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View Full Version : Manual clutch for mowers?


Bunton Guy
05-29-2011, 07:08 PM
Why not more manual clutches for mowers? I remember dixie chopper doing this. Was there more negatives then positives? I remember being able to run double blades because of this.

Seems like it would be a win win no need to worry about replacing electric clutches.

wvaughn7
05-29-2011, 07:17 PM
I also think this would be a great thing to do. Our old walkbehind has a manual PTO and I love it. The zero turn on the other hand has an electric clutch and it shakes the whole machine when engaged. The manual clutch just seems to be smoother.

93Chevy
05-29-2011, 07:42 PM
The nice thing about a manual clutch is that you can kinda "ease" it into engagement. With an electric, it's BAM right now. Seems like it's harder on the machine, but easier to operate. But I'm probably wrong.

Bunton Guy
05-29-2011, 07:44 PM
A couple of our old bunton hydro walk behinds always had manual pto....never had issues.

Mikegyver
05-29-2011, 09:04 PM
TTHP has it...at least the not so new ones do...
mike

StanWilhite
05-29-2011, 09:14 PM
Why not more manual clutches for mowers? I remember dixie chopper doing this. Was there more negatives then positives? I remember being able to run double blades because of this.

Seems like it would be a win win no need to worry about replacing electric clutches.

I wondered the same thing, so we had a detailed discussion about this a year or two back. The reason for the electric pto is the ability it has to stop the blades from spinning in 3 or 4 seconds (utilizing a braking system) when the blades are disengaged . It's not mandatory, but for safety reasons, most manufacturers do it.

This is the reason you shouldn't disengage the pto at any speed other than idle or just above (wears the engaging/braking system out).

Stan

Hawkshot99
05-29-2011, 10:07 PM
I wondered the same thing, so we had a detailed discussion about this a year or two back. The reason for the electric pto is the ability it has to stop the blades from spinning in 3 or 4 seconds (utilizing a braking system) when the blades are disengaged . It's not mandatory, but for safety reasons, most manufacturers do it.

This is the reason you shouldn't disengage the pto at any speed other than idle or just above (wears the engaging/braking system out).

Stan

I have a Exmark Viking that has a Manuel PTO and I like it. It saves belts and obviously clutches being able to ease the blades on.

When I hit the PTO off the blades shut off real quick. Never timed it, but I would say right in that 3-4 second range. The blade farthest from the discharge does have a break on it that is attached to the PTO shaft so it engages as soon as the blades are turned off.

flatlander42
05-29-2011, 10:45 PM
My navigator has a manual pto. It also has a big "brake pad" that is acutally right on the blade idler pully. Let off of the blades and the brake just stops it, magic really.

Now I think of it....it needs a new pad.

My walker on the other hand...I don't think It has any type of brake, unless it is inside of the clutch assembly. *also manual*

StanWilhite
06-01-2011, 07:20 PM
I wondered the same thing, so we had a detailed discussion about this a year or two back. The reason for the electric pto is the ability it has to stop the blades from spinning in 3 or 4 seconds (utilizing a braking system) when the blades are disengaged . It's not mandatory, but for safety reasons, most manufacturers do it.

This is the reason you shouldn't disengage the pto at any speed other than idle or just above (wears the engaging/braking system out).

Stan

I must have been experiencing a "brain fart" we older folks get when I posted this post.

I forgot to mention what is probably the main reason for the electric pto, and that is safety switches. With a manual pto safety switches (seat, parking brake, neutral) have to kill the engine instead of just the deck.

Stan

ncls
06-16-2011, 03:14 AM
On my Bad Boy riders, I go to half throttle to engage the blades, then ramp it up to full throttle, then cut at full speed.....

tuffram
06-16-2011, 08:20 AM
All Kubota ZTR use manual clutches and shaft driven decks very smooth blade engagement from full throttle.

G780
06-16-2011, 09:45 AM
I'm happy I can find more equpiment without a clutch. Our employees seen to burn them out and grind them down a lot faster.

topsites
06-16-2011, 10:22 AM
There is no such thing as a manual clutch, all clutches are electric (and thus semi-automatic).

tuffram
06-16-2011, 10:31 AM
There is no such thing as a manual clutch, all clutches are electric (and thus semi-automatic).

Kubota uses a Hydraulic Independent PTO Clutch with wet multi disks it is engaged by moving a lever on the right hand side 6 inches forward to engage the blades and is spring loaded when it is disengaged. There is nothing electric about it is as manual as it gets these days.

flatlander42
06-16-2011, 12:53 PM
There is no such thing as a manual clutch, all clutches are electric (and thus semi-automatic).

that's weird...my navigator sure does look manual to me. belts and pullys only....and a large lever!


unless you are talking about newer mowers...then I would not know

Hawkshot99
06-16-2011, 02:22 PM
There is no such thing as a manual clutch, all clutches are electric (and thus semi-automatic).

My Exmark is 100% manual. You pull a handle back which moves a pulley on top of the deck tightening the deck belt and making the blades spin. There is nothing electric about it, other than the safety switch that kills the engine if the parking break is on.