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View Full Version : Ideas? lakeshore


olesonland
05-01-2011, 07:42 PM
Anyone have any good ideas, would also like some feedback.. this is in a zoning community that hates lakeshore terracing, so terracing is out the window, but their is major erosion and it needs to be addressed. I have a great plan and would like some feedback. ballpark estimating? hehe

Love these projects...the bank is about 35-40ft. on the rise and about the same on the run

PatriotLandscape
05-01-2011, 09:23 PM
Budget?
Posted via Mobile Device

olesonland
05-01-2011, 10:59 PM
not to concerned about the cost end, ive got that figured out.. looking more for some feedback on the concept itself...

Ecoscapes
05-02-2011, 06:49 AM
I'm doing my first lakeside job right now; had no idea about the permits needed fortunately I knew a guy who specialized in permits and design,. This is a simple pathway to the lake with a few stone steps, not as extensive as your project. I started excavating in the winter thinking I'd get a head start but as soon as spring came it was silt fence and erosion control, found out where the water drains off the hill at least, but next time I'll wait till things dry out in mid spring! Back on track now using the stone off home owner's property for small retaining walls, will be installing a hard-pak pathway for golf cart use.
You have some major retaining walls, what kind of stone will be used? Is that a room where the doorway is? That would be tough installing the door into the retaining walls, doable, but the structural integrity have to be top notch! Proper longterm drainage would be my concern with that project. I'd through in a few boulders or bigger stones if going with natural stone for stability.

olesonland
05-02-2011, 09:33 AM
great reply ecoscapes, the room would be poured concrete with major footing support and engineering. the rip rap will be done with native stone, the little toe wall behind rip rap will be done with either boulders or poured walls then the rest is so called ecoscaping... we would be mass planting both for visual appeal and also erosion prevention and control. what Does the plant layout do for your eye?... i guess that is the real question..

PSUhardscaper
05-02-2011, 07:05 PM
Although it depends on your client's wants, I would recommend a less formal and less symmetrical planting design. Remember, this is a lakeside, and you want your landscape design to help blend the house (and other man-made things) into the surrounding natural landscape. What you have come up with may make it stick out too much. Consider more mass plantings of native material, and less "lines" of plants.

robtown
05-02-2011, 07:12 PM
I like the concept but would incorporate a grass style handicap ramp on either side of the staircase. Approx 9 ft wide nice easy slope. It will give access for mowing, moving material and a additional area to walk around.
You can mail me a consultation check if you use the idea..... bahaaaa good luck looks like a fun project.

olesonland
05-02-2011, 07:35 PM
great input, i see your point from a mowers standpoint robtown. the problem is that if the snow were gone in the first picture you would see that the walls are existing boulder walls, which are in terrible shape and are not to be replaced (tough sell for some reason). so if i begin to repair one spot i will not be able to match the subpar quality of the rest(would be like replacing 20% of your shingles.) might now look so good.

Anyways-- the concept is to draw the eye into the home that stands behind, it is a showpiece of a home and zoning will not allow any lakeshore terracing of the bank, so visually it is suppose to draw the eye inward. i like the idea of natural, but for the cost natural does not give that much bang for the buck.

great thoughts

SunriseGardens
05-07-2011, 02:44 PM
In wisconsin on lake fronts, we need to contact either the municiple building inspector or county zoning guy, and the DNR. We also have to create erosion control plans and purchase a erosion control permit. As well as lakeshore landscaping permits. That being said, make sure that you contact any and all officials that may be involved with the permit process for the project.

Maybe replace the boulder walls with Wisconsin Outcropping stone. It has a wide footprint and covers 6 sf per ton. Pricey but stable and in Iowa it would stand out.

Keep in mind maintenance, the more varieties of plants you go with, the harder it will be to keep it looking nice.

Also, is the rip rap on the shore in good shape, or does it need to be redone, now would be the time to make adjustments and work your way out from there.

Adam

olesonland
05-08-2011, 12:50 AM
rip rap is going to be replaced, we have to go through the same permit process. No manufactured block allowed. we have done 2.6 miles of shoreline restoration. thanks for the input.. wisconsin stone will not be permited.

SunriseGardens
05-08-2011, 11:15 PM
Well, it sounds like you have it all figured out. Good Luck.

Budlightshooter
05-09-2011, 08:03 AM
Where is the erosion taking place?

Budlightshooter
05-09-2011, 08:15 AM
Also pouring the walls for a non conforming structure in the dnr 35ft set back, will permits be available? I think like the previous poster, the design is off. I would lean more to the natural side of things, less formality. Are you planning to clear cut that side and then reinstall plant material and mulch? I would highly advise against it. Its only going to speed up erosion.

Cloud9Landscapes
05-11-2011, 12:06 AM
In California you are required to perform a geological survey before doing any sort of hillside terracing.

SunriseGardens
05-11-2011, 10:06 PM
Any hillside terracing? For example a 4' retaining wall in somebodies backyard with no water in sight? How much does something survey like that cost?

Adam