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JShe8918
06-04-2011, 10:44 PM
I planted 6 dwarf burford hollies three weeks ago. They looked beautiful and lustorous. Three of them started dropping leaves. The leaves falling turned brown. I have looked at them and they do have scale BUT that wouldn't cause the leaves to fall off. They turned brown and just dropped to the ground. I imediately dug one of them up to find the hole was holding water. It is a clay base. This made me think wet fet. So i dug a drainage hole in the bottom of the hole and filled it with sand and rock. Then widened the hole. I planted with good top soil and a little sand. I went back to check on the new replacements to find that they are doing the same thing. The green berries are shriveling and begining to discolor. The new plants have black spots on the leaves and scale once again. What does everyone think it may be? I will upload some photo's her in a few minutes.


Thanks,
Jonathan

White Gardens
06-05-2011, 11:33 AM
Not familiar with your area, but wet feet is my first guess. We've been having major problems with holly's and other evergreens the last 4 years due to all the rain we've had.

You did the right thing by digging holes underneath them and widening the hole. The problem now is probably shock from re-digging them.

From my experience, it's hard to get hollys back into shape after they've deteriorated.

JShe8918
06-05-2011, 01:25 PM
Here is some cruddy iphone pictures. White gardens thank you for your reply. I'm still with you on the wet feet. Btw all of your stuff is gorgeous.


http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x156/Jonathan818_2007/IMG_0996.jpghttp://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x156/Jonathan818_2007/IMG_0993.jpghttp://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x156/Jonathan818_2007/IMG_0992.jpghttp://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x156/Jonathan818_2007/IMG_0991.jpg

JShe8918
06-05-2011, 01:26 PM
Sorry uploaded one to many pictures. The first on is a carrisa holly at another jobsite doing the same thing. And since i underbid by mistake i didn't focus on root wrap as much as i should as you can tell.

White Gardens
06-05-2011, 01:31 PM
Without seeing a picture at distance towards the house, I would say the grade could use a bit of help. Whenever I do an install of a bed or plants I always try to make a pronounced grade away from the house to compensate for settling and natural turf building that will raise the grade of the lawn over 50+years.

One pic showed the crawl-space vent and it looks like you've got some room to go up 3-4 inches with soil.

The one holly you popped looked to be toast, the other ones look like they can be salvaged with a little TLC.

Thanks for the compliment BTW. Thumbs Up I've still got some room for improvement though and every year I feel I get a bit better.

White Gardens
06-05-2011, 01:34 PM
I also just checked on the specs for that holly and I'd say you need to pull them out another 3 feet away from the foundation.

http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/1498/dwarf-burford-holly.php

Potentially up to 6' tall and wide.

..

JShe8918
06-05-2011, 01:41 PM
http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x156/Jonathan818_2007/IMG_0785.jpg

I absolutley agree. As you can see it is almost perfectly flat. There is a small drainage area going around the base of the house. Initially i suggested a to bring in some topsoil and do some grading for better drainage however he didn't want to do that. He wanted to spend no more money than this. Well i got caught up in getting the job because it was going to be one of my best i have done. However in the midst of it i cut alot of profit and wound up with my labor cost and materials almost being what i get paid. I have a sure fire way of bidding to make a profit however they are long time family friends and i made an error in bidding. I under bid the black lava by 86 bags at $10 a pop.

JShe8918
06-05-2011, 01:45 PM
Yes they do get some size to them. We plan on maintaining them at about the current height, but maintain them into a hedge. However i do know the roots will continue to grow out further and further. Which could potentially get to the foundation but doubtfully. With a little root pruning on that side they will hardly grow that direction i figure.

White Gardens
06-05-2011, 01:48 PM
I'd just run away if you can, but I know it can be touchy when you know the person.

Nothing is going to grow very well there without throwing even a little bit of money at it.

In the future, if price is a factor, I would drive the point home about at least establishing the beds and correcting the grade, even if means not putting down rock mulch/fabric and just hardwood mulch with no fabric.

Then at a later time, if the HO wants to upgrade to a rock bed and better edging, then they have that option.

JShe8918
06-05-2011, 02:04 PM
Good point.

allinearth
06-05-2011, 07:16 PM
Sorry uploaded one to many pictures. The first on is a carrisa holly at another jobsite doing the same thing. And since i underbid by mistake i didn't focus on root wrap as much as i should as you can tell.

The 1st pic is a dwarf gardenia. In a poor drainage situation and especially clay soil, plant the plant high. If you must amend the soil you should do the whole area not just the hole. The amended soil accepts water more easily and obviously it isn't draining out. I doubt the drainage hole you dug will be much benefit.

JShe8918
06-05-2011, 10:45 PM
And the day keeps getting worse. Thanks for the I put guys. It is all appreciated. As if this want enough to get me worked up today i was watering my plants for my next job to find that they are mostly trash now. The three hour drive home in 100 degree weather tormented them. The shade cloth must have gotten way hot. 30 daylillys, 14 lantana, 5 lace cap hydrangeas, 3 knock out roses, and one muhley grass aren't usable. I can salvage them and use them at another job in a few weeks but not Tomorrow and no where near to get them. I'm beginning to think I should have kept my full time job. I didn't consider myself a newbie but I am certainly making all of the stupid mistakes that they do.
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White Gardens
06-05-2011, 10:50 PM
And the day keeps getting worse. Thanks for the I put guys. It is all appreciated. As if this want enough to get me worked up today i was watering my plants for my next job to find that they are mostly trash now. The three hour drive home in 100 degree weather tormented them. The shade cloth must have gotten way hot. 30 daylillys, 14 lantana, 5 lace cap hydrangeas, 3 knock out roses, and one muhley grass aren't usable. I can salvage them and use them at another job in a few weeks but not Tomorrow and no where near to get them. I'm beginning to think I should have kept my full time job. I didn't consider myself a newbie but I am certainly making all of the stupid mistakes that they do.
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Ahhhh, the trappings of landscaping. Everyone thinks there is more money in it, and that might be true, but Murphy's law generally rules and that will kill production and profits.

Chin up, it's all a learning experience. I still make mistakes and have thought like you. All you can do is power through and stay positive.