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View Full Version : What cultivar of st. Aug.


Tri-City Outdoors
03-14-2011, 08:59 PM
Well, 1st off I did not have the camera so no pic. Sorry!
Got a sod job coming up. Installing next to established S.A. But I am unsure what cultivar it is. They homeowner's have been cutting it to short even for a dwarf variety. About 2". The blades are fine unlike a floratam. More of a lime green opposed to dark green! It was a long day and should have looked at it better & brought the camera. The job is a hour drive (round trip). Any suggestions? TIA!

Florida Gardener
03-14-2011, 09:36 PM
Yea, don't go to England.

Ric
03-14-2011, 11:39 PM
Well, 1st off I did not have the camera so no pic. Sorry!
Got a sod job coming up. Installing next to established S.A. But I am unsure what cultivar it is. They homeowner's have been cutting it to short even for a dwarf variety. About 2". The blades are fine unlike a floratam. More of a lime green opposed to dark green! It was a long day and should have looked at it better & brought the camera. The job is a hour drive (round trip). Any suggestions? TIA!

Tri

1. Some cultivars are more responsive to fertilizer than others but Color is not a good criteria for determining cultivar.

2. Dwarf Cultivars that are stunted by mowing or lack of Fertilizer will grow lower and slower.

3. location of the turf and approx age might be a CLUE and you may be able guess if you know the history of that region.

4. The Dwarf Cultivar with a Very Fine texture is Jade. followed by Seville with just a tad bigger texture and then Delmar with a little bit bigger texture. but these of course are just possible guesses.

Tri-City Outdoors
03-15-2011, 10:34 AM
The job is located in Daytona Beach. The old sod is about 6-8 years old. I'm thinking Seville. When I pick up the down payment Ill take a pic.

Landscape Poet
03-15-2011, 09:55 PM
The job is located in Daytona Beach. The old sod is about 6-8 years old. I'm thinking Seville. When I pick up the down payment Ill take a pic.


With the location and the lighter color description you have given, could it not be palmetto?

Ric
03-15-2011, 10:51 PM
With the location and the lighter color description you have given, could it not be palmetto?

Mikey

He said FINE BLADE.

Keith
03-15-2011, 11:03 PM
Well, everything is fine compared to Floratam ;) Palmetto would seem a likely find in Volusia county, but the color he described does sound more like Seville.

Ric
03-15-2011, 11:18 PM
Well, everything is fine compared to Floratam ;) Palmetto would seem a likely find in Volusia county, but the color he described does sound more like Seville.

Keith

There are or were a lot of Seville Sod Farms on or near the East Coast. Too many people call Floratam, Crab Grass. Seville was real popular at one time because of the fine blade that didn't look like Crab Grass.

justanotherlawnguy
03-16-2011, 12:44 AM
Must be a heck of a sod job to drive an hour each way!!!!
Posted via Mobile Device

Tri-City Outdoors
03-16-2011, 11:42 PM
The job is a hour drive (round trip).

Must be a heck of a sod job to drive an hour each way!!!!
Posted via Mobile Device

30 min each way!

Landscape Poet
03-17-2011, 08:37 PM
Keith

There are or were a lot of Seville Sod Farms on or near the East Coast. Too many people call Floratam, Crab Grass. Seville was real popular at one time because of the fine blade that didn't look like Crab Grass.

Given the lighter color description given, his location, which is close new smyrna, home of Kirkland Sod, where Palmetto was created, it was worth a shot, but what do I know Ric, I am just a simple lawn boy, not a expert L & O operator like yourself.

Tri-City Outdoors
03-17-2011, 09:17 PM
Links for pics. It was just about dark when I took them.

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k544/TriCityOutdoors/sodtype002.jpg

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k544/TriCityOutdoors/sodtype001-2.jpg

Thanks for the input everyone!

Ric
03-17-2011, 09:19 PM
Given the lighter color description given, his location, which is close new smyrna, home of Kirkland Sod, where Palmetto was created, it was worth a shot, but what do I know Ric, I am just a simple lawn boy, not a expert L & O operator like yourself.

Mikey

Even simple lawn boys have local knowledge that you can't expect a genus like myself to know. But I also will call your simple mind to the fact that we are all doing nothing more than GUESSING. Call it Educated Guessing if it makes you feel better.

Landscape Poet
03-17-2011, 10:36 PM
Links for pics. It was just about dark when I took them.

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k544/TriCityOutdoors/sodtype002.jpg

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k544/TriCityOutdoors/sodtype001-2.jpg

Thanks for the input everyone!


My thoughts are look at Palmetto like I suggested, could be Bitter Blue also! Looks like a fair amount of leaf blades that are dead from the winter, that could explain why it does not have a good tight knit right now.
If you are cutting the lawn - sharpen the blades, if not tell the home owner to do so, looks like some jagged ends on that turf to say the least. Looks like there are lots of lesions on those leaf blades too.

Landscape Poet
03-17-2011, 10:43 PM
Mikey

Even simple lawn boys have local knowledge that you can't expect a genus like myself to know. But I also will call your simple mind to the fact that we are all doing nothing more than GUESSING. Call it Educated Guessing if it makes you feel better.

Educated guessing it is - but to your previous post - palmetto - although a dwarf - is in fact generally finer texture. And yes - my guess above is because I have local experience, even though they are roughly a hour away from me. Rob had to have their palmetto for his own lawn this past fall, so I know what it and their bitter blue looks like - and I would guess either one of them.

Keith
03-17-2011, 11:48 PM
Rob had to have their palmetto for his own lawn this past fall,

Is it still alive? :laugh: After my palmetto fiasco from about eight or nine years ago, I still won't install it.

Landscape Poet
03-18-2011, 08:22 AM
Is it still alive? :laugh: After my palmetto fiasco from about eight or nine years ago, I still won't install it.

His is doing well, even though he we installed his the night before our first frost here in early December. To my knowledge he has not applied any fertilizer or weed control - is hand picking the weeds that arise.

I will say though - on his - he brought in several yards of mushroom compost and worked it into his existing soil before he/we laid his sod.

The biggest issues I have with the dwarfs so far - is how spongy some of them get on properties when the home owners are watering the hell out of and the L and o is applying. Seems like they get real real real spongy. I picked up a client in October or November who has a Seville lawn that gets plenty of sun, plenty of fert, plenty of water - and I have to cut it in transport mode to not cut it to low due to the fact how much the mower sinks when it is on top of the turf. I have suggested green sand to the owner or topdressing - and he is currently thinking about it.

Keith
03-18-2011, 11:52 AM
His is doing well, even though he we installed his the night before our first frost here in early December. To my knowledge he has not applied any fertilizer or weed control - is hand picking the weeds that arise.

I will say though - on his - he brought in several yards of mushroom compost and worked it into his existing soil before he/we laid his sod.

The biggest issues I have with the dwarfs so far - is how spongy some of them get on properties when the home owners are watering the hell out of and the L and o is applying. Seems like they get real real real spongy. I picked up a client in October or November who has a Seville lawn that gets plenty of sun, plenty of fert, plenty of water - and I have to cut it in transport mode to not cut it to low due to the fact how much the mower sinks when it is on top of the turf. I have suggested green sand to the owner or topdressing - and he is currently thinking about it.



I also put down Palmetto in my own yard the night before the first frost, in November 2002. It pretty much went dormant after the second frost, but came out nicely in the spring. I developed a hole in one of the sections of the yard and expanded from there. Most of the yard was wiped out by the next fall. It looked so good in the spring that I put down about 30 pallets in other locations. I would say that roughly half of it was lost within 15 months.

I've used it sporatically since, but it has never performed well for me.


The dwarfs are definitely thatch builders. When I first started mowing, we had a number of the Seville lawns like you describe. If you could mow them on the highest setting, you had to avoid the edges and just use the trimmer. You could never just roll over the edge and start cutting. They formed a natural curb, sometimes 6" tall along the concrete. With most of the runners above ground, and some of the roots, they were also some of the worst yards to edge. When you left, they just had this burned side around all the edges. Most of these yards were plugged with Seville. No variety of St. Augustine covers faster from plugs, but unfortunately it develops a whole bunch of problems because of it.

Landscape Poet
03-22-2011, 09:26 PM
I also put down Palmetto in my own yard the night before the first frost, in November 2002. It pretty much went dormant after the second frost, but came out nicely in the spring. I developed a hole in one of the sections of the yard and expanded from there. Most of the yard was wiped out by the next fall. It looked so good in the spring that I put down about 30 pallets in other locations. I would say that roughly half of it was lost within 15 months.
.

Go into more detail - I am wondering what is this hole that you are speaking of was. Did you ever find out what the cause was.

Keith
03-22-2011, 11:37 PM
I have no idea. The roots just rotted away in about a 2 ft circle, and the rest followed. It went from perfect to garbage in less than 6 months.