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View Full Version : Is the Unique demo kit worth $600


Sutherland
04-29-2011, 04:21 PM
My local nursery has the Unique demo kit marked down from $1400 to $600, seems like a good deal. I was wondering if this kit has helped any of you sell jobs?

Lite4
04-30-2011, 01:58 AM
Not sure about their kit. I made my own.
8 pars cans, 2 par floods, 4 mr16 spots, 4 path lights, 2 mini wash lights, 10 kichler LED spots in varying wattages to show LED , halogen contrast. A 900 watt transformer prebuilt with quick connects. 5 spools of 12/2 cable. 125' long with an inline connector every 20'. I have 6 premade hubs with quick disconnects also. Everything rides in 2 rollaway totes.

There is no doubt the demo helps sell. sometimes it can be a pain but it generally pays off.
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Mark B
04-30-2011, 11:48 AM
I used my demo kit until I got confident in what I was doing. But I feel o lost a few jobs once they saw what I would do. Like the other thread that is going. My .02
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starry night
04-30-2011, 11:53 AM
[QUOTE=sleepyhead; But I feel I lost a few jobs once they saw what I would do. [/QUOTE]

Will you explain more what you mean.

Mark B
04-30-2011, 12:43 PM
They would see where to place the fixture, what there house would look like. Plus they are a pita to setup & remove.
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starry night
04-30-2011, 02:49 PM
They would see where to place the fixture, what there house would look like. Plus they are a pita to setup & remove.
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My fuzzy brain still doesn't get it.. Are you saying they just do it themselves after they see where they can place lights?

Mark B
05-01-2011, 02:33 PM
Pretty much. Between your fuzzy brain and my wonder explaining skills through the keyboard, it is hard for me to get my point across. It is more me then your fuzzy brain.

To me it is the time waisted driving to set it up, then time to remove it talk about the design blah blah blah stuff, and how the economy sucks. I feel now I am better off without the demo. I have not used it in a few years. But again I have been in a real crappy place in my life.

Right now life is so good, I am waiting for something to happen.
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jlouki01
05-01-2011, 08:43 PM
Tim,

When you demo do you leave it overnight to let them salivate a couple days?

If so do you make them responsible for 3000 worth of lighting equipment?

Mark B
05-01-2011, 08:46 PM
I would leave mine up for a few days. I started charging for the demo then taking the amount off of the total towards the end.
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Tomwilllight
05-01-2011, 11:26 PM
I don't like to leave a mock-up on site longer than one night. Too many things can happen to your work/equipment. I've had problems with a client bringing their electrician in to copy my work.

Besides the mock-up itself is not a thing of beauty; in the daylight they look sloppy. Better to get in and clear it out.

Tom

emby
05-02-2011, 12:44 AM
Hey Tom I like how you called it a "mock up" instead of a demo. In my opinion that is exactly what your doing when setting up with demo fixtures. Once you have the design then you are confirming your design or ideas by doing the mock up. During the mock up you will then proceed to zero in on every fixture ensuring that it has the proper beam spreads and wattages to achieve the effect. Write this down and once the client agrees your off to the races.

If the client decides not to proceed than the postive perspective is that you learned with hands on experience on how to complete your final aiming and complete the lighting as designed. I learned a lot from my mock ups just around my house when first starting out but especially when I came back from the LLI.
It really is part of the whole process.

Ken

David Gretzmier
05-02-2011, 01:44 AM
I have not done a demo yet this year and I have sold more jobs than ever. but I have one coming up. I am happy to set up a demo to sell a job, and often I sell more fixtures with a demo than without.

to me, the only fixtures I carry to demo are 20, mr-16 uplights and about 4 path lights. I have 2 600w trans and 6, 125f 10 guage ext cords with plugs every 10 feet.

Tomwilllight
05-02-2011, 02:15 PM
Demo VS Mock-up? Interesting question.

My wife and I talked it over at breakfast and she noted that she has created many DEMONSTRATION lighting projects over the 25 years she's been an active Lighting Designer and many of them are still functioning. At this moment, she's involved in "Demonstration Projects" with the Smithsonian and Getty Museums that demonstrate the use of LEDs to light art. These have been successful Demonstration Projects and she is confident they will lead to many museums adopting LEDs once the results are published.

In her practice, the goal of a Demonstration Project is to observe, review and document for publication to inform the wider Lighting Design community the results.

When we moved to Portland, I decided to install a Demonstration LSL design in our back yard. I intended it to be "permanent" but I have changed it as new product has become available.

For me, the purpose of a mock-up is often two-fold. First to give a prospective client an clear understanding of what I can do in their garden and second to test my ideas for that particular garden. If my ideas don't work, the client never sees them.

For me, a "Mock-up" is temporary, instructive and may eventually make me some money and the "Demonstration" is quasi-permanent, intended to test and teach and may eventually make me some money.

Clear as mud,
Tom

emby
05-02-2011, 11:43 PM
Thick as mud Tom but I totally understand. Thanks for clarifying. I like your thoughts as always.

Ken

Lite4
05-03-2011, 08:54 AM
Tim,

When you demo do you leave it overnight to let them salivate a couple days?

If so do you make them responsible for 3000 worth of lighting equipment?

I used to do that when I was living back in Idaho, but no longer. Now I meet the owners about 40 minutes before dark. I walk around the property with the homeowner and talk about the scope of the project for 20 minutes or so and then take about 20-25 minutes to set up a 15-20 light demo and write up the proposal. They come outside and see it, I hand them the proposal, they sign up, I take 10-15 minutes to put the demo back in the truck and I am off. Bing, bang, boom. It works well for me.

jlouki01
05-03-2011, 12:44 PM
Perfect. I am slowly putting my demo kit together by ordering a few extra peices on each here and there.

If the rain would stop we could actually just invest in demo kit and start using it right away.

We have had rain everyday almost for the last 30 days.

DanaMac
05-29-2011, 10:00 AM
When I was still doing lighting, I had two demo kits from Unique. I liked them, and liked that they already had the quick connect fittings installed. I now have most of those kits installed permanently at my house.

The YardSlayer
05-29-2011, 10:43 PM
Use to?? What happened??

The YardSlayer
05-29-2011, 10:45 PM
To answer the question to the thread Yes it is worth the 600. I spent 1400 for my unique demo kit. Its and investment the way i look at it. It all depends on how serious you are i guess.

DanaMac
06-01-2011, 10:22 AM
Use to?? What happened??

Irrigation service took over much faster. I find lighting a tough sell on existing landscapes here in CO. Plus I hate working late in the evening, when lighting needs to be looked at with the customer. Get me home by 4:00 or 5:00 and I'm happy.