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cowchaser
02-07-2011, 01:56 AM
Hello everyone I just have a few questions about repairing your own mower. '

Basically what I want to do is find a few older mowers, possible a wb or ztr. I don't want a brand new and to be honest can't afford it. I just want something that may have a few problems I could repair and have a good piece of equipment. Maybe even other equipment like a trimmer, chipper, tiller and so on.

Basically what I am asking is how can I tell if the equipment is repairable? I am not wanting to do this for a living just more of a hobby for myself. How do you go about finding manuals for your exact equipment that will show you what things should torque at, trouble shoot and all that good stuff. Just want something to do and have something to show for it in the end. I know anyone can go and buy a new motor, but I would like to try and repair/rebuild one myself.

I currently have an old craftsman that I mow with and it has some issue, but with my property a larger mower and a ztr would be a better piece of equipment for my use. Any help is appreciated.

lyndont
02-07-2011, 02:02 AM
With the 2 cycle stuff if there is still compression most of the time its a fairly simple fix. Usally just needs cleaned out new fuel with some seafoam, new plug, filter, and clean the screen on the exhaust. You would be amazed how many people put them on craigslist and say ran fine last year but can't get it started. $30. Those are the ones I like to see if its commercial grade stuff. Just be patient and you will see them.
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lyndont
02-07-2011, 02:07 AM
If it is extremely hard to pull you may want to check to see if the cylinder is scarred up with a flashlight but they probably won't let you do all that because you have to take some things apart to do it. I usually stay away if it is extremely hard to pull. Extreme flooding also causes that but if they haven't used it for a year it shouldn't be a flooded issue in my opinion.
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lyndont
02-07-2011, 02:12 AM
On mowers check every function before buying. Look the deck over and look for non factory or out of place welds. I went and looked at a jd hydro walk behind last year and the deck had been welded and was stuck at a certain height. You couldn't lower or raise the deck but other than that it was in great shape. I am almost positive someone gave $1000 for it and didn't notice that until they went to use it.
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Swampy
02-07-2011, 02:22 AM
If you can make it worth your wild, I do a lot of buying and reselling on the side while part of it is the fact your going to have to put money in it to make money off it. If you come up with some selling "Mower ran last fall, parked during winter turns over but doesn't fire" Some may run from it but if you can get the seller to lower his asking price it can make it worth your wild.

Check everything and anything, check fluid levels, move the machine around and operate it fully, check the safety's (such as getting off the seat with the pto engaged), look at the ground where the machine sits notice any oil spots or fresh fluids.

I picked a older toro 48in walkbehind for 200bucks in a non running condition, turns out it helps to a clean fuel line. Burned some oil, but still sold for $800

cowchaser
02-07-2011, 02:49 AM
Thanks for the ideas everyone. I have a few more and I am sure most of you can answer with no problem.

Are there any particular brands to stay away from? Is there a source for parts or where would someone go about buying them? Stuff like new lines, piston rings if needed and all that. Are there any books like chiltons out there or is it just someting you figure out over time.?

cowchaser
02-07-2011, 03:02 AM
lyndont I just noticed you just live down the road from me. I sure wish all this snow would go away. Watch the new tonight and see there is more coming next week though. Lived in Oklahoma all my life and haven't seen this much snow since I was a kid.

lyndont
02-07-2011, 03:11 AM
Yeah I know it. I just hope I can work all next week. Being off and at home is driving me crazy. If the snow here was more common I would consider getting a plow. I just can't justify spending the money for 1 storm. It may not snow enough at all next year where you would be able to use it. They don't care enough to pay someone when we only get an inch or two. We could have made some money this year though.
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lyndont
02-07-2011, 03:13 AM
Where are you from I can't see from my cell phone.
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IRRITECH
02-07-2011, 08:47 AM
Thanks for the ideas everyone. I have a few more and I am sure most of you can answer with no problem.

Are there any particular brands to stay away from? Is there a source for parts or where would someone go about buying them? Stuff like new lines, piston rings if needed and all that. Are there any books like chiltons out there or is it just someting you figure out over time.?

I will buy any commercial brand. Partstree.com has a tremendous amount of parts diagrams. Their pricing is a bit high for me but I can get the part numbers from them and search online for a better price. If you can actually go see the equipment, take a compression tester and spark plug wrench with you. I have also bought several pieces of equipment off ebay. Carb rebuild kits are cheap and will usually do wonders for an older piece of equipment. For alot of the more common engines their are repair manuals online free, Just start tearing things apart and you will learn very quickly.

cowchaser
02-07-2011, 11:28 AM
lyndont I am from Bartlesville.

cowchaser
02-07-2011, 11:30 AM
thanks irritech.