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TigerJon73
04-14-2011, 10:30 AM
Hello,

I live in Missouri and have a TTF lawn. I have two areas in my yard that never look quite as good as the rest of the lawn...right next to two different trees. I am wondering if it is due to the trees soaking up most of the water in the vicinity and leaving little left for the grass. I have a 1-gallon jug of Earth Right I'm going to start spraying on the areas to see if it helps any (because I have noticed that said areas are not soft but hard dirt). If I am on the right track, is there anything I can do to alleviate this problem? Thanks for any help.
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RigglePLC
04-14-2011, 01:03 PM
If therre is a semi-circular area south of the tree during hot late summer--then yes. This is called "root burn". The tree roots rob moisture from the soil on the south side of trees (where the sun is most intense).

TigerJon73
04-14-2011, 03:55 PM
That is pretty much our case (definitely more so in the summer; right now more towered the west side of each tree). Is there anything I can do to help the situation? A lady that works for a customer of mine said something one time about taking 1/2" PVC about 2 feet in length, drilling holes in them the entire length, and driving them into the ground in the problem areas. Anything to this? Thanks!
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Smallaxe
04-15-2011, 09:05 AM
When competing with tree roots, it is helpful to mulch mow and possibly a sprinkler for those areas to run a little more often...

TigerJon73
04-15-2011, 09:29 PM
I hammered four 1/2" x 2.5' pieces of sch. 40 PVC riddled with holes into the affected areas. We'll see if it helps. The lady I know swears by this method, but my only question is how will it work if the long plug is still inside the pipe?

Smallaxe
04-16-2011, 08:50 AM
Turn on a water hose and use water pressure to force the hole into the ground. When you see sand/gravel coming out you know you've got drainage... Now insert your pvc, w/o the plug...

RigglePLC
04-16-2011, 12:02 PM
The simple thing to do is first (most important) educate your customer as to what causes the problem. Roots pull moisture. Soil gets dry to deep levels. Then be sure to add extra water during the hot late summer period. Try the screwdriver test. Thrust it in. Four inches deep--too moist. 3 inches=fine. 2 inches=a little dry. One inch or less very dry. Best thing to do is add more time to sprinklers in that area. Or add larger nozzle on the sprinkler head--say go from 2 gal per min to 3 gal per min. A dollars worth of water can usually solve this problem. Save the tree, too. When you look at the cost of removing a tree--its cheap insurance. A dollar now--or $500 later.