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View Full Version : Disappointed in life of PTO clutch


SLMGT
05-27-2011, 10:09 PM
I have a 60" Hustler Super Z with a 31 hp Kawasaki with just over 500 hours. I have owned the mower for 2 years 8 months and have just had to replace the clutch. I would have thought the clutch would have lasted for at least 1000 hours. The dealer inquired about Hustler possibly replacing the clutch but was told that the 2 year warranty had passed and Hustler would not replace the clutch. The dealer was told that life of clutch could vary due to moisture exposure and cutting conditions. The mower is kept in an enclosed trailer and is used to cut lawns not cow pastures or hay fields. In reading the owners manual it appears that Hustler figures the average mower used for business will probably put on 500 hours per year. I'm pretty disappointed in the clutch going after only 500 hours over 2 seasons. How many hours are most of you getting out of your clutches? I'm asking the questions for both Hustlers owners and owners of other brands. I appreciate any input. :confused:

ProStreetCamaro
05-27-2011, 10:16 PM
I have a 60" Hustler Super Z with a 31 hp Kawasaki with just over 500 hours. I have owned the mower for 2 years 8 months and have just had to replace the clutch. I would have thought the clutch would have lasted for at least 1000 hours. The dealer inquired about Hustler possibly replacing the clutch but was told that the 2 year warranty had passed and Hustler would not replace the clutch. The dealer was told that life of clutch could vary due to moisture exposure and cutting conditions. The mower is kept in an enclosed trailer and is used to cut lawns not cow pastures or hay fields. In reading the owners manual it appears that Hustler figures the average mower used for business will probably put on 500 hours per year. I'm pretty disappointed in the clutch going after only 500 hours over 2 seasons. How many hours are most of you getting out of your clutches? I'm asking the questions for both Hustlers owners and owners of other brands. I appreciate any input. :confused:


Our lazer has 2500 hours on original clutch and our 34Z has 1800 on original clutch and our 160Z has 1100 on original clutch.

docshank
05-27-2011, 10:17 PM
Had to replace the clutch on my Grasshopper 721D at a little over 2500 hours.

docshank

sgrenier24
05-28-2011, 12:40 AM
Just replaced mine today on a Lazer Z with 1600 hours.
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LaLawnGuy
05-28-2011, 01:10 AM
Hustler Z-334 hrs. Ferris 1500-373 hrs. Bearing on Hustler, wires broke on Ferris. Not happy about either.
Posted via Mobile Device

MOturkey
05-28-2011, 01:10 AM
Not to be a smarty pants, but do you engage the clutch at full throttle?

StanWilhite
05-28-2011, 01:25 AM
Not to be a smarty pants, but do you engage the clutch at full throttle?

That was the question I was going to ask. Also, do you disengage at full throttle? I learned (through some of the good folks on this site) that there is a braking system on the PTO that stops it when it's disengaged. The faster the engine is turning when the PTO is disengaged, the faster it wears out. I let my engine/deck slow to idle before disengaging.
Stan

LaLawnGuy
05-28-2011, 01:35 AM
Not to be a smarty pants, but do you engage the clutch at full throttle?
Posted via Mobile Device
I do, but both of these were obtained through buy-outs. I'll change that if I need to.

Lawn Specialties
05-28-2011, 01:56 AM
I have a wb with 1700 hrs that is on it's 3rd clutch and I have a Z with 1400 hrs and it's still on the original. While I try to take it easy on mine and not engage them at full throttle I'm not convinced that has much to do with mine failing.They didn't get week like they were worn out. They developed shorts so basically they were fine one minute and junk the next. Ive pretty much figured out clutches are a maintenance item. It's not if they fail but when.

Richard Martin
05-28-2011, 05:10 AM
There is a shim in the clutch that can be removed to lengthen the service life of Hustler clutches. If you don't have the service manual it can be found here: http://www.hustlerturf.com/images/product_manuals/113957.pdf. The procedure can be found on pages 5-10 and 5-11.

heather lawn sp
05-28-2011, 07:59 AM
25 hp Deere
2 years 500 hours a clutch
'combat mowing' 10 acres of school yards a day 'sticks out'

Mowbizz
05-28-2011, 02:11 PM
Just replaced my Lazer HP w/23 Kawasaki at 600 hours but I do mow some nasty field type acreage with tall grass on a steep incline...Just wore it out I guess...

SLMGT
05-28-2011, 07:41 PM
I appreciate the information and suggestions. We engage the PTO at about half throttle and disengage at between half and idle. Early replacement increases the operating costs by about 50 cents an operating hour more than I had figured on. Once again, I appreciate the input.:usflag:

ed2hess
05-28-2011, 07:57 PM
I think turning the thing off and on is a factor. I happened to catch one of our guys turing it off way toooo often. Scag just went at 2000 hrs the good part it only cost $212.

Runner
05-29-2011, 04:16 AM
Exactly...It is not the hours on the clutch,...it is the amount of cycles.

nathannc
05-29-2011, 05:03 AM
Hustler Z-334 hrs. Ferris 1500-373 hrs. Bearing on Hustler, wires broke on Ferris. Not happy about either.
Posted via Mobile Device

Had the same thing happen to my clutch on a Ferris I own. The wire had broken actually inside the rubber grommet leading into the clutch. With nothing to lose, and perhaps well over $300.00 to save, I did the following.

First, I stuck a good soldering iron down in to the grommet where the wire went into the clutch, barely able to touch the stub of wire that was still there. I let it heat up to where there was a lot of smoke coming from the grommet itself. Then, I applied solder against the shaft just above the tip which was buried in the grommet and let it slide down into the grommet hole hopefully making contact with the stub of wire that was left. I removed the soldering iron and kept the solder molten for a few moments, long enough to put new wire in and, to improve my chances that the solder made a good connection.

After making sure I had a solid connection by testing the operation of the clutch, I minimized the chances of the wire breaking again at that point by siliconing a loop of the new wire firmly next to where I made the repair. Next I put slip on electrical connectors on both wires leading to the clutch. I put them near the clutch in the area where the wires were most likely to get hung on something such as a stick which was probably what led to the wire getting broke in the first place. My thinking was that if something hung up on the wires, the electrical connectors would come loose before breaking the wires.

Lastly, I made sure the wires were tucked back out of the way of any yard debris that might catch on to them.

The repair has lasted over a hundred hours thus far.

heather lawn sp
05-29-2011, 08:48 AM
Had the same thing happen to my clutch on a Ferris I own. The wire had broken actually inside the rubber grommet leading into the clutch. With nothing to lose, and perhaps well over $300.00 to save, I did the following.

First, I stuck a good soldering iron down in to the grommet where the wire went into the clutch, barely able to touch the stub of wire that was still there. I let it heat up to where there was a lot of smoke coming from the grommet itself. Then, I applied solder against the shaft just above the tip which was buried in the grommet and let it slide down into the grommet hole hopefully making contact with the stub of wire that was left. I removed the soldering iron and kept the solder molten for a few moments, long enough to put new wire in and, to improve my chances that the solder made a good connection.

After making sure I had a solid connection by testing the operation of the clutch, I minimized the chances of the wire breaking again at that point by siliconing a loop of the new wire firmly next to where I made the repair. Next I put slip on electrical connectors on both wires leading to the clutch. I put them near the clutch in the area where the wires were most likely to get hung on something such as a stick which was probably what led to the wire getting broke in the first place. My thinking was that if something hung up on the wires, the electrical connectors would come loose before breaking the wires.

Lastly, I made sure the wires were tucked back out of the way of any yard debris that might catch on to them.

The repair has lasted over a hundred hours thus far.

A man after my own heart

FIX THE UN-FIXABLE

Ours just failed again this week-end, working on after-market sourcing now

Kelly's Landscaping
05-30-2011, 03:32 PM
It's not the hours its how often its engaged and disengaged there is a set life on anything when you go over it will fail. If you cut a lot of small lawns you may only cut for 10 mins and then turn the blades off. That would be 6 times and hour times 500 hours that's 3000 cycles. We mow both large and small lawns but we also bag a very large number of them. So we can turn the blades off and on 10 times an hour on average so now your 500 hours is 5000 cycles. We have gotten as much as 1100 hours on clutches and as few as 500 depends on the mower size and what it was used for the more off and on use the few hours it lasted.

StanWilhite
05-30-2011, 03:40 PM
It's not the hours its how often its engaged and disengaged there is a set life on anything when you go over it will fail. If you cut a lot of small lawns you may only cut for 10 mins and then turn the blades off. That would be 6 times and hour times 500 hours that's 3000 cycles. We mow both large and small lawns but we also bag a very large number of them. So we can turn the blades off and on 10 times an hour on average so now your 500 hours is 5000 cycles. We have gotten as much as 1100 hours on clutches and as few as 500 depends on the mower size and what it was used for the more off and on use the few hours it lasted.

I agree 100%. That is something I forgot to add in my reply. The life of a PTO clutch depends on how many times it's cycled, and at what RPM it's engaged and disengaged.