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View Full Version : How many of you would take this on?


MDLawn
04-04-2011, 10:59 AM
So I get an email, with the picture below, from a potential customer in need of removing this large 10' x 30' area of english ivy. It is all over the place. I do not have a pesticide certification so that is out of the question for me. The only problem I see is this getting out of control time wise and the price escalating through the roof!! Their thoughts were to put grass in its place but they say it is a relatively shady area. I have successfully removed areas of ivy and replace with a lawn, but nothing this large and in a not so good place for growing grass. Suggestions, opinions, are appreciated. Going to give an estimate, just not sure its worth the time for a "No Thanks".

Thanks!

ReddensLawnCare
04-04-2011, 11:17 AM
If it was me, I would do the work. If you need, find a person with a PL, and have them spray with RU, wait a couple of weeks, spray again if it starts to green up..till the area, add some ammends..and plant. I would probably charge around 500 give or take, but thats just me

STIHL GUY
04-04-2011, 12:20 PM
If it was me, I would do the work. If you need, find a person with a PL, and have them spray with RU, wait a couple of weeks, spray again if it starts to green up..till the area, add some ammends..and plant. I would probably charge around 500 give or take, but thats just me

that sounds like a good plan. it might turn into another regular customer as well so its better to do the work if you can instead of turning it down

Dr.NewEarth
04-04-2011, 12:56 PM
Is it warm enough to use Round-up? Check your labels!

MDLawn
04-04-2011, 01:46 PM
Is it warm enough to use Round-up? Check your labels!

I'm not a certified applicator so for me its out of the question.

MDLawn
04-04-2011, 01:48 PM
Its not that I don't want the job I just know this can be a pain and even more so without killing it off some. Better looking into the applicator classes. Just have to figure out the best approach to this. Would love to just dig it out but that is rediculous not to mention not needed and expensive.

Florida Gardener
04-04-2011, 02:35 PM
Why wouldn't you take this job?? Cleanups for me are one of my most profitable services as people usually want it done on the spot and won't price shop it...take it and upsell some landscaping!
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KrayzKajun
04-04-2011, 02:44 PM
put a brush blade on a trimmer and go to town!!! run an old push mower over it

PerfectEarth
04-04-2011, 04:10 PM
These jobs scare people way more than necessary.... just don't bring a knife to a gunfight and make it worth the money. Don't mow it, you don't need to spray it or apply tons of elbow grease- rent a very small mini-ex and scarify the ground with the toothed bucket. Start in the corner and work your way out, loosening the soil and roots (like the top 2") and you'll soon have a HUGE wad of ivy to toss in the truck. Yes, you'll have to do some hand work but this is a great way to grub out 98% of a thick groundcover mat.

Digging it out is not crazy- it's probably the best way to eradicate it. I've done this before and it works great.

Half-a** it, and you'll have problems.

rowdiestang
04-04-2011, 04:25 PM
You can use round up but it needs a surfactant in it to help stick it to the leaf, the leaves are too waxy, unless it is new growth. I agree with the above, use a small tractor and scrape it up.

Dr.NewEarth
04-04-2011, 04:45 PM
Can you not go to a supplier and read the directions onthe Round-up yourself any-ways, so you know what you are getting yourself involved with????

Ivy is tough to get rid of at the best of times. It has underground runners and rizomes and you won't be able to pull them all.
Those tendrils will leave marks on the wall. You won't be able to clean that off very well.

Let's all get certified!

Mark Oomkes
04-04-2011, 04:51 PM
Is it warm enough to use Round-up? Check your labels!

Bless you, 'bout time someone made this point.

I was talking to a Master Gardener that wanted to apply Round-Up after edging some beds, here in MI. After we had morning temps in the teens last week. And this place is shady anyways.

:confused: :hammerhead:

TurnerLawn&Landscape
04-04-2011, 05:22 PM
I would first see how hard it is going to be to rip out by hand! If it's gonna be a nightmare i would rent a tiller and till the whole area. Next you and another guy or two get on your hands and knees and remove the ivy. Explain to the customer this might be very time consuming. Estimate high so you dont screw yourself. I love these type of jobs because your cost for this job should be minimal.

MDLawn
04-04-2011, 05:49 PM
I'm not sure if people keep missing this but I AM NOT A CERTIFIED PESTICIDE APPLICATOR :) So no roundup. I will probably rent something to dig that area out, she requested that anyways so it may be worth it! Because it is a tight city lot I was thinking mini skid (dingo) if I can get a toothed bucket, or maybe the mini ex. I'm not scared of the job just do NOT want to screw myself on time. Well I'm going there Thursday and will use all your ideas to estimate this.

MDLawn
04-04-2011, 05:50 PM
I would first see how hard it is going to be to rip out by hand! If it's gonna be a nightmare i would rent a tiller and till the whole area. Next you and another guy or two get on your hands and knees and remove the ivy. Explain to the customer this might be very time consuming. Estimate high so you dont screw yourself. I love these type of jobs because your cost for this job should be minimal.

Used a tiller on a similar job to this. NIGHTMARE. All the ivy does is wrap around the tines and you need to stop every 30 seconds to unwrap it.

Dr.NewEarth
04-04-2011, 06:01 PM
Relax man. Things can be written to answer your question, but also to help others.

at any rate, go read the directions any ways. It'll make you smarter.

dtriv89
04-04-2011, 06:05 PM
Used a tiller on a similar job to this. NIGHTMARE. All the ivy does is wrap around the tines and you need to stop every 30 seconds to unwrap it.

x2 Tiller's a bad idea. I'd rent a bobcat mt55 or a dingo and scrape it out.

PerfectEarth
04-04-2011, 06:21 PM
x3....do not, I repeat do NOT run a tiller in there. You will have a disaster on your hands. You want to rip it out neatly, not replant a million ivy roots and make a mess.

I have a Dingo and I wouldn't even take it in there. Mini-ex, I'm tellin' ya!:laugh:

Charge appropriately!

MDLawn
04-04-2011, 06:47 PM
Relax man. Things can be written to answer your question, but also to help others.

at any rate, go read the directions any ways. It'll make you smarter.


Sorry, there wasn't meant to be any tone to that (gotta love forums) just a hey no license here
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highlander316
04-04-2011, 06:48 PM
what about torch? The only thing I would do first is dig/cut it away from all other flammable sources it may be attached to.

Leo the Landscaper
04-04-2011, 08:16 PM
x3....do not, I repeat do NOT run a tiller in there. You will have a disaster on your hands. You want to rip it out neatly, not replant a million ivy roots and make a mess.

I have a Dingo and I wouldn't even take it in there. Mini-ex, I'm tellin' ya!:laugh:

Charge appropriately!

Agreed!!! Take a mini excavator in and work your way out. The dingo or bobcat mt will require lots of trips back and forth and you will be replanting lots of ivy that way.

Also a nursery spade and some hand labor may go faster than you think. Run the spade just under the soil level like you are lifting sod. I have had great success with this method on ivy.

MDLawn
04-04-2011, 08:55 PM
x3....do not, I repeat do NOT run a tiller in there. You will have a disaster on your hands. You want to rip it out neatly, not replant a million ivy roots and make a mess.

I have a Dingo and I wouldn't even take it in there. Mini-ex, I'm tellin' ya!:laugh:

Charge appropriately!

Don't worry about the "charge appropriately", I find I am one of the highest around my area (although I think its still not enough) and wont take on work for nothing. I'll ask you a question since it seems you have experience with equipment. Never used a mini ex, I have used a lot of other stuff, is that something you can load on a dump trailer? I have a 7x14 14k. It's about 28-30" floor height or is an equipment trailer needed?

hoylebros
04-04-2011, 11:04 PM
Just had a thought while reading through this. I wonder if a sod cutter would work? Has anybody ever used one to remove this type of stuff? Just an idea! Hope it goes good for ya!

Leo the Landscaper
04-04-2011, 11:31 PM
Just had a thought while reading through this. I wonder if a sod cutter would work? Has anybody ever used one to remove this type of stuff? Just an idea! Hope it goes good for ya!

I have and spade works faster since the soil won't hold together but is worth is on pachysandra
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PerfectEarth
04-04-2011, 11:32 PM
Also a nursery spade and some hand labor may go faster than you think. Run the spade just under the soil level like you are lifting sod. I have had great success with this method on ivy.

Me too. Or a long handled sod knife tool.

The goal is to not weigh yourself down moving or removing a bunch of soil unnecessarily along with the Ivy. You'll take out some of course, but you want the Ivy out, not a ton of soil.

A sod cutter could work- scalp the ivy down with a bagged push mower and sod cut the area....but you'd be creating a lot of soil to deal with if you have to set the blade low enough to get everything. That's why I like the mini- it leaves the soil and takes the ivy with the teeth.

You can get a tiny mini that will fit in your dump trailer easily. You could fit 4 of them in there! And the learning curve is not bad at all. Just take your time.

EDIT- look at post #120 here- http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=316386&page=12

That's a small mini in my dump trailer. The little slope landscape on that page (with the juniper and spruce, etc) was an area COVERED in thick Euonymus groundcover. The mini left all the soil (and did some grading) and all I took away was the junk. Wish I had a before pic. Hope this info helps.

Get Some...
04-05-2011, 04:22 AM
Mini excavator is definately the way to go, get one with a thumb if you can.
Then just pck up the ivy wad and drop it in the dump trailer.

vencops
04-05-2011, 09:00 AM
Getting the ivy out of there is job #1. IMO, that will be the easier part.

KEEPING the ivy from coming back is job #2. If you're not willing to use chemicals, I see this being your nightmare.

It could take a year to completely kill off ALL that ivy.

ron mexico75
04-05-2011, 09:31 AM
Please post pics of whatever you choose to do. I HATE ivy. By the way, whoever advised to use a tiller has obviously not removed ivy before. That would be the equivalent of feeding barbed wire into a wood chipper.

MDLawn
04-05-2011, 10:39 AM
Please post pics of whatever you choose to do. I HATE ivy. By the way, whoever advised to use a tiller has obviously not removed ivy before. That would be the equivalent of feeding barbed wire into a wood chipper.

Ha isnt that the truth!!! :laugh::laugh:

MDLawn
04-05-2011, 10:44 AM
Getting the ivy out of there is job #1. IMO, that will be the easier part.

KEEPING the ivy from coming back is job #2. If you're not willing to use chemicals, I see this being your nightmare.

Well again I don't have a license to use chemicals. I did a removal similar to this although much smaller. I removed a 5'x20' section and replaced it with grass. Never took over the grass. But I completely understand how invasive this plant is! I will make sure to point this out to them.

It could take a year to completely kill off ALL that ivy.

Yea total eradication is going to be tough!

knox gsl
04-05-2011, 11:18 AM
I cleaned an area like this up last fall, it was very easy. I took a mower and scalped it to the ground then I used a power seeder to loosen the soil and cut the roots of the ivy. Planted TTTF at a rate of 10lbs per 1K and now its a matching addition to the rest of the lawn. The ivy will go away if it is mowed weekly and you keep it off of the trees, walls and fences. BTW round up will not kill Ivy.

MDLawn
04-05-2011, 11:20 AM
I cleaned an area like this up last fall, it was very easy. I took a mower and scalped it to the ground then I used a power seeder to loosen the soil and cut the roots of the ivy. Planted TTTF at a rate of 10lbs per 1K and now its a matching addition to the rest of the lawn. The ivy will go away if it is mowed weekly and you keep it off of the trees, walls and fences. BTW round up will not kill Ivy.

Good to hear!!!

Mark Oomkes
04-05-2011, 11:39 AM
Please post pics of whatever you choose to do. I HATE ivy. By the way, whoever advised to use a tiller has obviously not removed ivy before. That would be the equivalent of feeding barbed wire into a wood chipper.

:drinkup:

LMAO

ReddensLawnCare
04-05-2011, 01:44 PM
Roundup will kill ivy...I have used it multiple times on a few different varieties. You have to double, and sometimes triple apply as stated in the first post on this thread by me. that will kill the above surface growth...the plant will react by releasing carbs stored in the roots to "come out of Dormancy" so to speak. Spray it again once it begins to leaf (Always using surfactant) wait a couple of weeks and if it begins to put out again, spray it one last time, I have never had to do it more than three times...Then when you pull it out (not with a tiller :) ) you wont have to worry about it growing back. OP, I know you dont have your PL, but I wanted to put this out there.

ron mexico75
04-05-2011, 02:29 PM
Roundup will kill ivy...I have used it multiple times on a few different varieties. You have to double, and sometimes triple apply as stated in the first post on this thread by me. that will kill the above surface growth...the plant will react by releasing carbs stored in the roots to "come out of Dormancy" so to speak. Spray it again once it begins to leaf (Always using surfactant) wait a couple of weeks and if it begins to put out again, spray it one last time, I have never had to do it more than three times...Then when you pull it out (not with a tiller :) ) you wont have to worry about it growing back. OP, I know you dont have your PL, but I wanted to put this out there.

I agree with what you just said. I did this in my own yard a year ago due to the freaking stuff being a mosquito haven! 3 times and it was all crisp and brown. Hasn't come back yet.

MDLawn
04-05-2011, 02:44 PM
Roundup will kill ivy...I have used it multiple times on a few different varieties. You have to double, and sometimes triple apply as stated in the first post on this thread by me. that will kill the above surface growth...the plant will react by releasing carbs stored in the roots to "come out of Dormancy" so to speak. Spray it again once it begins to leaf (Always using surfactant) wait a couple of weeks and if it begins to put out again, spray it one last time, I have never had to do it more than three times...Then when you pull it out (not with a tiller :) ) you wont have to worry about it growing back. OP, I know you dont have your PL, but I wanted to put this out there.

No problem its great information for the masses, me included. I didnt mean to come off upset when people mentioned this. I just read it wrong and thought people kept telling me to use chemicals.

knox gsl
04-05-2011, 03:30 PM
Roundup will kill ivy...I have used it multiple times on a few different varieties. You have to double, and sometimes triple apply as stated in the first post on this thread by me. that will kill the above surface growth...the plant will react by releasing carbs stored in the roots to "come out of Dormancy" so to speak. Spray it again once it begins to leaf (Always using surfactant) wait a couple of weeks and if it begins to put out again, spray it one last time, I have never had to do it more than three times...Then when you pull it out (not with a tiller :) ) you wont have to worry about it growing back. OP, I know you dont have your PL, but I wanted to put this out there.

I had ivy in my yard similar to this and sprayed it with Gly (roundup) with no results. I only sis it once and didn't want to keep wasting money. I had a customer that wanted lawn where the ivy was so scalping and then power seeding was the fastest way to get it out.

To the OP if you do not wish to have grass growing where the ivy is now you may want to consider roundup there, as I give partial credit to weekly mowing as to the reason the ivy went away.

grassman88
04-05-2011, 06:29 PM
try covering it in a black tarp for like 2 weeks dont know if it would kill the ivy but it works on other plants.

indplstim
04-05-2011, 06:42 PM
They sell round up at home depot, really need a license for that? Or is the stuff the landscape stores sell different, more powerful? Am I missing something here?
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Leo the Landscaper
04-05-2011, 06:44 PM
They sell round up at home depot, really need a license for that? Or is the stuff the landscape stores sell different, more powerful? Am I missing something here?
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Yes. Does not matter if it is restricted use or not if you are putting down on someone else's property you need a license.
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indplstim
04-05-2011, 06:48 PM
On a related note, I did a job a few weeks ago, remover ivy that was growing about 20 ft up 2 trees, the roots on the bottom were around 2 inchs thick and completely covered the 10-n trunks, I cut about 5ft from the ground up the side of the trunk, and its still alive, will a lot of r/u (have license) hurt the tree if applied onto the trunk? I'm not paying someone in a boom truck to come pick the sh_t out, any ideas? I think the large roots left on the upper trunk still supply enough water to keep it alive
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indplstim
04-05-2011, 06:51 PM
Yes. Does not matter if it is restricted use or not if you are putting down on someone else's property you need a license.
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Lol thanx maybe I need to reread the label!
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Leo the Landscaper
04-05-2011, 06:53 PM
On a related note, I did a job a few weeks ago, remover ivy that was growing about 20 ft up 2 trees, the roots on the bottom were around 2 inchs thick and completely covered the 10-n trunks, I cut about 5ft from the ground up the side of the trunk, and its still alive, will a lot of r/u (have license) hurt the tree if applied onto the trunk? I'm not paying someone in a boom truck to come pick the sh_t out, any ideas? I think the large roots left on the upper trunk still supply enough water to keep it alive
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If you have license buy some RTU Tordon and apply to the bottom of the stems going up tree and the remaining trunks of ivy at ground.
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indplstim
04-05-2011, 06:56 PM
I guess I should have asked the sales rep at jd landscape that question 2 weeks ago thanx leo!
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indplstim
04-05-2011, 07:00 PM
Can I inject it somehow into the roots or spray only? They still want it under the trees just not in the tree, it already killed a 20 ft tree in the same area, the 2 remaining trees are already pretty choked out as it is, ill take a pic when I'm there next week or so, the dead ivy will prob never be taken out unless they want us to sub out to a tree service with a boom
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Leo the Landscaper
04-05-2011, 07:04 PM
Can I inject it somehow into the roots or spray only? They still want it under the trees just not in the tree, it already killed a 20 ft tree in the same area, the 2 remaining trees are already pretty choked out as it is, ill take a pic when I'm there next week or so, the dead ivy will prob never be taken out unless they want us to sub out to a tree service with a boom
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Don't apply to the lower stumps then. And if that is the case just let the top dye on its own. It will eventually
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knox gsl
04-05-2011, 08:55 PM
Don't apply to the lower stumps then. And if that is the case just let the top dye on its own. It will eventually
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He's right it will die slowly when summer gets here. Also where you cut it at the bottom make sure there is a gap between the 2 sections, it will grow back together.

Leo the Landscaper
04-05-2011, 08:59 PM
He's right it will die slowly when summer gets here. Also where you cut it at the bottom make sure there is a gap between the 2 sections, it will grow back together.

Good Point!!!
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indplstim
04-05-2011, 09:45 PM
He's right it will die slowly when summer gets here. Also where you cut it at the bottom make sure there is a gap between the 2 sections, it will grow back together.

There is about a 5 ft gap now, we will be maintaining it this year so we will keep up with it, not trying to hijack thid thread anywho...another method I've used to remove the unwanted ground cover is with a saw blade attachment on the weedeater, after its cleared to the dirt , then tilling up and raking out the remaining roots, I didn't have too much trouble with the tines getting wrapped up as the bulk of it is already gone, pretty time efficent, if you didn't want to rent a mini-ex, just keep an eye out afterwards for any sprouts coming back as with any method
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vencops
04-05-2011, 10:39 PM
Your chemicals are going to work better, applied to the leaf (and not the roots/stems).

Just an FYI to those other than the OP.

Leo the Landscaper
04-05-2011, 10:43 PM
Your chemicals are going to work better, applied to the leaf (and not the roots/stems).

Just an FYI to those other than the OP.

Not true in this case...reread the posts.
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Leo the Landscaper
04-05-2011, 10:55 PM
Not true in this case...reread the posts.
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vencops,

That was rude of me. I apologize for that way I just posted. This thread went off topic a bit. I meant to say that as a cut stump treatment you can better results than application via foliage. This references the "veered off topic" of the ivy in the tree.

Sorry for being so flippant.

vencops
04-06-2011, 07:30 AM
No problem. I just went through this at my own home. I learned a "little", getting rid of my ivy. I started by using a yard tool and a tractor. The "experts" told me it would come back. It did. I was told the chemicals would work better if the plant still had leaves. I honestly didn't try applying chemicals to the vines.

It still took almost a year to FULLY eradicate this plant (ivy).

Just giving my exp.. Good luck.