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casey humphrey
06-06-2011, 11:28 AM
I picked up a new customer this weekend her yard was a forest!! I told her my price we agreed on the moweing of every two weeks.

I gave her a price on her very overgrown hedges. She stated that is to high maybe I will just do a few than. I said let me know which ones you want done. Now I get a phone call she stated all I can afford is 200.00 dollars could you do them all for that price? The original price was 300.00 with a 75.00 disposal fee. It is atleast a 6 hour job! I said that is my final price I can not go any lower than that.

Residential sucks!!! For the past year I have a handfull of residential and they seem to think my price is up for discusion. How do you tell these people in a nice way that is my price deal with it?

I love commercial ya give them a price either they like it or not. It seems they understand we don't do this for charity. I just show up every week give the property 110% of my time and detail and leave.

tlc1994
06-06-2011, 11:34 AM
We have the ability to decide who we choose to work for. Simply, if you and the customer can't meet a consensus, then it is best to part ways before any animosity yields.

tuffram
06-06-2011, 11:45 AM
I have had this happen a few times. They call you out to give them an estimate then when you give it to them; they try to negotiate the price with you. I hate it when this happens I just politely tell them the price I give you is my best estimate for the work you requested me to quote you a price for the price is non-negotiable.

weeze
06-06-2011, 11:50 AM
just tell them to check with someone else for trimming the hedges because you can't do it for that price.

rem-md
06-06-2011, 11:51 AM
Residential sucks!!! For the past year I have a handfull of residential and they seem to think my price is up for discusion. How do you tell these people in a nice way that is my price deal with it?

You don't if you want to stay in business. Almost everything in business is negotiable. Comes with the territory. I'll bet you don't go into the car dealer and take their first price offer. I'm not comparing a $30,000 car to a $300 service - just sayin....

tuffram
06-06-2011, 11:59 AM
You don't if you want to stay in business. Almost everything in business is negotiable. Comes with the territory. I'll bet you don't go into the car dealer and take their first price offer. I'm not comparing a $30,000 car to a $300 service - just sayin....

If you give them, the best price you can from the beginning and tell them this is the best price I can give you there is no negotiation for me to do. If a car dealer would do this and you know the price is fair you would buy it.

casey humphrey
06-06-2011, 01:06 PM
The whole car thing is a bad example. They are a huge corperations that can AFFORD to take that hit and than write the car off as LOST sales and we the AMERICAN people get to pay for it in the long run. My dad worked for a ford dealership as a mechanic for 20 years.If I was bidding a 30k lawn contract THAN I am open for discusion than on that contract I could afford to DISCUSS the price and the work involved Just sayn.

mowerbrad
06-06-2011, 01:27 PM
You're going to have customers try to get your price down no matter what. But I find it funny that lawn care is one particular industry that customers really try to negotiate prices, you don't see customers trying to talk the heating and cooling guy down on his service call price or the electrician's service call rate.

Just recently I had a person call to get a price on weekly lawn mowing. I had worked for this person a couple years ago before they moved. Well, they ended up moving back to my area and moved just around the corner from my house. Husband calls me and asks me to come take a look at the yard when I get a chance and let him know what the price would be. I drive over (20 second drive from my house) on my way out, looked over the lawn and figured a price. Called the husband back and left a message with him, told him $27/week (It would take me 20 minutes to do and I had almost no drive time). Well the wife calls me back a day or two later and proceeds to tell me that the price I gave them seems awefully high and wants to know if I could do any better, like $20/week. I couldn't say no fast enough, I told her that $27 is the absolute best I can do and I will not go any lower. She tells me later that they will be going with the kid across the street.

When I give someone a price, that's my price, there is no negotiating it. I'm in business to actually make money and will not lower my price just because they can't afford to pay the price I gave.

casey humphrey
06-06-2011, 01:39 PM
I love this story MOWERBRAD. I get this all the time is 7 bucks really going to break the bank? I bet that kid doesn't have insurance and pay good old uncle sam his cut. Oh and this is the best part he probably lives with his parents. He does not have a morgage to pay HAHA

THG
06-06-2011, 01:40 PM
There is nothing wrong with sticking with your price but there is also nothing wrong with a customer asking for a lower price. Being able to say no professionally and explaining your answer goes a long way in the long run.

weeze
06-06-2011, 02:07 PM
this is what i always do...i get a figure in my head...thinking to myself i will do this yard from $40-$50...so i start off by telling them i'll do it for $50....some say ok...some say that's a little high can you do better?...so i walk around the yard a bit and i say $45?...then some accept that.....then some people are really really tight with their money and say they are gonna get other estimates or whatever...i tell them $40 is low as i can go...if they accept ok...if not then ok...i move on.

944own
06-06-2011, 03:24 PM
Bump it up a little if they bite then you win. If they beat you down then you get your original price and they feel like they got a deal.

casey humphrey
06-06-2011, 03:29 PM
944OWN I think I am going to start doing this idea!

Daily Lawn/Landscape
06-06-2011, 05:36 PM
So what you are telling me is, when you go buy a new piece of equipment, or anything for that matter, you don't ask for a better price? If you don't, I would love to see you coming, if I were the salesman. More money for me. :) I have commercial customers ask me quite often, but I still get the work. It's all about how you answer their question....... Always with another question. If your not sure how to do that, start reading some sales books. Not only are you the owner, you are the salesman, for your company.

James

BCL Services
06-06-2011, 05:56 PM
Residential does suck. No 2 ways about it. I have all but given up on doing it anymore. I used to do tons of it , but they are the cheapest and most scrutinizing clients around. I used to have about 30 residential accounts and have widdled those down to 3. Commercial clients for the most part are easy to please and don't nickel and dime you to death. There are too many guys out there willing to ***** their services out for dirt cheap to cater to the frugal residential clients. Until that changes, the residential scene will stay he same unless your lucky enough to get into select neighborhoods. In that case, you can usually get a good price for your work, but the people are still a pain in the a$$. But at least they pay good money for the job.

No, I have focused on medium sized commercial work and it has paid dividends monetarily and most definately there is a lot less stress from dealing with idiots who have no clue.....

Just my humble opinion of course :)

lukemelo216
06-06-2011, 06:29 PM
I agree with thg. Personally I would have said, unfortunately $300 is my bottom dollar on this project, if youre looking to only spend $200 this is what I would be able to do for you, and give them that option. Then say, either we can work out a payment for the remaining $100.00 or we can do those other shrubs later in the year for you. Especially if its a mowing customer, work with them.

If my customers are on a limited budget I tell them, hey we can do this amount right now, and Ill split the remainder up over the next month or something for you.

stan the man
06-06-2011, 06:34 PM
Bump it up a little if they bite then you win. If they beat you down then you get your original price and they feel like they got a deal.

that is what i do. on all my bids it works great for me.

Snapper Jack
06-06-2011, 06:38 PM
I agree with thg. Personally I would have said, unfortunately $300 is my bottom dollar on this project, if youre looking to only spend $200 this is what I would be able to do for you, and give them that option. Then say, either we can work out a payment for the remaining $100.00 or we can do those other shrubs later in the year for you. Especially if its a mowing customer, work with them.

If my customers are on a limited budget I tell them, hey we can do this amount right now, and Ill split the remainder up over the next month or something for you.

You've got the right business attitude,especially the way the economy is,some people are off worse than others and you should be willing to work with the customer.

FLAhaulboy
06-06-2011, 06:59 PM
I'd rather work for the homeowner over commercial any ole day. I do NOT negotiate, I quote a hourly rate+a haul off fee if they want the debris hauled away. I did a hedge & tree trimming job today...charged $85 per hr (7.32 hrs) + charged $200 to haul away the debris (a huge pile of limbs and construction debris filling up a 20 ft trailer by 10 ft high).

Now, you probably think $85 per is way to high but it really isn't, as I use a Stihl 130 Kombi w/an extension added to the hedger or chainsaw. Sometimes I use two extensions, this is HARD work holding the 130 up trimming limbs+ it is very very fast-too fast I think in doing the trimming.

It was hot/humid all morning long, 96 degrees! A very brutal workday. The client was extremely pleased with the work & that is all that matters to me:clapping:

I have a habit of explaining to potential clients that I use a Stihl kombi & explain the attachments it takes & how FAST it will knock out the work in using less hours to do the job. I get more jobs WHEN I EXPLAIN what kind of equipment I use. The client today was very impressed with the kombi & how fast it was & what it was able to do.

Darryl G
06-06-2011, 07:07 PM
this is what i always do...i get a figure in my head...thinking to myself i will do this yard from $40-$50...so i start off by telling them i'll do it for $50....some say ok...some say that's a little high can you do better?...so i walk around the yard a bit and i say $45?...then some accept that.....then some people are really really tight with their money and say they are gonna get other estimates or whatever...i tell them $40 is low as i can go...if they accept ok...if not then ok...i move on.

I think that's exactly the WRONG thing to do. You have validated the customers thinking that the price is negotiable and given control over to them. That's the wrong way to start a relationship with a customer.

I'm getting tired of saying this, but as a contractor we are in control of how things get done, when they get done and for what price. To let the customer dictate any of those things is a recipe for trouble down the road.

Darryl G
06-06-2011, 07:09 PM
So what you are telling me is, when you go buy a new piece of equipment, or anything for that matter, you don't ask for a better price? If you don't, I would love to see you coming, if I were the salesman. More money for me. :) I have commercial customers ask me quite often, but I still get the work. It's all about how you answer their question....... Always with another question. If your not sure how to do that, start reading some sales books. Not only are you the owner, you are the salesman, for your company.

James

Actually I don't. I ask for their best price and either take it or leave it.

snow4me
06-06-2011, 07:16 PM
The reason commercial pays better is because there are not many commercial customers doing business with illegal operations therefor the playing field is level. Most ask for proof of insurance which requires you have a registered business in the county.

Residential we are fighting an unfair battle because customers can give the work to illegal operators who have little to no overhead.

Until the gov't. starts cracking down on these illegal companies nothing will change.

tuffram
06-06-2011, 09:11 PM
The reason commercial pays better is because there are not many commercial customers doing business with illegal operations therefor the playing field is level. Most ask for proof of insurance which requires you have a registered business in the county.

Residential we are fighting an unfair battle because customers can give the work to illegal operators who have little to no overhead.

Until the gov't. starts cracking down on these illegal companies nothing will change.

That will never happen because there is nothing illegal about it. Who is going to prove you are working under the table and if they can prove this someone could also prove they donated all the money to charity. As long as itís on a cash basis its only illegal if you get caught then you start getting into high school kids that cut grass for summer money and the gov't would have to crack down on everyone that is not legitimate business that is cutting under the table and this my friends will never happen. As long as there is grass to be cut there will be people without business license, insurance, and tax id etc. nothing will ever be done to change it and that sad part is how much money lawn service generates each and every year there is a lot of unpaid tax dollars floating around these so called illegal business

topsites
06-06-2011, 09:19 PM
Really well I didn't see anyone holding a dang gun to your head if you hate it so much ain't nobody I know forcing
your will or twisting your arm saying you have to do residential or die so why don't you just stick to commercial?
Laik :dizzy: Omg :dizzy: omg :dizzy: omg :dizzy: omg :dizzy: omg :dizzy: omg :dizzy:

Patriot Services
06-06-2011, 09:22 PM
I would never drop a price by 33%. They will forever know they can haggle. Then the little "could you just" requests start. My first price is the price. The only way it goes lower is the customer gets less on their end. Guys have to learn how to quote correctly instead out the butt sideways.
Posted via Mobile Device

weeze
06-06-2011, 10:33 PM
I think that's exactly the WRONG thing to do. You have validated the customers thinking that the price is negotiable and given control over to them. That's the wrong way to start a relationship with a customer.

I'm getting tired of saying this, but as a contractor we are in control of how things get done, when they get done and for what price. To let the customer dictate any of those things is a recipe for trouble down the road.

you fail to see what i do....my price is $40...so if i get $50 it's for my benefit...i always start higher than what i want to charge that way they think i worked with them but really i just got them to agree to my price...all prices are negotiable but it's to a certain degree...i'm not gonna turn down an account over $5...who cares?....say i only get $160 a month rather than $200....i'm not gonna say no way and get $0 a month...i'll take the $160..it's not the best but it's better than nothing...you win some and you lose some...you may only get $160 from that person but another one may be paying you $240 for the same size yard so you make up for it...it all works out in the end.

weeze
06-06-2011, 10:35 PM
I would never drop a price by 33%. They will forever know they can haggle. Then the little "could you just" requests start. My first price is the price. The only way it goes lower is the customer gets less on their end. Guys have to learn how to quote correctly instead out the butt sideways.
Posted via Mobile Device

you aren't dropping the price...your original quote is 33% higher than your price.

i always try to work with people...i'm not trying to rip them off...but there is a limit to how far i will go...if they keep asking and asking for you to go lower or do this or that for free then i just drop them...you don't want those type of customers....most people agree on a price and stick to it all season and don't say another word about it.

Get Some...
06-06-2011, 10:42 PM
Six hour's of trimming is alot of hedge's.....

THEGOLDPRO
06-06-2011, 10:45 PM
I like residential. they are typically more loyal once you get to know them.

DA Quality Lawn & YS
06-06-2011, 10:57 PM
I picked up a new customer this weekend her yard was a forest!! I told her my price we agreed on the moweing of every two weeks.

I gave her a price on her very overgrown hedges. She stated that is to high maybe I will just do a few than. I said let me know which ones you want done. Now I get a phone call she stated all I can afford is 200.00 dollars could you do them all for that price? The original price was 300.00 with a 75.00 disposal fee. It is atleast a 6 hour job! I said that is my final price I can not go any lower than that.

Residential sucks!!! For the past year I have a handfull of residential and they seem to think my price is up for discusion. How do you tell these people in a nice way that is my price deal with it?

I love commercial ya give them a price either they like it or not. It seems they understand we don't do this for charity. I just show up every week give the property 110% of my time and detail and leave.

Casey word of advice for us MN LCO's - never agree to an every-other-week cut deal unless you are getting paid nicely for it. May and June esp, are no time to be cutting any MN lawn every other week. You can probably get by with it mid to late summer.

Darryl G
06-06-2011, 11:11 PM
you fail to see what i do....my price is $40...so if i get $50 it's for my benefit...i always start higher than what i want to charge that way they think i worked with them but really i just got them to agree to my price...all prices are negotiable but it's to a certain degree...i'm not gonna turn down an account over $5...who cares?....say i only get $160 a month rather than $200....i'm not gonna say no way and get $0 a month...i'll take the $160..it's not the best but it's better than nothing...you win some and you lose some...you may only get $160 from that person but another one may be paying you $240 for the same size yard so you make up for it...it all works out in the end.

No I see what you do. You give the customer the impression that they are in control of you and what you charge. Not a good idea in my book. I don't negotiate my price. You want a lower price, you get a reduced scope of work. If they say "well my budget is only $200" I'll work with them to give them $200 of work, AT MY RATES, not theirs. Hey whatever works for you.

Now for someone who is just starting out and isn't fully booked and maybe a bit unsure of pricing, it's probably better to negotiate a bit to get yourself out there working and making some money and getting some exposure. That isn't the case for me. I've been cherry picking accounts for 10 years now and don't need to chase work.

Sammy
06-07-2011, 12:04 AM
I did not get one because I was $3.00 higher than the other guy.
He asked if I would match and I told him NO !

Agreen-go
06-07-2011, 12:27 AM
New to the site here and find it very interesting with the scope of locations represented here on the board to see the same things happening where ever you go. right now I primarily service foreclosed homes and it is not very profitable, I also am building up my residential clientele. I've been a LCO for over 5 years.
I believe if you give someone a quote you should stick by it, some may say oh it's only $5 or $10 but add it up.If you're doing a once a month service quote at $100 and they want you to drop it to $90 that's $120 bucks over a year now multiply that by every customer you agree to do that.
Every time you drop your price you're agreeing with the customer that you priced it too high to begin with.
Some times you can look at a bid and renegotiate but if you're confident in your bidding process you shouldn't have to.
If you think about it when a customer would rather go with the local home hardware store day laborers or the ones standing at the local nursery then let them,the ones out here in Vegas charge more then most people think. My neighbor thought he was getting a deal for a yard clean up till I told him I would have been $20 cheaper and that was $50/hr rate doing the job by myself (he hired 2 guys).
p.s. thanks to all the great posts on this site it's very informative.

Agreen-go :usflag:

kludgemonkey
06-07-2011, 01:20 AM
this is what i always do...i get a figure in my head...thinking to myself i will do this yard from $40-$50...so i start off by telling them i'll do it for $50....some say ok...some say that's a little high can you do better?...so i walk around the yard a bit and i say $45?...then some accept that.....then some people are really really tight with their money and say they are gonna get other estimates or whatever...i tell them $40 is low as i can go...if they accept ok...if not then ok...i move on.

I call this the gasp factor. I look at the yard, figure it's a $35.00 job. So I say to the customer, "Customer, I am thinking around $60.00 because of this and that". (They gasp, be sure to wait for the gasp)

Then you go on and on about all the stuff you can do for them and how they need their hedges trimmed, their flower beds re-edged and re-done, and on a good fert program, about how this tree drops so many leaves in the fall, what a good job you do, and that, on and on.

Then you tell them, "Since your such a nice lady/man, I would be willing todo this all for you for only $45.00 per a visit (or what ever price is fair for the year of work you are going to put into this place that is lower per a visit than your original price)." This builds value into what you are selling for $60.00 a visit, and wait, they are getting all this for only $45.00 a visit....wow, what I deal, I want in.

Pull out your yearly contract and have them pre-pay the 140.00 for the first month. Explain how by pre-paying each month it allows you to keep cost down by not having to deal with slow and late pays and by keeping your operating cost down you able to pass the savings on to them. And there you ago, another 1440.00 ducks a year in your pocket.

Important!!!!! Don't use these fictional numbers. Know your cost and what you can do the yard for before you talk with them. Sell value and you will always come out a head. ;-) And don't downplay the gasp factor, it works.

Now, I didn't give all my secrets away, so work on it and build your own gasp factor.

McVey Landscape
06-07-2011, 02:39 AM
I tell them the price. Sometimes they want a lower bid. I explain we are a top notch company. The bushes or whatever will look its best when we are through. I explain to them they can call one of my local competitors and give them their numbers. I also tell them and show them work we have fixed from my local fly by night, cut throat competitors. They usually will sign with us. Some have called and regretted the results.

weeze
06-07-2011, 10:17 PM
this is what i've learned...price it high at first...EVERYONE wants a deal...very few ever say ok to your first number you throw out...some do but most don't...sometimes i've had customers tell me they will pay me an amount and it was higher than what i was gonna say...so sometimes it's best to not even throw out a number right away lol...you gotta take it one yard at a time...every yard is different and every customer is different...i come up with a $10 window....a price range i'm willing to do the yard at....if we can agree on a price within that range then i will do it...if not then i don't....there's really no exact science to pricing....you just have to feel it out and decide for yourself what you wanna do...you can say $40 take it or leave it or you can work with people a bit...but if $40 is the minimum you wanna go then don't start out bidding $40 cuz you may not get it....say $45 or $50....then you may end up with more or you may end up with $40 which is what you wanted in the first place...it just betters your odds on getting the job...it's kindof reverse psychology or something lol....but if you walk up and say $40 they may say "can you do it for $35?" and then if you can't you have to walk away....it's weird i know but people seem to want a series of steps or negotiation in the price....some don't but most do....as long as you come down a bit they usually say ok and think they are getting a deal...but if you just say this is my price take it or leave it they usually say no thanks and they call someone else.

Darryl G
06-07-2011, 10:39 PM
Price games and manipulation.

Jason: How do you think your customers would feel if they read your recent posts here about how you try to manipulate them into thinking you're giving them a deal?

Personally I go the honesty/integrity route.

steel05
06-07-2011, 11:20 PM
This is what I tell them.... When you go to a restaurant and order a 20.00 steak, then ask to pay 10.00 dollars for it. Does the restaurant go for that ??? Hell no they don't! They figure it out. And they might feel a little dumb. The price is the price.
I'm not like this with all my clients, Those who pay monthly and are understanding I'll negotiate with, but those who want to haggle over a few dollars, they get the steak talk.

Gianninilandscaping
06-08-2011, 06:01 AM
I base my pricing off of an average yard here in the north west burbs of chicago as $20 little larger yards are $25 and double size lots are $35 if they want it bagged its an extra $5 and if they want me to haul it away its and extra $5, and i tell them that is my price. I let them know i dont charge double for a double lot because i dont have to spend $5 bucks in gas to go to the next lot. its i believe $7 to dump a can of grass and it takes extra time to bag the lawn. If they want money off i tell them that its my bottom price but if they want to get money back i have a refer a friend program and i give them $5 for every weekly or bi weekly account they refer to me. in the long run i spend $5 to make another 20-50 bucks, it pays off perfectly...

topsites
06-08-2011, 06:08 AM
I call this the gasp factor. I look at the yard, figure it's a $35.00 job. So I say to the customer, "Customer, I am thinking around $60.00 because of this and that". (They gasp, be sure to wait for the gasp)

Then you go on and on about all the stuff you can do for them and how they need their hedges trimmed, their flower beds re-edged and re-done, and on a good fert program, about how this tree drops so many leaves in the fall, what a good job you do, and that, on and on.

Then you tell them, "Since your such a nice lady/man, I would be willing todo this all for you for only $45.00 per a visit (or what ever price is fair for the year of work you are going to put into this place that is lower per a visit than your original price)." This builds value into what you are selling for $60.00 a visit, and wait, they are getting all this for only $45.00 a visit....wow, what I deal, I want in.

Whoa, you pull that on me and I catch on it's over before we even start,
I'll deal with your kind only for as long as I absolutely have to, then never again.
Well, we're done, time for you to get walking. :waving:

Price games and manipulation.

Jason: How do you think your customers would feel if they read your recent posts here about how you try to manipulate them into thinking you're giving them a deal?

Personally I go the honesty/integrity route.

Yes sir, that's what I'm talking about.

DuallyVette
06-08-2011, 07:24 PM
In marketing products, like ice cream. Breyers has made the 1/2 gallon into a 3/4 of a half gallon , over time. At one point the container was $5, and it goes on sale regularly for 1/2 price. Large companies know that the general population is stupid and doesn't know the difference...or...they understand the game, and accept the increase in price...and only buy ice cream every 3rd week when it's "on sale". "Marketing" is manipulation...or lying.

When I deal with a contractor (auto/ or mower mechanic, HVAC,roofer etc.), I want to feel like I can trust his abilities, judgment, and pricing strategy. If you quote me $50 to mow my lawn, and I get you to agree to $40....I don't think you know what your doing and my respect for you is low. I also expect you to high ball me when I want my shrubbery trimmed and my leaves removed in the Fall. I know my mower mechanic will treat me fairly. He's making money from me, but I know it's fair. I don't have to get pricing before the repair, I don't have to negotiate with him. My year round maintenance customers rarely ask for a price before we do an extra job. They feel my pricing is fair, and they expect the same on the extra jobs.

grass catcher
06-08-2011, 09:49 PM
we pay to many taxes already sales tax gas tax payroll tax
sos tax unemp tax I am consid caash only do not miss understand me
I do not mind to pay my fair share but our gov wastes trillions of dollars on crap other countries whores or what ever
I am tired of paying for crap
we need to take our country back and send these pol and obama to
any place but here

Agreen-go
06-08-2011, 09:54 PM
Here's another thought to giving different prices for the same work to different people.
What if those people know each other without you being aware of it?
I can hear it now. " Hey my friend down the street uses you too and we get the exact same services, how come you charge them $25 dollars less than me?"
At which point you say,, "ummm, well I , um "
To which both customers will tell you to go take a hike.
Agreen-go:usflag:

topsites
06-08-2011, 10:22 PM
I did not get one because I was $3.00 higher than the other guy.
He asked if I would match and I told him NO !

Do you know that a good percent of the time, there is no other guy?
In other cases, the other guy is someone like me who said I'd do it for $3 less but then they got funny on me and said they
"had to think about it" and they would call me... Now in my book that means no, and they know as well as I do that they don't
REALLY want to have to call me back because there's a chance the price done went up.

You see, I'm a professional lowballer lol when I give a good price, I EXPECT a "Yes, do it" in return!
It's called haggling, you want a good price, fine, I want a Yes answer and when I don't get that, I don't give a F WHO they call.

Just something to think about, the next time someone wants to bluff about the other guy.
And they might still say no, that's a very real possibility, but did you want that account?
You didn't bend, they lost interest.

Now I don't suppose I want to go so far as to say whose loss that is because that depends on a lot of things,
but a lot of these things you have to decide beforehand, do you want that account?

Peace out

weeze
06-08-2011, 11:23 PM
Price games and manipulation.

Jason: How do you think your customers would feel if they read your recent posts here about how you try to manipulate them into thinking you're giving them a deal?

Personally I go the honesty/integrity route.

actually no...i am totally honest...i just don't let people rip me off...it can work both ways..customers rip honest hard working people off every day...you can take anything and run with it....take it way out of context...i'm not trying to make them think i'm giving them a deal...it's more i'm protecting myself from getting talked down too low and ripping myself off in the process.

there are two types of people...hagglers and non hagglers....me personally i'm a non haggler...i'd rather pay a little more than spend an hour wasting my time haggling with an auto salesman....i'd pay more money just to get them to shut up....that's just me though...alot of people aren't like me....to be honest i'd be ok if i didn't have any hagglers as customers....but like i said every customer is different.

Darryl G
06-08-2011, 11:46 PM
you fail to see what i do....my price is $40...so if i get $50 it's for my benefit...i always start higher than what i want to charge that way they think i worked with them but really i just got them to agree to my price....

actually no...i am totally honest...i just don't let people rip me off...it can work both ways..customers rip honest hard working people off every day...you can take anything and run with it....take it way out of context...i'm not trying to make them think i'm giving them a deal...it's more i'm protecting myself from getting talked down too low and ripping myself off in the process.


Sorry if I misunderstood. I think the problem is that you're speaking out of both sides of your mouth and contradicting yourself.

Just give them a damn price and either they hire you or they don't. It's a bid. You place your bid and they decide if they want you for that price. It's a service not a commodity, so the low bid doesn't necessarily get the job. I actually got a spring cleanup even though I was the high bidder because I was the only one who was able to give the customer a detailed walk-through of how I would do the job, with what equipment and what day. It's not always about money. I think you need to spend more effort selling the customer on you and less on price games.

weeze
06-09-2011, 10:15 PM
it's not contradiction...it's business....i try to get as much money as i can...some it may be $50 others it may be $40....but my goal is to make as much as i can so i shoot to make $50...$50 isn't ripping someone off....if you charge $75 for a $40 yard then yes that is ripping someone off....when i said the first one i was commenting about the haggler customers....not all customers are like that...some i give a price and they take it...nice and easy but not all of them are that way unfortunately...i'm not contradicting myself..you just can't see the big picture...i don't try to be the lowest bid...i try to meet the customer on their level to some degree.....some can afford $50 and some can only afford $40....and some pretend they can't afford $50 but they could afford $60....like i said i have a $10 window...if the price is within that range i'll do it...if not then they can get someone else...i can't narrow it down to one number no matter what yard it is....there are too many variables to factor in...$5-$10 here of there isn't a big deal to me...i could care less...i'm not gonna turn down a job because they wouldn't pay me $5 more...whoop-te-doo but i'm not gonna go around giving everybody $5 discounts either.

Darryl G
06-09-2011, 11:10 PM
I see the big picture just fine. I've been bidding jobs and dealing with customers for 25 years now (10 years in this business). Everything from $25 to $500,000. I'm a straight shooter and people appreciate that. I can and do narrow my price down to a single number just fine regarless of what yard it is.

Best wishes. I've said all I have to say on this topic.

justanotherlawnguy
06-10-2011, 02:10 AM
Residential sucks because you cannot price it right. $300 for a 6 hour hedge trimming job and $75 to dump it....

I've done many $300 hedge trimming jobs and managed to stuff all the trimmings in the back of a 6 foot bed with sides. 2 maybe 3 hours max to trim that many hedges.

Stick with commercial where the money is guaranteed, but the margins are smaller!!!! I will take residential all day long.
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Patriot Services
06-10-2011, 05:25 PM
See why you guys gotta stayed hydrated in this heat. By now he is probably driving his ZTR down main street naked. MEDIC!!!!:usflag:

topsites
06-10-2011, 09:43 PM
Residential sucks because you cannot price it right. $300 for a 6 hour hedge trimming job and $75 to dump it....

I've done many $300 hedge trimming jobs and managed to stuff all the trimmings in the back of a 6 foot bed with sides. 2 maybe 3 hours max to trim that many hedges.

Stick with commercial where the money is guaranteed, but the margins are smaller!!!! I will take residential all day long.
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Ok, so the purpose of this thread is to badmouth residentials so that the reader will think going to commercial is better,
then as soon as they go that route you can go behind them and hit up the residentials they just left open, is that right?

But wait...
You don't think 2, maybe 3 hours tops is a bit stiff for $300?

I think you're out of your mind you should have jumped on it at $200 she was being generous.