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View Full Version : Truffles - Haute Cuisine


Barefoot James
02-08-2011, 05:03 PM
Winter time folks - let's talk about Truffles. Did a search, not talked about before and had it's own thread so here is one. I would love to grow them. If possiable. I would LOVE to be a little Haute!:confused::laugh:
Let's get started.
From Wiki -
A truffle (pronounced /ˈtrʌfəl/) is the fruiting body of an underground mushroom; spore dispersal is accomplished through fungivores, animals that eat fungi. Almost all truffles are ectomycorrhizal and are therefore usually found in close association with trees.

There are hundreds of species of truffles that are big, but the fruiting body of some (mostly in the genus 'Tuber') are highly prized as a food. The 18th-century French gastronome Brillat-Savarin called these truffles "the diamond of the kitchen". Edible truffles are held in high esteem in French, Spanish, northern Italian and Greek cooking, as well as in international haute cuisine.

The genome sequence of the Périgord black truffle was published in March 2010.

Other than Wiki - I got nothing except this (above) - but willing to glean!!!

phasthound
02-08-2011, 05:21 PM
http://www.fungi.com/

starry night
02-08-2011, 05:21 PM
I have never tasted truffles. Anyone?
Here's a good link: http://www.gourmetfoodstore.com/truffles/cooking-truffles.asp

Turboguy
02-08-2011, 06:09 PM
I tried them when I was in Italy long ago. I wasn't impressed enough to spend the kind of money they go for. A Big Mac is fine for me.

Barefoot James
02-08-2011, 06:33 PM
Between Barefoot, phasthound, Dirt and Turbo we got 4 dudes that know nothing about truffles - which makes me wonder - how much can we all make $$$ when somebody can help us - and we for sure need some:laugh:. Anybody - please can you shed some real input on an organic product that is commanding some big $$$.

starry night
02-08-2011, 06:53 PM
Seriously, now that I'm thinking about it, why aren't truffles grown here?
Instead they are imported from Europe. Climate difference? Soil difference?.............wait a minute.... I just discovered this:
http://www.tennesseetruffle.com/ Watch the video.

Turboguy
02-08-2011, 06:57 PM
At 50 bucks an ounce I would find being a seller much more interesting than being a buyer.

It seems to me that the one I tried a sliver of in Italy was a $ 350.00 Truffle and that was in 1985 or so.

NattyLawn
02-08-2011, 07:45 PM
Growing manual is 10 grand...

http://www.garlandtruffles.com/trufflebooksandproducts.html

phasthound
02-08-2011, 08:43 PM
Between Barefoot, phasthound, Dirt and Turbo we got 4 dudes that know nothing about truffles - which makes me wonder - how much can we all make $$$ when somebody can help us - and we for sure need some:laugh:. Anybody - please can you shed some real input on an organic product that is commanding some big $$$.

I get inquires all the time for organic growing mediums for marijuana.
But, they all forget to call me back. :D

Barefoot James
02-08-2011, 09:32 PM
OK - I think we have some juices flowing......let's start asking questions, do we have any good contacts for truffles - I'm the moderator by the way. This could be a fascinating thread BTW.
10K for a instruction manual - yes I smell $$

JDUtah
02-08-2011, 10:06 PM
Where would you get the innoculant? What soil conditions, ph, OM%, Hosts, etc does it prefer?

NattyLawn
02-09-2011, 08:38 AM
Where would you get the innoculant? What soil conditions, ph, OM%, Hosts, etc does it prefer?

According to what I read, the Mid-Atlantic states are best for them in the US. I can try and dig further, but the website I linked gave some info and trees to purchase. I think the 10 grand manual includes 100 trees. $100 bucks a tree though.

I'll send an e-mail to a guy I know that goes mushroom hunting.

starry night
02-09-2011, 09:00 AM
Where would you get the innoculant? What soil conditions, ph, OM%, Hosts, etc does it prefer?

JD, if you read some of the links, you'll the see many of the answers.
Soil, well-drained alkaline. Hosts, hazelnut or oak. Also info on climate.

As I read Natty's link, the $10,000 manual was free when you bought some quantity of trees.

Barefoot James
02-09-2011, 11:25 AM
Yes - it says you need to buy 250 trees @ $22 a tree so $5500. I don't know why one would not, just get all the infected with truffle spore trees + free book vs just book for 10K?? He also says pretty much nobody has been successful yet - EXCEPT HIM:confused:
It also take like 8 years min to get the trees where they will produce the truffles and you pretty much need a female pig or a truffle dog to even find the truffles:dizzy: The female pig gets excited because the truffle smells like a male pigs ______________ privates? Also weird so folks that love truffles must also be attracted to male pigs ___________ privates;). So where does one train a dog to be a truffle dog? I would think if the dog was trained to easily follow the scent of anything you could show them a truffle get them to smell it and you would be off hunting truffles?
They say the female pig is not great to use to hunt the truffle cause when they find them they try to eat them - right away. The dog just wants a pet on the head and a treat and they let you dig the truffle out. This site also says they will buy your truffles for $500 a pound minimum and they are selling truffles this year for $800 a pound. The trees are tiny and come in little 4 inch pots and you plant them close together in a specific area with specific soil conditions, sun light, wind breaks, etc. Harvest Sept - May. @ $500 a pound 1 acre should net you $25,000 min - So I guess if you get your own restaurants to sell to for $1000 that acre could net you 50K.
Amazing to just let your mind wander - huh. I would for sure like to get a truffle dog and do some exploring in the woods. Who knows:cool2:

NattyLawn
02-09-2011, 12:05 PM
Sorry, I was off about the tree price.

If you take a look at dirtandhoops link, the type of dog for truffle hunting is mentioned is in the video, but it looks like the owner just has a black lab.

Speaking of pigs, I'm reading a book on turning compost by adding a few kernels of corn to manure. Keep the pigs out and when you're ready to turn it, unleash the pigs. They will go nuts digging out the fermented corn kernels and aerating the compost.

Will too many truffles lower the demand and the final price? It doesn't seem like the suppliers want more competition.

A good supply chain will be critical.

Tim Wilson
02-10-2011, 06:48 PM
http://www.ducketttruffieres.com/index.htm

http://natruffling.org

http://www.bctruffles.ca

http://www.trufficulture.ca/default.aspx?PageID=1000 My friend works for these guys as mentioned in the other thread (I think)

I have hazel nuts growing already. Maybe I'll try it.

tallrick
02-11-2011, 10:03 AM
I had heard about truffle orchards in North Carolina. Here in south Florida I have found truffle-like growths but have been too scared to eat them.

Barefoot James
02-11-2011, 10:25 AM
I had heard about truffle orchards in North Carolina. Here in south Florida I have found truffle-like growths but have been too scared to eat them.

Great point. How does one tell if a mushroom or truffle is poision or not? Feed it to the pig first - :laugh:

Tim Wilson
02-11-2011, 09:38 PM
Great point. How does one tell if a mushroom or truffle is poision or not? Feed it to the pig first - :laugh:

Buy the infected tree or get a pig r' dog and go huntin