydro, however, will do this without tearing turf, whereas the belt drive will leave a divot where one wheel was not spinning as the machine pivots around on that wheel. But, as I said, if you do not need zero turn capabilities, then this shouldn't be an issue.

Belt drives are available considerably cheaper than hydro units, and are very reliable.

One more thing to consider is belt slippage you go the belt drive route. Some folks say the belts slip, making the machine unusable in wet grass or rain. I, however, have mowed several times in rain, and regularly in wet grass with my Scag, and never had this problem.

Also, reverse on a belt driven machine is almost non-existant on anything other than a hard surface. Sure, there's a gear labeled "reverse", but try using it to back up in thick grass or on a slight incline.........better be feeling strong. You'll be much more tired by the end of the day with a belt-drive.

I hope this helps.

Valk
01-13-2011, 03:02 PM
Though I run a BOP Quickie 32, I've found Oregon's single-notch blades to pack my deck less when conditions are moist/wet. I theorize that the clippings are re-cut by the notch(es) and discharged sooner......rather than being mashed/juiced by a hi-lift blade with a solid wing/sail where the clippings seemingly get stickier, and remain longer in the turbulence, as well as remaining longer in length.

There's really only a few variables that one can control, right? Blade choice has proven to be the most versatile variable (for me). When conditions are more moist than the usual morning dew, I've found that decreasing engine/blade rpm's (by 1/4-1/3??) which also reduces forward speed will sometimes have a positive influence as well. Of course, all this depends on the type of & how much grass is being cut. I've also found some leaves/leaf piles mulch more effectively at slower blade speeds.
YMMV

JimLewis
01-13-2011, 03:15 PM
Btw, you shouldn't cut in wet grass, One its bad for the plant, Two its bad on the machine extra stress on the motor and you will replace the blades non stop.

LOL. Tell that to God and Mother Nature. If we couldn't cut when grass everyone would have to wait until just the middle of summer to mow their lawns around here. Not an option. Mowing wet grass is just part of regular business around here.

mslawn
01-13-2011, 08:37 PM
As long as you do not run a mulch kit a 36" turf tracer should do quite well in those conditions. With a mulch kit ours leaves stringers and you have to double cut. The 34 phazer we have cuts the same way as the turf tracer,but I would NOT recommend the Phazer to anyone, I can't stand that machine. A walkbehind is a much better fit when working with the narrow machines. I just bought a new hydro Viking today and hopefully it will do better with a mulch kit on it and not leave all the stringers that the other 2 do.

lifetree
01-13-2011, 09:44 PM
I have a 36" fixed deck, dual hydro machine ... Gravely / Lesco / Everride ... you might consider that for virtual cutting in almost constant wet conditions !!

Knight511
01-13-2011, 09:54 PM
[QUOTE=ShooterK2;3855070I'm not talking fatigue, as in muscle soreness. I'm talking pain, and the inability to close a fist for the first hour after I wake up. I'm sure not everyone is affected this way, but I never was before I used this mower, and haven't been since. Other types of controls are available and may be better. [/QUOTE]

Off topic, but that is called tendinitis. Much like plantar fasciitis. This type of pain is why I started a thread asking for input on mowers... only my pain is so great that I cannot pick anything up (even a glass of water) after I have really overcooked it. IMHO, for your longevity, get rid of the pistol grips and start using your hydro... your body will thank you!

Now back on topic....

lifetree
01-13-2011, 10:10 PM
... for your longevity, get rid of the pistol grips and start using your hydro ... your body will thank you ! ...

I agree, this is why I swapped my belt drive machines for hydro drive machines with loop handle controls !!

Bogielski
01-13-2011, 11:06 PM
I see your location now, Where we live / mow, its considerably dry except during hurricane season. We haven't had a good season with plenty of rain in a few years. Normally by the middle of the season everything is brown if the homeowners do not water. And my comment about the 8'' tall grass, we get alot of people that only want it cut once a month due to their money situation. little do they know it would cost the same if they had me do it 3 times a month, than cutting it once when it's overgrown.

LibertyFarmLandscaping
01-14-2011, 12:10 AM
I would say the Velocity Plus Scag deck, but unfortunately it's not available in the 36". The Snapper Pro 36" we ran this year ran well in wet grass, we only discharged with it so not sure how it would do mulching.

Richard Martin
01-14-2011, 03:11 AM
I see your location now,.

And I see your location...

How can you afford to service such a large area? Gas ain't cheap and you list a huge area, right up to my county (Pitt). "Our service area includes Onslow, Jones, Pender, Carteret and Craven counties."

khutch
01-14-2011, 09:59 AM
LOW lift, rather than HIGH lift blades will also help reduce under deck clumping in wet conditions.

Jason Rose
01-14-2011, 11:49 AM
Jim I think you are going to have to demo if you can. Same problem here but rather than rain every day it's dew. Haven't found a mower yet that will not clog under the deck. Toro may be a good choice though, I keep hearing good things about the turbo force deck and it's ability to cut wet. It's really too bad they stupidly did away with the T-Bar hydro units though. Some disliked that combo but I think it was great. Until toro comes out with a different handle set up on their hydro-walks other than pistol grips I think they are going to hurt in the market somewhat.

As for the suggestions about using low lift blades so the deck doesn't plug. I'm sorry but that's totally backwards. High lift blades create more air flow and prevent grass build up under the deck. Low lift blades just let it stick and hang under the deck. When it's wet you want high lifts. Not to mention the cut quality with low lift blades is usually poor, expecially in wet conditions, compared to high lifts.

torotorotoro
01-14-2011, 11:56 AM
I have a 36'' Exmark Turf Tracer HP w/ a sand-on. Works great, alot of horse power and never boggs down, even in 8 inch grass when we are cutting at 3 inches. Btw, you shouldn't cut in wet grass, One its bad for the plant, Two its bad on the machine extra stress on the motor and you will replace the blades non stop.

when you have that many yards to do you cant wait for the dew to dry in the morning,and sometimes you even have to mow in the rain.yes if you do it all the time the lawn will look a little funny, but the luxury of waiting for it to dry is only for you part timers with under 80 lawns. i use toro walk behinds in wet weather the toro cuts fine but it it tends to lay the grass down too much.

Bogielski
01-15-2011, 12:27 AM
when you have that many yards to do you cant wait for the dew to dry in the morning,and sometimes you even have to mow in the rain.yes if you do it all the time the lawn will look a little funny, but the luxury of waiting for it to dry is only for you part timers with under 80 lawns. i use toro walk behinds in wet weather the toro cuts fine but it it tends to lay the grass down too much.

Who said we were part timers? Commercial accounts i can see cutting in wet weather, however with residential clients i would like to wait it out. There are situations that we have cut when it is wet or raining, however it is not what we like to do. Alot of the residential lawns here stay wet awhile due to the water table being so high and the wetlands in the area. We do cut with all of our equipment. The 36'' wb w/o standing on the platform seems the have the least impact on the wet soil.

I see your location now, Where we live / mow, its considerably dry except during hurricane season. We haven't had a good season with plenty of rain in a few years. Normally by the middle of the season everything is brown if the homeowners do not water. And my comment about the 8'' tall grass, we get alot of people that only want it cut once a month due to their money situation. Little do they know it would cost the same if they had me do it 3 times a month, than cutting it once when it's overgrown.

I guess you didnt see this post ...

Roger
01-15-2011, 08:55 AM
LOW lift, rather than HIGH lift blades will also help reduce under deck clumping in wet conditions.

As pointed out, you have the two reversed, ... high lift blades are necessary for high air flow and keeping the deck as clean as possible.

Jim, I think blade selection is just as critical as the machine you choose. I have an Exmark Viking, 36" cut, 15 hp Kohler. It has been run very hard for 15 seasons. Some of the Spring growth here is heavy, and often wet. I look for "cut once, and out," meaning the best case is to have the clippings cut of, and discharged as quickly as possible. Recutting only makes green mush, not "fine clippings." I use a couple of different blades, because the difference in operation is significant. I understand your conditions to a large extent (grew up in the Willamette Valley).

Leave the Gator blades out of the selection. Leave any low lift blade out of the selection (and discount any thought of mulching clippings). Start with high lift blades, and perhaps move to extra high lift blades. But, some blades will not leave a clean cut (e.g. small strip down the middle where the blades meet -- air flow gets too disturbed under the deck).

I also have a John Deere ZTR, with 7 Iron deck. Under deck build up is minimal with high lift blades. So, there is a difference in decks also. In this case, the stamped deck, with rounded corners seem to clean better than manufactured decks, with sharp corners. I also have a Honda hand mower, HRX, quad-cut blades. This deck works the best of any hand mower I've used in the past for wet conditions -- high air flow, dome-shaped underdeck without any sharp corners.

... don't know if any of this helps, but remember that conditions vary so widely from location to location.

torotorotoro
01-15-2011, 02:14 PM
Who said we were part timers? Commercial accounts i can see cutting in wet weather, however with residential clients i would like to wait it out. There are situations that we have cut when it is wet or raining, however it is not what we like to do. Alot of the residential lawns here stay wet awhile due to the water table being so high and the wetlands in the area. We do cut with all of our equipment. The 36'' wb w/o standing on the platform seems the have the least impact on the wet soil.



I guess you didnt see this post ...

i saw the post. if you have a scheduel that is full, mon. thru sat. and it rains one day you can catch up on sun. but if you have to wait 2 hours every day for the dew to dry in the morning that will put you behind almost another day.what if it rains two or three days that week. only part timers have the luxury to wait for it to dry.if it starts to rain i just put on the grass catcher and hope next week it is dry when i cut that lawn so it will look better

Patriot Services
01-15-2011, 02:22 PM
To date we've always mowed all of our lawns with 21" Hondas. Mostly all fairly small lawns here in the urban areas we work in. But now with about 250 accounts, there are a handfull where we could actually use a larger mower. So we're going to invest in a 36" this year.

I don't care so much whether it has a ZTR capability or not. Don't care if it has a skid plate to ride on behind.

My main concerns are;


Which brand have you had the best experience with?
Which brand cuts wet grass the best?


Thanks in advance for your replies....

250 accounts, all with 21's. How many in your crew. I know its OT but I would like to hear your whole story.
Posted via Mobile Device

BrunoT
01-15-2011, 08:13 PM
I have a 36'' Exmark Turf Tracer HP w/ a sand-on. Works great, alot of horse power and never boggs down, even in 8 inch grass when we are cutting at 3 inches. Btw, you shouldn't cut in wet grass, One its bad for the plant, Two its bad on the machine extra stress on the motor and you will replace the blades non stop.

You heard the man. No mowing before 10am in summer and within 6 hours of a rain shower. Better make that 24 hours, it could be still wet out there. You should have a good 15 hours a week to get your mowing done.

torotorotoro
01-15-2011, 09:25 PM
yeah those guys in seatle must only mow 1 or 2 lawns a week. oh i remembered this is reality, i would be interested to know what those seatle guys run.its not the cutting that is the problem its the clumping and the laying down of the grass week after week that leads to complaints.that is why if i mow one wet one day i hope next week it is dry. another trick is i use floating deck mowers so if it is really bad i will raise mowing height a half inch to get by and cut short the next week hopefully when it is dryer.

JimLewis
01-16-2011, 06:34 PM
250 accounts, all with 21's. How many in your crew. I know its OT but I would like to hear your whole story.
Posted via Mobile Device

Well, we're working in tight little sub-divisions in the suburbs. Big houses. Small lawns. Houses are generally around 2500-3500 sq. ft. But your typical lawn around here is only about 1000 sq. ft. in front and maybe 1500 sq. ft. in back. And it's very hilly in most of the neighborhoods we work in. It's common to have to go up or down a series of steps or a hillside to get into the back yard. Standard gate is 36". It's not real easy to get into most people's back yards with anything other than a 21". And you wouldn't need a mower that big for most properties either. It just wouldn't save you much time at all. You may finish mowing 1-2 minutes sooner. But that's it.

We're in and out most properties in 20-30 minutes with 2 guys. Avg. of 18 properties a day. Some days more. Some days less. Some properties are just tiny little 300 sq. ft. front lawns. And a few are larger 4000-5000 sq. ft. lawns. Those are the ones where we need something bigger than a 21". And in the past we haven't had enough of those larger yards to warrant owning a larger mower. But now we're getting to that point. There are enough of them that we could save a significant amount of labor now, if we owned one.

Here's some photos of two of our properties. This is your standard front yard and back yard around here.


.
http://www.lewislandscape.com/photos/gallery/albums/Landscape-Maintenance/aab.sized.jpg

.
http://www.lewislandscape.com/photos/gallery/albums/Landscape-Maintenance/aaj.jpg



That second photo shows what the typical home size is like, if you look in the background. Large homes. Small lawns. What you don't see in that second photo is that on every one of those houses - including the lawn pictured - we would have to go down about 20-25 concrete or rock steps to get into those back yards. The front of the house looks like a 2 story. But from the back you can see they are 3 story. The back yards are often much lower or higher than the front yards.


.

Richard Martin
01-16-2011, 07:22 PM
There is a whole different mowing culture where you are. Most guys worry about whether they'll take a customer that only has a 36" gate let alone carrying mowers down steps. Lamers.

BrunoT
01-27-2011, 07:17 PM
That photo gives me nightmares. It's the opposite of what I like. It has poor access to the back (steps), you can tell it's lush succulent grass, so you probably can't mulch it. If you bag it's not wooded lots with a compost pile out back so you have to haul off what you bag. Too small an area to discharge probably. It's got a high planting bed/lawn ratio, so I suspect half your time is spent tending the beds. It's upscale, so they sure aren't doing the weeding themselves. Lotsa labor needed. Virtually no "sit on your rear end" time. The mowers do less of the job than on bigger lots.

dishboy
01-27-2011, 07:53 PM
That photo gives me nightmares. It's the opposite of what I like. It has poor access to the back (steps), you can tell it's lush succulent grass, so you probably can't mulch it. If you bag it's not wooded lots with a compost pile out back so you have to haul off what you bag. Too small an area to discharge probably. It's got a high planting bed/lawn ratio, so I suspect half your time is spent tending the beds. It's upscale, so they sure aren't doing the weeding themselves. Lotsa labor needed. Virtually no "sit on your rear end" time. The mowers do less of the job than on bigger lots.

That's mulchable with the right set up, even when wet, I image that's rye and rye is easy.

JimLewis
01-30-2011, 10:57 PM
That photo gives me nightmares. It's the opposite of what I like. It has poor access to the back (steps), you can tell it's lush succulent grass, so you probably can't mulch it. If you bag it's not wooded lots with a compost pile out back so you have to haul off what you bag. Too small an area to discharge probably. It's got a high planting bed/lawn ratio, so I suspect half your time is spent tending the beds. It's upscale, so they sure aren't doing the weeding themselves. Lotsa labor needed. Virtually no "sit on your rear end" time. The mowers do less of the job than on bigger lots.

Yep, right on all accounts. But even with a lot of time spent on beds, etc. we're pretty quick at those properties though. One two-man crew is in and out in 30 minutes or less. 45 minutes on a bad day. Our routes are very tight so we can do 16-20 of those in a day.

As for mulching, we can mulch, but only during the driest part of the summer. Only from about June - September. And even then it really depends on the lawn. We fertilize those lawns very regularly. So when they are getting plenty of water (like spring time) they grow 1-2" per week. It's just too much to mulch. Gotta bag it. That's just a way of life around here. And it's usually a little too damp to mulch perfectly too. But in the summer, if the client doesn't over-irrigate, the growth rate slows down to only maybe 1/2" per week. Then we can mulch.

Funny thing about mulching here is customers are REALLY against it. Everyone expects you to bag. So if they ever see us with our bags off people start coming out of their homes freaking out and yelling at us. So we've learned to keep the bags on the back of the mowers, even when the discharge hole is plugged and we're mulching. Then nobody ever says anything or notices.

Jason Rose
01-30-2011, 11:21 PM
So when they are getting plenty of water (like spring time) they grow 1-2" per week. It's just too much to mulch. Gotta bag it. That's just a way of life around here. And it's usually a little too damp to mulch perfectly too. But in the summer, if the client doesn't over-irrigate, the growth rate slows down to only maybe 1/2" per week. Then we can mulch.



1 to 2 inches of growth per week is fast growth? I would kill for that slow of growth in the spring! We see 4 to 6 inches a week growth here in the spring/early summer. No lie! And people on here just can't understand why everyone in my town bags...

JimLewis
01-30-2011, 11:34 PM
1 to 2 inches of growth per week is fast growth? I would kill for that slow of growth in the spring! We see 4 to 6 inches a week growth here in the spring/early summer. No lie! And people on here just can't understand why everyone in my town bags...

I don't know exactly what it is. I never go measure it. It may be more like 3" a week. I am sure there are weeks when we cut off that much. But the point is, whatever it is, it's too much to mulch. It just ends up in clumps on the ground when we mulch in those conditions.

Turf Dawg
01-31-2011, 09:36 AM
Sounds like you should be a Guinea Pig for one of these mowers http://www.ybravo.com/store/pc/Bravo-25-Commercial-Mower-BBC-2p560.htm My dealer has started carrying these and they look to be well built. I am going to their open house this Thursday, weather permitting, and am going to check them out a little close.

LibertyFarmLandscaping
01-31-2011, 09:59 AM
Sounds like you should be a Guinea Pig for one of these mowers http://www.ybravo.com/store/pc/Bravo-25-Commercial-Mower-BBC-2p560.htm My dealer has started carrying these and they look to be well built. I am going to their open house this Thursday, weather permitting, and am going to check them out a little close.


The 15 day money back guarantee sounds good on these.

All_Toro_4ME
01-31-2011, 10:03 AM
Sounds like you should be a Guinea Pig for one of these mowers http://www.ybravo.com/store/pc/Bravo-25-Commercial-Mower-BBC-2p560.htm My dealer has started carrying these and they look to be well built. I am going to their open house this Thursday, weather permitting, and am going to check them out a little close.

Snow storms for your area too turf dawg? They're saying 8-12 inches for us

dishboy
01-31-2011, 10:06 AM
I don't know exactly what it is. I never go measure it. It may be more like 3" a week. I am sure there are weeks when we cut off that much. But the point is, whatever it is, it's too much to mulch. It just ends up in clumps on the ground when we mulch in those conditions.

Naaaaaaaaaaaa

Roger
01-31-2011, 10:07 AM
TurfDawg, if you go to the open house, shoot pics, many pics. The web site is hopelessly inadequate to show the product. Some items of interest:
-- engine speed. It is using a GXV160, which sounds pretty small. But, since it uses a belt arrangement, perhaps the engine speed is increased, with different pulley sizes to keep BTS under standards.
-- transmission. How to shift, what speeds? I see it is only two speeds.
-- Bagger, now to attach, remove, size.
-- height adjustment, how to change, front and back
-- Operator controls, underhand bail for ground drive, operator presence (may not be needed for BBC)
-- durability of the wheels, plastic, steel, tread
-- blade, what kind of blade, single or double, options for high-lift, mulching, etc
-- discharge, any options (only bagging and mulching is noted)

Their web site is very poor to describe their products. With available technology of video that is so easy, but so helpful to explain a product, I wonder why so many manufacturers continue to use the same formats of ten years ago. Mystery to me ... a web site with video is an inexpensive, but easy way to sell their product.

Turf Dawg
01-31-2011, 10:49 AM
Snow storms for your area too turf dawg? They're saying 8-12 inches for us

I doubt we will get that much, but the temp differences this time of year can stink. Early last week the highs were near 60, then Friday and Sat they were in the upper 70's. Yesterday and today they will be in the 50's but midnight tonight will be the high for Tuesday.

Tuesday 27h-8 low with 100% chance sleet and snow.

Wednesday 17h-11 low

Thursday 30h 17 low Open House Day

Friday 36h-24 low 40% chance snow

This really stinks because the Superbowl is this weekend with all the Yanks coming to Dallas [I'm blaming this weather on them]
and the worse part is cold on the Dealer open house day. They always have a bunch of the vendors setup outside and you can drive around mowers and demo some of the other stuff. I hope they can keep the BBQ hot.

All_Toro_4ME
01-31-2011, 12:27 PM
I doubt we will get that much, but the temp differences this time of year can stink. Early last week the highs were near 60, then Friday and Sat they were in the upper 70's. Yesterday and today they will be in the 50's but midnight tonight will be the high for Tuesday.

Tuesday 27h-8 low with 100% chance sleet and snow.

Wednesday 17h-11 low

Thursday 30h 17 low Open House Day

Friday 36h-24 low 40% chance snow

This really stinks because the Superbowl is this weekend with all the Yanks coming to Dallas [I'm blaming this weather on them]
and the worse part is cold on the Dealer open house day. They always have a bunch of the vendors setup outside and you can drive around mowers and demo some of the other stuff. I hope they can keep the BBQ hot.

Yea, it does stink, doesnt take much snow and ice to shut an area down.

gasracer
01-31-2011, 12:33 PM
Sounds like you should be a Guinea Pig for one of these mowers http://www.ybravo.com/store/pc/Bravo-25-Commercial-Mower-BBC-2p560.htm My dealer has started carrying these and they look to be well built. I am going to their open house this Thursday, weather permitting, and am going to check them out a little close.

First thing I saw was it weighed 117 pounds. I wouldn't want to put that in the back of the ruck alone.

Jason Rose
01-31-2011, 01:47 PM
First thing I saw was it weighed 117 pounds. I wouldn't want to put that in the back of the ruck alone.

I think that's really close to what a toro, exmark, or honda commercial weighs... None I would want to be working out of the back of a truck with for sure.

Greg78
01-31-2011, 02:02 PM
I think that's really close to what a toro, exmark, or honda commercial weighs... None I would want to be working out of the back of a truck with for sure.

Yep eXmark 21 X series 122 lbs. Don't know about the others, should be pretty close.

gasracer
01-31-2011, 02:08 PM
I think that's really close to what a toro, exmark, or honda commercial weighs... None I would want to be working out of the back of a truck with for sure.

I save the room on my trailer for my big mowers and carry the 21" in the back of the truck.I got tired of having to park it to get one of the others off the truck.

fatguy28
01-31-2011, 09:05 PM
i have a 36 snapper pro and that thing is a beast great mechine and a better price than most

dishboy
01-31-2011, 09:21 PM
Back on topic. My experience with 36" mowers in the rain is having corners or dead spots where the grass can collect untouched by the blade circle and then dump is the major problem. Some claim low lift blades work best in rain but I like enough lift to keep the deck clean. The problem with this is if the deck design is inferior or lift is to great QOC degrades fast in the intersection of the two blades due to vortices and too much airflow . A notched blade also seems to work best as it moves the grass out without pushing it into the center of the deck where it will mulch up making a mess. That said there is not a lawn I can't mulch or in the worst cases bag if I have control of the N source /rate.

Thomas Grundy
01-31-2011, 09:53 PM
To date we've always mowed all of our lawns with 21" Hondas. Mostly all fairly small lawns here in the urban areas we work in. But now with about 250 accounts, there are a handfull where we could actually use a larger mower. So we're going to invest in a 36" this year.

I don't care so much whether it has a ZTR capability or not. Don't care if it has a skid plate to ride on behind.

My main concerns are;


Which brand have you had the best experience with?
Which brand cuts wet grass the best?


Thanks in advance for your replies....

Our best mowers are Exmark. For wet grass the discharge is very high with an end result of zero clumps in the lawn. Cons, watch where you are throwing. It doesn't take much to throw grass somewhere not wanted. Hydro is favored over belt driven due to the mobility stability and better traction when its wet or raining. Mowing never stops with a hydrolic exmark.

sildoc
02-28-2011, 11:33 PM
Hey Jim,
Not sure if you picked up a 36 or not. Were not to far south from you and we have used the Exmark TTHP 36 for some time. It mows quite well in wet lush grass using the highlift blades. My question for you is like before the Ybravo 25. Have tested these and we have 2 on order. bag well in the wet and you can swap them out for all your 21's and be done quicker. Cheap to fix as well.
Currently we have 4 exmark 26" which when the belt stays together are great. Little heavy but boy talk about adding 4-5 more yard a day just cause of the size difference. My biggest complaint with these, were bagging lush grass with out a blade modification. Since my old dealer(who did the modifications) went out of business, we are changing over to the YBravo. Tested it last fall with 5" turf cutting to 3" sopping wet and bagged like a pro.
Have had several 36" machines and it is hard to tell between them which actually bagged best when real wet, I think the blade and bagging system is the critical key. By the way we use the Accelerator catcher on the 36. Most durable and lightest one I have found so far, but open up your wallet!