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View Full Version : retaining wall ?'s....


SusanL
06-06-2011, 03:45 PM
I have two retaining walls, one on either side of the driveway. They both need to be rebuilt, and one of them needs to be moved further back to widen the drive.

I rebuilt parts of them last year, but after the winter snow melted I found that they had pushed back out. What are some things I can do so I do not have to worry about this happening next time?

I want to plan and do it correctly; so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

SusanL
06-06-2011, 04:25 PM
Sorry guys and galls I forgot to add pics.

This is what I am working with...
223032
223033
223034

4 seasons lawn&land
06-06-2011, 08:30 PM
you need to take them down and dig the soil out a foot under the wall and a couple feet behind the wall, pack the base with aggregate stone, rebuild the wall three-four times as wide, stack 2 over 1, backfill and compact the backside also with aggregate stone

Dr.NewEarth
06-06-2011, 11:47 PM
You could try adding a drain tile too, behind the first course.

4Russl5
06-07-2011, 10:18 AM
Length of your stone goes into the wall also. And a thicker cap course.

Cam.at.Heritage
06-07-2011, 03:57 PM
I agree with everything said so far, it also looks like the base of the first wall is actually resting on the driveway move it back so its completely on its own new base material.

You could also mortar the stones together, this is obviously a lot more work but if you put the mortar deep into the wall you can make it appear like its still a dry stack wall, but with the strength of a mortared wall.

White Gardens
06-07-2011, 11:38 PM
So did anyone notice that the first course is sitting on the driveway?

I'd mortar those suckers. I'd put the first course in type S-mortar with a couple of pieces of 1/2 rebar. I love dried laid walls, but the grade in this situation isn't conducive for one.

I'd even stick some geo-grid in one of the course as you went. Then also back-fill correctly and do drainage.

4 seasons lawn&land
06-08-2011, 09:03 PM
I wouldnt mortar a wall with out a full 3 ft frost wall or its going to break up, no?

land_scaper70
06-09-2011, 03:23 PM
Personally, I feel you should call someone, a professional, in to do the job right. The bitterness of a poor job out lasts the taste of sweet savings.

White Gardens
06-09-2011, 11:43 PM
I wouldnt mortar a wall with out a full 3 ft frost wall or its going to break up, no?

Na...

Think of it this way, if you mortar up a brick building, would you put a frost wall on the outside to protect it?

Moneypit
06-10-2011, 12:08 AM
Na...

Think of it this way, if you mortar up a brick building, would you put a frost wall on the outside to protect it?


By "frost wall" I am assuming he is stating to start the footing of the mortared wall below the frost line.
Not to build an actual wall in front of the mortared wall to protect it from frost :laugh::laugh:

White Gardens
06-10-2011, 02:13 AM
By "frost wall" I am assuming he is stating to start the footing of the mortared wall below the frost line.
Not to build an actual wall in front of the mortared wall to protect it from frost :laugh::laugh:

Oooops, My bad....:hammerhead:

I can understand that theory.

I've done a few natural stone walls in the last 5 years that were brick and mortared. I even do the dry laid appearance with a minimal amount of mortar in between each course and only on the back 2/3rds of the block.

I haven't yet had any of those walls shift or move on me. Might be the re-bar and fiber re-enforcement I use in the footer for the first course.

jonesy5149
06-11-2011, 05:39 PM
Oooops, My bad....:hammerhead:

I can understand that theory.

I've done a few natural stone walls in the last 5 years that were brick and mortared. I even do the dry laid appearance with a minimal amount of mortar in between each course and only on the back 2/3rds of the block.

I haven't yet had any of those walls shift or move on me. Might be the re-bar and fiber re-enforcement I use in the footer for the first course.

ohhhhhhh boy im calling that out as a lie................. sry white Gardens.
your tell me that if that was your wall and you wanted the look of dry stack you would poor a footer for a wall that is only 3' tall............. if any thing i would (im just saying ) lay it dry stack but use foldable fill as footer and no rebar so if it dose move it will not be to rigid. and if you do a wall out of brick and mortar is that call natural stone?!!! i may be just a little lost on that..:confused::confused:

4 seasons lawn&land
06-11-2011, 07:13 PM
By "frost wall" I am assuming he is stating to start the footing of the mortared wall below the frost line.
Not to build an actual wall in front of the mortared wall to protect it from frost :laugh::laugh:


Yeah that^^.

Maybe IL has a bit more mild climate. Here the mortar walls and pillars that arent 3 foot under are probably going to lean. It might take a long time