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View Full Version : Have I been using the wrong kind of fuel for my weedwacker and blower?


pattytastik
05-27-2011, 04:17 PM
I just read somewhere something that makes me wonder if over the years I have been using the wrong gas mixture. What I use now is 87 octane mixed with powerblend oil (made by echo) for my echo srm weedwacker and my pb-500 blower and echo hedger. Should it be 89 octane instead of 87?

Thanks
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Birdhunter1
05-27-2011, 04:41 PM
6 years ago i got into internet forums and read I should be using high octane fuels in my 2 stroke Stihl equipment, I guess my Stihl equipment didn't get the memo either because it has always run well.

I am still using 87 octane, my dad is still using 87 octane on his Echo and Stihl stuff. I use the Stihl 2 stroke oil, he uses the Echo, we each uses each others fuel cans when the are handier to us (Shhh don't tell anyone).

pattytastik
05-27-2011, 05:15 PM
Great! I was nervous that I was slowly deteriorating my equipment. I'm glad that what I am using is acceptable.

Charles
05-27-2011, 07:31 PM
89 octane is what the manufacturers recommend. Never use 87 in lawn equipment.

Km81
05-27-2011, 07:34 PM
87 Octane was fine until the ethanol came into play. All manufacturers recommend 89 or higher now.

Penncare
05-27-2011, 07:38 PM
I like to run 105 racing fuel in mine. Once cut down a three inch pine tree with it. Really I think it makes little difference at all.

FlemingIslandLawnService
05-27-2011, 07:40 PM
Great! I was nervous that I was slowly deteriorating my equipment. I'm glad that what I am using is acceptable.

You might actually be doing your engine some harm. 89 at the minimum is recommended but I always go with premium to make my equipment last longer. I always put 87 in my truck though because automobiles don't have such small and sensitive engines like trimmers do

pattytastik
05-27-2011, 07:51 PM
OK so i guess i'll switch to 89 octane. Walk behinds still use 87 right?

FlemingIslandLawnService
05-27-2011, 08:03 PM
OK so i guess i'll switch to 89 octane. Walk behinds still use 87 right?

yes and yes. also, just making sure that you are aware that you need to mix in 2 cycle oil for your trimmers/edgers/blowers, but not for your lawn mowers

pattytastik
05-27-2011, 08:06 PM
haha of course. I use the powerblend made by echo. I know i sound like a newbie but i was looking over the manual (found it in the bottom of a drawer) and I was shocked to see it say 89 as opposed to 87.

FlemingIslandLawnService
05-27-2011, 08:09 PM
haha of course. I use the powerblend made by echo. I know i sound like a newbie but i was looking over the manual (found it in the bottom of a drawer) and I was shocked to see it say 89 as opposed to 87.

Yeah I guess dealers should always tell you that stuff when you buy equipment because nobody is going to read that huge user manual

FlemingIslandLawnService
05-27-2011, 08:11 PM
come to think of it, dealers probably don't tell you that stuff on purpose so that your engine breaks down and you either have to buy a new trimmer from them or pay them to repair it

RHR101
05-27-2011, 08:15 PM
KM81 hit it on the head. I spoke to an Echo rep. about this and he said since ethanol, they recommend 89 octane minimum in all their handhelds.

Mikegyver
05-27-2011, 09:33 PM
87 in all the big mowers and 21s, and whatever I can afford in the handhelds, right now we are on 93 and everything is running good.
mike

B&GLandscaping
05-27-2011, 09:34 PM
It didn't matter what octane for my Stihl equipment. Because there was too much ethanol in the fuel (out of my control) and it completely trashed my chainsaw...scratched the piston and seized the rings. I would recommend getting a ethanol tester and testing your local gas stations for the amount of ethanol. This could come in handy down the road so you don't ruin equipment....unlike what happened to me. :-(

Patriot Services
05-27-2011, 09:37 PM
Ethanol additive and 93 octane. Two strokes run so hot you will never hear the detonation that could be destroying them.
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Mikegyver
05-27-2011, 09:38 PM
Where do you get ethanol testers? All the gas here has it in it.
mike

B&GLandscaping
05-27-2011, 09:42 PM
My Stihl dealer had them. It just a little tub you put gas in and shake it up and the gas or water will expand telling you how much % ethanol is that station. I now know what gas stations to use or not use.

D&K Lawns
05-27-2011, 09:48 PM
I use a brand called SEF. It comes mixed and is 94 octane. Equipment runs awesome and it does not leave much of a smell. It does smell a little like racing fuel. I love the stuff.

Skidpad
05-27-2011, 10:18 PM
I use a brand called SEF. It comes mixed and is 94 octane. Equipment runs awesome and it does not leave much of a smell. It does smell a little like racing fuel. I love the stuff.
Yup, SEF is part of VP Racing Fuels. The smell alone is indicative of something other than normal gasoline from the gas station.

There's another brand called Trufuel that is made with the same idea in mind -no ethanol, high octane/pure gas, synthetic oil, etc. I bought a couple of cans last weekend and although it hasn't helped the cold engine lean condition on my blower (gotta take the carb apart and investigate), it does run great otherwise in my blower, trimmer, and chain saw. Only long-term use will determine if the claims are substantiated - I don't use enough for the premium pricing to be a factor, so I plan to keep using it and see how it does.

Sorry about the thread hijack...

dboyd351
05-27-2011, 10:20 PM
You might be able to get gas without ethanol.
Try this:
http://pure-gas.org/

Skidpad
05-27-2011, 10:50 PM
You might be able to get gas without ethanol.
Try this:
http://pure-gas.org/
Tried the other day - the only stations within easy distance of me are inaccurate; will keep trying though. Thx

rlitman
05-27-2011, 11:04 PM
I like to run 105 racing fuel in mine. Once cut down a three inch pine tree with it.

With a string trimmer!
Oh, wait, that was three inches tall.

Precedence
05-27-2011, 11:15 PM
Octane rating relates to just how much a fuel can be compressed before igniting. The higher the number, the less likely it is to ignite under pressure. So if the compression ratios on your equipment are high then trying to use low octane fuel will cause the engine to knock or ping because the fuel is igniting before it is fully compressed.

Mikegyver
05-27-2011, 11:52 PM
Ya the 130 has been pinging lately I wondered what that was.
mike

R&T Services
05-28-2011, 02:11 PM
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ed2hess
05-28-2011, 08:18 PM
You might actually be doing your engine some harm. 89 at the minimum is recommended but I always go with premium to make my equipment last longer. I always put 87 in my truck though because automobiles don't have such small and sensitive engines like trimmers do

I don't know about these 2 stoke engines being sensitive I think it doesn't make any difference on them.

dishboy
05-29-2011, 10:21 AM
I have always ran 91 octane , and 85 in the mowers. Just switched to 87 and noticed no difference in performance or any detonation. If you live at higher elevations using lower octane may work fine.

Sammy
05-29-2011, 11:17 AM
I use 89 octane until it gets hot and dry out. Then I go to the 93 octane so the 2-cycle runs better in hot weather.

DLCS
05-29-2011, 12:45 PM
I have never used anything but 87 in lawn equipment. I have some 2 strokes that are 10 years old and still run great. Never siezed a engine.