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View Full Version : Alternative to Scotts Annual Lawn Program?


mikec82
03-08-2011, 08:12 AM
I have been looking into the Scotts Annual Lawn Program mentioned on their site as a method of maintaining healthier lawn this season. The program takes into account your zip code, the type of grass you have, and the store you most frequently shop at. Then it calculated a four-step method to implement throughout the sprint-summer. My was Turf Builder with Crabgrass Preventer in February, Turf Builder with Weed Control in April, Southern Lawn Fertilizer in June, and Turf Builder Winterguard in September. The main draws to this program in my opinion are the simplicity and cost. I don't have a lot of know-how or cash to spend. Each of these bags are only $50. However, reviews on their own site give each of these an average of 3 out of 5 stars. I wondered if there was another brand that had a better reputation, or perhaps could you recommend another resource for developing a program similar to this? I live in Chattanooga, Tennessee and have tall fescue lawn.

dishboy
03-08-2011, 08:23 AM
I have been looking into the Scotts Annual Lawn Program mentioned on their site as a method of maintaining healthier lawn this season. The program takes into account your zip code, the type of grass you have, and the store you most frequently shop at. Then it calculated a four-step method to implement throughout the sprint-summer. My was Turf Builder with Crabgrass Preventer in February, Turf Builder with Weed Control in April, Southern Lawn Fertilizer in June, and Turf Builder Winterguard in September. The main draws to this program in my opinion are the simplicity and cost. I don't have a lot of know-how or cash to spend. Each of these bags are only $50. However, reviews on their own site give each of these an average of 3 out of 5 stars. I wondered if there was another brand that had a better reputation, or perhaps could you recommend another resource for developing a program similar to this? I live in Chattanooga, Tennessee and have tall fescue lawn.

If you are after HEALTHY you would do better to post this in the Organic section.

KeystoneLawn&Landscaping
03-08-2011, 08:25 AM
You should get a few quotes from local licensed applicators for the cost of thier programs. Depending on the size of your lawn, they may be the same cost as doing it yourself or even less expensive. Advantages to hiring a professional are many; education, experience, no left over product for you to store, time saved for yourself, etc.

ncknaklawns
03-08-2011, 08:36 AM
I like Scotts. They have a few different concentration lines in the same basic products. These are all homeowner brands but work great. Except the weed control. Its good but you really need to hit them when damp and then hope for heat. I spray liquid in addition to using it on my own lawn. The ground ivy is a real problem and sprays work well on it. Love the winterguard, I put it down in January if a thaw happens. The insect control is great in July. Hevn't used crap yet but planting seed in spring. Seems like for professional use it would be cost prohibitive but maybe they work out a deal if your a "Scotts Company" Franchiser. The pros at Lesco and others seem to other distinct products with certain advantages rather than one size fits all.

Turf Dawg
03-08-2011, 08:41 AM
You should get a few quotes from local licensed applicators for the cost of thier programs. Depending on the size of your lawn, they may be the same cost as doing it yourself or even less expensive. Advantages to hiring a professional are many; education, experience, no left over product for you to store, time saved for yourself, etc.

I agree with this. Not saying you could not do it yourself but like mentioned above sometimes a pro can do a better job for near the same cost.

txgrassguy
03-08-2011, 08:44 AM
First of all I don't care who recommends what product(s) - without a thorough soil test and site evaluation all you are going to receive is at best a guess.
There are a myriad of details to consider well beyond what host turf is in existence so ask your county extension agent what information he/she/it has for cultural practices in your area to include soil test data.
Then post the accumulated data with pictures of your host turf site including a shot of the soil profile for an actual recommendation.