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View Full Version : Pulverized Glass Mulch...??


pblc
01-14-2011, 02:02 PM
Got a call from a local station that is starting to pulverize glass. He approached me about selling this to the public. Has anyone ever used pulverized glass as a groundcover - maybe a substitute for mulch or rock? Thanks.

If this is a viable alternative that is catching on I'm going to try to wrap the entire operation up.

pblc
01-14-2011, 04:24 PM
30 views...... no thoughts?

JCLawn and more
01-14-2011, 04:36 PM
I don't get why you would? Its full of seeds, weeds would be horrible, and it would decompose to dirt quickly

markahurley
01-14-2011, 04:42 PM
I don't get why you would? Its full of seeds, weeds would be horrible, and it would decompose to dirt quickly

pulverized GLASS. full of seeds? who knew? :)

JCLawn and more
01-14-2011, 04:47 PM
pulverized GLASS. full of seeds? who knew? :)

lol glass not grass lol That makes more sense, but not really. Idk, it would be there forever, thats for sure

Patriot Services
01-14-2011, 05:05 PM
I have seen it used in faux features like as a blue stream effect. It wasn't pulverized though. These were 1/2" chunks that were then tumbled to soften the edges. it has been available for years for aquarium bottoms. I think the guy is getting desperate to unload the stuff. :usflag:

grassman177
01-15-2011, 12:27 AM
sounds ******ed, but if it is like a pea gravel or something i can see the use there if it is not sharp and is tumbled

sdk1959
01-15-2011, 01:07 AM
I don't get why you would? Its full of seeds, weeds would be horrible, and it would decompose to dirt quickly

Uh hello, unless you cut it when it's like a foot tall and has the seeds on it, no it does not have weed seeds.

I use grass clippings in my garden every single year and not only does it keep the weeds down it also adds nitrogen and helps keep the soil moist as well. I can push aside the grass clippings 3 days after watering and the soil will still be moist. I got both my neighbors to start using it in their shrub beds to keep weeds down, and it works. The trick is not to put more than 2-3 inches on at a time. This way the grass clippings just dry out and turn brown instead of decomposing. For that you want it in the compost pile. Only real advantage a wood or root mulch has is strictly cosmetic.

Pulverized glass though, that's not good, just someone else's trash.

LushGreenLawn
01-15-2011, 06:34 AM
Sounds like liability to me. Even if its tumbled, are you willing to put down a few tons of it, and have your kid fall into it?

JCLawn and more
01-15-2011, 07:05 AM
Uh hello, unless you cut it when it's like a foot tall and has the seeds on it, no it does not have weed seeds.

I use grass clippings in my garden every single year and not only does it keep the weeds down it also adds nitrogen and helps keep the soil moist as well. I can push aside the grass clippings 3 days after watering and the soil will still be moist. I got both my neighbors to start using it in their shrub beds to keep weeds down, and it works. The trick is not to put more than 2-3 inches on at a time. This way the grass clippings just dry out and turn brown instead of decomposing. For that you want it in the compost pile. Only real advantage a wood or root mulch has is strictly cosmetic.

Pulverized glass though, that's not good, just someone else's trash.

so how does new grass when we cut it before it seeds? ;)

Agape
01-15-2011, 12:12 PM
I would like to use pulverized glass as a lawn top dressing for people who owe me money lol

GreenI.A.
01-15-2011, 12:14 PM
i have seen something simular alot around here with blue colored glass that is laid they same as you would pea gravel as a dry river bed. It actually looks realy goood and until you get close it looks like water shimmering in the light. This stuff is tumbled like someone mentioned above. i have also seen a clear used sparatically indry creak beds of pea gravel to give a little shimmer. Another thing I have also seen is with a stream of water going thru their feature (waterfalls/koi ponds) having glass in the stream part. It gives the apearance that it is much deaper than the few inches they normally are as the sun is reflecting all diferent ways off of the glass

Patriot Services
01-15-2011, 12:14 PM
Is glass considered organic?
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Agape
01-15-2011, 12:44 PM
Is glass considered organic?
Posted via Mobile Device

it's just melted sand.

Patriot Services
01-15-2011, 01:41 PM
I would like to use pulverized glass as a lawn top dressing for people who owe me money lol

You've seen one too many episodes of "OZ".
Posted via Mobile Device

Agape
01-15-2011, 02:11 PM
You've seen one too many episodes of "OZ".
Posted via Mobile Device

I only have basic cable, but this "OZ" sounds fascinating lol

Patriot Services
01-15-2011, 02:30 PM
I only have basic cable, but this "OZ" sounds fascinating lol

HBO series couple years ago. Oz short for Oswald penitentiary. Killed a kingpin by putting ground glass in his food over time. Series lasted a few seasons. Sorry to get off topic but how much can you say about glass as a landscape material?
Posted via Mobile Device

Agape
01-15-2011, 05:09 PM
HBO series couple years ago. Oz short for Oswald penitentiary. Killed a kingpin by putting ground glass in his food over time. Series lasted a few seasons. Sorry to get off topic but how much can you say about glass as a landscape material?
Posted via Mobile Device

Yeah, not much, but I know (in my mind) that although you may be able to get it looking nice when fresh; It would not decompose if you got it into the grass, and weeding would churn up mud through it. I think it would be a stupid, trailer park thing to do.Be sure to include a mud spattered-paint chipped- faded garden gnome to go with it, and start searching for a wagon wheel.... I think you get it lol.

sdk1959
01-15-2011, 07:06 PM
so how does new grass when we cut it before it seeds? ;)



There are two major methods of reproduction in grasses. Some grasses have additional stems that grow sideways, either below ground or just above it. Stems that creep along the ground are called stolons, and stems that grow below ground are called rhizomes. Grasses use stolons and rhizomes to reach out and establish new grass culms. The stoleon or rhizome nurtures the new plant until it is strong enough to survive on its own. With Zosia grass, grass plugs are often used instead of seeds because it spreads so well.

Seeding is the other method but the grass on a maintained lawn will be cut before it is tall enough to produce seed.