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View Full Version : How much coffee grounds in a compost pile??


CorkscrewWillow
06-06-2011, 02:17 PM
My wife is a coffee drinker, 1/2 pot per day.
I've been putting the coffee grounds in our home compost pile.
How much is to much?? Adverse affects?? Benefits??
She goes through about 1# per month of ground coffee.

Thoughts??

phasthound
06-06-2011, 06:27 PM
My wife is a coffee drinker, 1/2 pot per day.
I've been putting the coffee grounds in our home compost pile.
How much is to much?? Adverse affects?? Benefits??
She goes through about 1# per month of ground coffee.

Thoughts??

How big is your compost pile? What else are you adding to it?
You might want to get this book. The Rodale Book of Composting: Easy Methods for Every Gardener.

NattyLawn
06-06-2011, 11:14 PM
1lb per month isn't much at all.

No adverse effects, and the benefits are worms love them.

Smallaxe
06-07-2011, 09:11 AM
Put the coffee grounds right on the turf... :)

CorkscrewWillow
06-07-2011, 06:26 PM
Thanx guys
I was a tad worried about the pH lowering with the addition of coffee grounds but 1# per month in a 500# compost pile is not much now that I think about it.

phasthound
06-07-2011, 09:58 PM
Thanx guys
I was a tad worried about the pH lowering with the addition of coffee grounds but 1# per month in a 500# compost pile is not much now that I think about it.

Yea, you're good to go.

Smallaxe
06-08-2011, 09:52 AM
Isn't it true that any material that may be acidic when alive, will compost down close to 'neutral'?

Pine needles and Oak leaves etc., that their acids will also break down into neutral components. Is that true?

JDUtah
06-08-2011, 01:50 PM
As far as I understand the ions wont break down so much as be utilized into more stable forms

Smallaxe
06-08-2011, 10:16 PM
As far as I understand the ions wont break down so much as be utilized into more stable forms

Well, coffee grounds are considered to lose there acidic qualities in the brewing itself... Therefore the UCG had already lost their acidic qualities...

Do you know of a discussion of this phenomena, which may shed some light on this situation?

Stillwater
06-09-2011, 10:35 AM
Well, coffee grounds are considered to lose there acidic qualities in the brewing itself... Therefore the UCG had already lost their acidic qualities...

Do you know of a discussion of this phenomena, which may shed some light on this situation?

http://www.green-talk.com/2007/10/10/coffee-grounds-garden-friend-or-foe/

Smallaxe
06-09-2011, 11:33 AM
http://www.green-talk.com/2007/10/10/coffee-grounds-garden-friend-or-foe/

The answer is... nobody knows...

Stillwater
06-09-2011, 12:32 PM
Then you missed the enternal links to Will Brintons discussion on his research on this.

Smallaxe
06-10-2011, 10:41 AM
Then you missed the enternal links to Will Brintons discussion on his research on this.

Yeah, I must have... What I got out of it was different sources saying completely opposite things... There was a plethora of internal sources and who knows if it is all speculation or not...

Is the Will Brinton discussion, definitive and scientific, with testing done throughout a decomposition process???

It really wouldn't take much more than a pile of coffee grounds and litmus paper to measure what happens over time... but try and find litmus paper anymore...

Stillwater
06-10-2011, 11:04 AM
Yeah, I must have... What I got out of it was different sources saying completely opposite things... There was a plethora of internal sources and who knows if it is all speculation or not...

Is the Will Brinton discussion, definitive and scientific, with testing done throughout a decomposition process???

It really wouldn't take much more than a pile of coffee grounds and litmus paper to measure what happens over time... but try and find litmus paper anymore...


Aparently he owns a lab called woods end research lab in Maine, I did not read the whole artical, I am not as knowledgeable in this area as some of you guys are so I don't have alot of input to add above what i have read.

Smallaxe
06-12-2011, 11:06 AM
The thing is, Brinton says just the opposite of what the Rodale Institute says... They can't both be right and how can we know if either is correct?
My guess that Rodale's evaluation is correct... Definitive research is what is needed...

So far I've personally had no problem with coffee grounds, even when the decompose in a pile b4 I work them into the soil and plant in that soil...

Exact Rototilling
07-05-2011, 10:53 PM
It's a bit off topic but I was thinking of using coffee grounds for fairy ring top dressing.......?
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