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View Full Version : Shrub Trimming Job (before and after Pictures)


ArenaLandscaping
07-28-2011, 01:59 PM
Here are some before and after pictures of a 3 week shrub trimming job that I am on.

I have been trimming the trees and shrubs on this property for the last 10 years. It took a long time to get this property to look like this.

The previous landscaping company had neglected anything that had to do with the beds, they concentrated more on the lawn.

The first initial pruning took me over 2 months to complete. I have never personally seen so much dead wood and bad pruning cuts .

Any comments or opinions would be appreciated.

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1764.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1808-1.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1833.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1823.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1848.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1762.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1781.jpg

v_mac_09
07-28-2011, 02:25 PM
Looks Great! Very nice work...

Mark Oomkes
07-28-2011, 03:00 PM
OK, I'm going to catch it for this, but why did you ruin those Jap maples?

I know some gardens require formal trimming but not Jap maples. Fine and dandy keeping the hedges tight, but Jap maples turned into umbrellas?

Sorry, those look terrible IMO.

PerfectEarth
07-28-2011, 03:20 PM
OK, I'm going to catch it for this, but why did you ruin those Jap maples?

I know some gardens require formal trimming but not Jap maples. Fine and dandy keeping the hedges tight, but Jap maples turned into umbrellas?

Sorry, those look terrible IMO.

Agreed 1000%

You've done a great job on the shrubs....the 3 large burning bush (?- can't tell exactly) look fantastic! But the Maples....oh my.

DIXIECONTRACTING
07-28-2011, 03:43 PM
OK, I'm going to catch it for this, but why did you ruin those Jap maples?

I know some gardens require formal trimming but not Jap maples. Fine and dandy keeping the hedges tight, but Jap maples turned into umbrellas?

Sorry, those look terrible IMO.

I also agree only if the customer requested them to be trimmed that way and even then I would strongly advise them against it. Jap Maples should be very lightly pruned just to keep them neat but never tight like that. My 2 cents but everything else looks great!

GreenI.A.
07-28-2011, 04:52 PM
The shrubs look great, they look like they have been regularly maintained and not the mess you started with. But I have to agree with everyone else on the jap maples. I would never ever take a hedge trimmer to them, only a pair of hand pruners. Even if the customer requested it and I couldn't talk them out of doing it, I would still just do the rest and prune the maples and let them see them pruned before I ever hacked them up. I would be conceared about stressing it out way to much, something that jap maples are suseptable to

Glenn Lawn Care
07-28-2011, 04:55 PM
Those look very nice!! Is that with a hand shears or power?

ArenaLandscaping
07-28-2011, 05:14 PM
The shrubs look great, they look like they have been regularly maintained and not the mess you started with. But I have to agree with everyone else on the jap maples. I would never ever take a hedge trimmer to them, only a pair of hand pruners. Even if the customer requested it and I couldn't talk them out of doing it, I would still just do the rest and prune the maples and let them see them pruned before I ever hacked them up. I would be conceared about stressing it out way to much, something that jap maples are suseptable to

I would not say "hacked them up" I take offense to that! It takes skill to trim a jap maple like that, 10 years of pruning. Most people cant trim like that. I was unaware there was a rule book for trimming jap maples or trimming in general. Doing what I do to shrubs and trees has made me very successful , with many happy customers.The tree has never been stressed not once in 10 years. The customer did not request me to trim it that way . I felt that they would have to be trimmed that way to fit into the landscape. Here is a picture of the tree. I may be seeing things, but I see a very healthy tree.

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1808-1.jpg

Mark Oomkes
07-28-2011, 05:22 PM
I would not say "hacked them up" I take offense to that! It takes skill to trim a jap maple like that, 10 years of pruning. Most people cant trim like that. I was unaware there was a rule book for trimming jap maples or trimming in general. Doing what I do to shrubs and trees has made me very successful , with many happy customers.The tree has never been stressed not once in 10 years. The customer did not request me to trim it that way . I felt that they would have to be trimmed that way to fit into the landscape. Here is a picture of the tree. I may be seeing things, but I see a very healthy tree.

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1808-1.jpg

FWIW, I asked my 12 YO daughter what she thought. She said they were ugly because they look like mushrooms, not trees. She thought the shrubs looked great though.

For me, it's just a thing I have for allowing things to grow as God intended. I can appreciate a nice hedge, but IMO trees should not be trimmed like this.

Take a pic this fall when the leaves are off and then we can see if you did a professional job of trimming or not.

JDiepstra
07-28-2011, 07:04 PM
Im confused... God wants bushes trimmed up neat but not decorative trees? I guess Mr Miagi is going to hell for what he did to those bonsai trees!
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JDiepstra
07-28-2011, 07:05 PM
Also, nice trim job.
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bobcat48
07-28-2011, 07:06 PM
Looks great,nice job!

StihlMechanic
07-28-2011, 07:14 PM
I am a fan of little or no pruning to an Acer Palmatum but this is a common method for laceleafs and goes well with the lines of the other shrubs. Well done IMO. It would of looked odd had they NOT been pruned in this fashion considering they have probably been trained this way for years. Nice work!

cborden
07-28-2011, 07:45 PM
I like the tightly trimmed Jap Maples.

Az Gardener
07-28-2011, 07:55 PM
I would not say "hacked them up" I take offense to that! It takes skill to trim a jap maple like that, 10 years of pruning. Most people cant trim like that. I was unaware there was a rule book for trimming jap maples or trimming in general. Doing what I do to shrubs and trees has made me very successful , with many happy customers.The tree has never been stressed not once in 10 years. The customer did not request me to trim it that way . I felt that they would have to be trimmed that way to fit into the landscape. Here is a picture of the tree. I may be seeing things, but I see a very healthy tree.


In fact there is a rule book for trimming, for trees ISA International Society of Arborculture has a lot to say. The American National Standards Institute is referred to as the ANSI 3000 standards is what all professional tree trimmers adhere to.

Here in Az there are rules for trimming shrubs and there probably are in your state too. Do yourself and the industry a favor and educate yourself. Just because you have been doing it this way or that for 10 years and nothing has died does not make it right. I would say these trees have survived in spite of you not because of your trimming.

GreenI.A.
07-28-2011, 08:22 PM
I would not say "hacked them up" I take offense to that! It takes skill to trim a jap maple like that, 10 years of pruning. Most people cant trim like that. I was unaware there was a rule book for trimming jap maples or trimming in general. Doing what I do to shrubs and trees has made me very successful , with many happy customers.The tree has never been stressed not once in 10 years. The customer did not request me to trim it that way . I felt that they would have to be trimmed that way to fit into the landscape. Here is a picture of the tree. I may be seeing things, but I see a very healthy tree.


I will start once again with complimenting your skills with the trimmer, even the skills you displayed on the maples. But my point on the maples is that they are a tree, not a shrub. They may be smaller and compact such as a shrub but their growing form is a TREE. A TREE such as a Japenese Maple should be delicately pruned. All cuts should be made at a lateral branch, bud, main stem, etc... Also, I am not sure how aware you are of the propper time to prune japanese maples, but the ISA, Mass Arborist Association, and many publications recomend pruning Japanese Maples only in the fall just before dormancy to early spring at bud break. Is not recomended to prune them mid season due to stress from the heat. You chose the hottest time of the year to prune these specimen TREES.

I'm not trying to get on you about the work you do, it looks abesolutely great. But unfortunetly trees, especially delicate trees, need to be treated different than shrubs/bushes. I am sure if I looked at the tree, I would see hundreds of bad cuts, that are suseptable to fungas, disease, insects.

Also, mid season pruning of maples, highly encourages early leaf drop of all of the leaves. So by doing an extream pruning in July/August your customer will have less time to enjoy the tree with its leaves

THEGOLDPRO
07-28-2011, 09:08 PM
you destroyed the Japenese maples

Turf Commando
07-28-2011, 09:14 PM
First, I'll say you have mad trimming skills ...
The tree isn't the best idea to make it umbrella, but I must say your one hell of a pruner/trimmer...

ArenaLandscaping
07-29-2011, 05:33 AM
In fact there is a rule book for trimming, for trees ISA International Society of Arborculture has a lot to say. The American National Standards Institute is referred to as the ANSI 3000 standards is what all professional tree trimmers adhere to.

Here in Az there are rules for trimming shrubs and there probably are in your state too. Do yourself and the industry a favor and educate yourself. Just because you have been doing it this way or that for 10 years and nothing has died does not make it right. I would say these trees have survived in spite of you not because of your trimming.

I am glad that you think I am uneducated. There is no rule book for what a shrub, tree , bush, or any ornamental should or should not look like. I have trained these trees to look this way with a gas powered hedge trimmer. I go through the tree with hand snips and clean up the whole tree. Spite has nothing to do with it. They have survived because they like to be trimmed that way.

ny scaper
07-29-2011, 09:17 AM
You do some excellent work! I wish I had that skill. Makes me feel like a hack and I think I do pretty good work. What hedge trimmer you using? Never seen a JM trimmed up that way and as long as its healthy, then I see no problem with it. Its definitely different than what I see and i like it. Its all in the eye of the beholder

WPS85
07-29-2011, 09:39 AM
I would not say "hacked them up" I take offense to that! It takes skill to trim a jap maple like that, 10 years of pruning. Most people cant trim like that. I was unaware there was a rule book for trimming jap maples or trimming in general. Doing what I do to shrubs and trees has made me very successful , with many happy customers.The tree has never been stressed not once in 10 years. The customer did not request me to trim it that way . I felt that they would have to be trimmed that way to fit into the landscape.

The Jap Maples looks great that way!, and yes, they fit into the landscape better trimmed that way! That is a work of art that you did! As long as the homeowner is happy with the way they look now, then that's all that matters!

Don't pay any attention to what they say on here. Maybe some are jealous they can't trim that way.

I have seen Jap Maples trimmed that way in this area. Those trees can take a lot of trimming and it doesn't hurt them at all. Those trees are NOT destroyed like one member said.

Keep up the good work!

In fact there is a rule book for trimming, for trees ISA International Society of Arborculture has a lot to say. The American National Standards Institute is referred to as the ANSI 3000 standards is what all professional tree trimmers adhere to.

Here in Az there are rules for trimming shrubs and there probably are in your state too. Do yourself and the industry a favor and educate yourself. Just because you have been doing it this way or that for 10 years and nothing has died does not make it right. I would say these trees have survived in spite of you not because of your trimming.
LMAO. :laugh: A rule book for trimming.LOL.:dizzy: Never heard of that before. I guess I'm in trouble for trimming trees the wrong way too.:rolleyes:

There are not any rules for trimming shrubs in this area. LOL

You need to quit bashing him by saying that he needs to educate himself. That's the problem with this site, Too many people like to bash other members. IT NEEDS TO STOP!

orlawncaresvc
07-29-2011, 10:28 AM
They actually look great. I think. Did the customer request them to be trimmed that way? Where we are located a lot of customers actually like having their jap mapes trimmed and formed to look like bushes and also the traditional way. Like a tree.
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StihlMechanic
07-29-2011, 10:43 AM
So? What hedge trimmer did you use?

lawnman24949
07-29-2011, 12:14 PM
The Burning Bushes look great and i think the Japanese maples look good in that landscaping but would probably not trim them that way. Do you have any pictures of the whole property to see how you spent 2 months on that property.

JDiepstra
07-29-2011, 12:22 PM
The Burning Bushes look great and i think the Japanese maples look good in that landscaping but would probably not trim them that way. Do you have any pictures of the whole property to see how you spent 2 months on that property.

Hahahah i was wondering the same thing!

mag360
07-29-2011, 03:50 PM
Nice work! If you really took the time to clean up your cuts on the trees that's great. The problem with shearing them is that the stub of any trimmed branch will die out back to the first lateral coming off of it and will become susceptible to infection and weaken the tree in general. Taking that cut back to the first lateral allows for proper recovery from the cut and no dead wood left on the tree. Technically even the shrubs would benefit from this but it is not common practice due to cost and time constraints.

ArenaLandscaping
07-29-2011, 05:30 PM
The Burning Bushes look great and i think the Japanese maples look good in that landscaping but would probably not trim them that way. Do you have any pictures of the whole property to see how you spent 2 months on that property.

I will upload more pics of the property to my computer. Then post them on the forum. It took 2 months to fix all the mistakes from the previous landscape company. The property is 6 acres situated on the ocean. The rhodys on the property alone took 1 week to trim and repair (bad cuts,dead wood,crossed overlapping branches, etc.....) That it is 8 to 10 hours a day of trimming . Like I said the trees , shrubs and beds were neglected for 3 or 4 years.

ArenaLandscaping
07-29-2011, 05:41 PM
So? What hedge trimmer did you use?

On the the jap maples I used a Redmax SRTZ2401 Hedge Trimmer (articulated) NOT CHEAP!!! and Felco #2 Hand Pruners. I also used a Little Wonder single sided gas trimmer and a small Shindaiwa double sided hedge trimmer on the property also.

nepatsfan
07-29-2011, 06:24 PM
Have the homeowners seen it yet?

Firefighter337
07-29-2011, 06:51 PM
Awesome work on all of it. I have seen jap maples trimmed with hedge trimmers, but they were not that tight. Impressive talent.

Surf'n'Turf
07-30-2011, 12:46 AM
on behalf of the chipmunks, voles, field mice and other rodents; we extend our thanks during these extreme hot days for proving us with this finely manicured beach umbrella to help keep us cool. cheers!

ArenaLandscaping
07-30-2011, 03:28 PM
Here is another couple of pictures of the "ruined specimen jap maple trees" before trimming in the first week of June.

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1760-1.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1808-1.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1805.jpg

THEGOLDPRO
07-30-2011, 03:46 PM
Poor trees. RIP poor little maples.

chesterlawn
07-31-2011, 11:25 AM
This is unreal, he did no damage at all to those maples. They look different yes, so do espaliered trees. Tell me what damage did he do? If left alone for a couple of years they will look as they did. You did a great job, keep it up. Lets see some of the great work you all do. Oh no it's not in the BOOK, you cant do it then.:laugh:

Az Gardener
07-31-2011, 11:48 AM
Here's some advice so you can be a professional someday?

Acting like a professional really means doing what it takes to make others think of you as reliable, respectful, and competent. Depending on where you work and the type of job you have, this can take on many different forms.

There are, however, quite a few common traits when it comes to being professional. This includes the following:

1. Competence. Youíre good at what you do Ė and you have the skills and knowledge that enable you to do your job well. You highlighted skills but IMHO the knowledge should be highlighted you need the knowledge to use your skills properly. Take that picture to any one with a ISA certification or horticulture degree and they will tell you that is a very poor example of tree care

2. Reliability. People can depend on you to show up on time, submit your work when itís supposed to be ready, etc.

3. Honesty. You tell the truth and are upfront about where things stand.

4. Integrity. You are known for your consistent principles.

5. Respect For Others. Treating all people as if they mattered is part of your approach. How about because they matter you probably just mispoke but that stood out to me

6. Self-Upgrading. Rather than letting your skills or knowledge become outdated, you seek out ways of staying current. I strongly agree your Knowledge needs to be consistently upgraded but if you are growing your business you will loose you field skills and that's not a bad thing, more like a badge of honor. You do need to be sharpening other skills like management, human resources, accounting, forecasting.

7. Being Positive. No one likes a constant pessimist. Having an upbeat attitude and trying to be a problem-solver makes a big difference.

8. Listening Carefully. People want to be heard, so you give people a chance to explain their ideas properly.

You spoke a couple of times about knowledge but it appears yours is limited in the field of Arborculture. This is not a slam or any disrespect to you just pointing out a fact. I have been on this forum for years learning and sharing my knowledge. It is just irresponsible to let that job pass as horticulturally correct.

The client may like it now but in 5 years or so when those trees begin to decline and they call a real professional out to diagnose the problem they wont have to look too hard to figure it out.

You know athletes on steroids look great for a while but in the long run that which made them so good causes their early demise.

Clients look to us for guidance, to know our craft. They may have ideas of how they like things to look but I have rarely had a client say "I don't care if it shortens the lifespan of the tree by 50% or more prune it like that."

Lastly if that's the look the client likes it can be achieved by making selective pruning cuts it won't be quite as tight but the look can be kept consistent and the trees will remain healthy. It will take longer but if they own 6 acres on the ocean cost should not be a concern. So its a win win you make more money and the trees get a better chance at survival.

That is if you are a professional and have the knowledge and skills to prune the tree properly...

ArenaLandscaping
07-31-2011, 12:04 PM
You spoke a couple of times about knowledge but it appears yours is limited in the field of Arborculture. This is not a slam or any disrespect to you just pointing out a fact. I have been on this forum for years learning and sharing my knowledge. It is just irresponsible to let that job pass as horticulturally correct.

The client may like it now but in 5 years or so when those trees begin to decline and they call a real professional out to diagnose the problem they wont have to look too hard to figure it out.

You know athletes on steroids look great for a while but in the long run that which made them so good causes their early demise.

Clients look to us for guidance, to know our craft. They may have ideas of how they like things to look but I have rarely had a client say "I don't care if it shortens the lifespan of the tree by 50% or more prune it like that."

Lastly if that's the look the client likes it can be achieved by making selective pruning cuts it won't be quite as tight but the look can be kept consistent and the trees will remain healthy. It will take longer but if they own 6 acres on the ocean cost should not be a concern. So its a win win you make more money and the trees get a better chance at survival.

That is if you are a professional and have the knowledge and skills to prune the tree properly...

Are you blind! They will never decline!! I have trained these trees to be trimmed this way. 10 years of trimming 2 times a year and I have never a had problem with the trees. These trees will turn into the ugly blobs touching the ground that you think looks good in 3 years if left alone. Did you look at the before pics thats only 9 months of growth. Your problem is your overly impressed with my work and you wish you had these skills. I am a humble person. I am not the best, but I am good at what I do because of many years of practice and experience.

Here is a few more pics especially for you.
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1834.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1806.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1764.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1911.jpg
http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1853.jpg

PerfectEarth
07-31-2011, 12:04 PM
http://www.plantamnesty.org/PRUNING/shearmadness.aspx

".... shearing does great violence to plants which have been chosen for their secondary characteristic of fine branch patterns. Such a plant is Star Magnolia, which is valued for its flowers, but is also valued for its beautiful branch patterns and fuzzy buds. Other trees and shrubs highly valued for their fine branch patterns are the double file viburnum, Harry Lauder's walking stick, Japanese maple and Eastern dogwood. Shearing ruins them."

(boxwoods above look great, btw...)

Az Gardener
07-31-2011, 01:38 PM
Are you blind! They will never decline!! I have trained these trees to be trimmed this way. 10 years of trimming 2 times a year and I have never a had problem with the trees. These trees will turn into the ugly blobs touching the ground that you think looks good in 3 years if left alone. Did you look at the before pics thats only 9 months of growth. Your problem is your overly impressed with my work and you wish you had these skills. I am a humble person. I am not the best, but I am good at what I do because of many years of practice and experience.


Wow10 years of a tree that has a 75 to 100 year lifespan :dizzy: if it takes monthly pruning to keep them healthy and looking good that's what it takes. But the fact is if you pruned them correctly making selective cuts you would have less vegetative growth and they would hold their shape better.

I have no interest in your "pruning skills" if you brought those pictures to me in an interview I would not hire you. I am more concerned in bringing up the standards of our industry, this is done by educating wherever possible.

I have not worked in the field consistently for nearly 20 years. I am ashamed to say I have a picture, similar to those you have provided, taken in 1980 with me proudly (and much thinner :laugh:) standing beside some Rosemary and Olives that looked very similar to your pictures.

The difference is that I was 19 and I have learned better. I still learn and I do teach and I am considered an expert in the industry by my peers here in AZ. So I'm not really jealous of your skill, just doing my part to raise the standards in the industry.

If you are as humble as you say, you will crack a book in the off season do some reading and come back a better more educated professional in the spring.

turfcarelawns
07-31-2011, 02:18 PM
I think what is being said by some of the guys is being taken out of context. They are not saying you are a "bad trimmer". The shapes you have pruned are great. I believe that was said. What they are saying, not in a "bashing" way, is that the landscape value of a Acer palmatum is a natural look. They are to be hand pruned to maintain a tight form, but not shaped. That is what is being said by others. I am not saying you aren't good at what you do, I am just saying that the outcome of the trees is unpleasant to the eye. The boxwoods and other shrubs look very clean and orderly. With the trees shaped it takes your focus off of the other greenery that is very clean. I know books are over rated and you learn more by being in the field, but the longevity of the plant is very important for the homeowner. I am not bashing your skills as a pruner or your work, just giving some helpful advice.

Snapper Jack
07-31-2011, 02:26 PM
http://www.plantamnesty.org/PRUNING/shearmadness.aspx

".... shearing does great violence to plants which have been chosen for their secondary characteristic of fine branch patterns. Such a plant is Star Magnolia, which is valued for its flowers, but is also valued for its beautiful branch patterns and fuzzy buds. Other trees and shrubs highly valued for their fine branch patterns are the double file viburnum, Harry Lauder's walking stick, Japanese maple and Eastern dogwood. Shearing ruins them."

(boxwoods above look great, btw...)
Thanks for posting the links, it's now in my favorites for educational purposes.For me, I think it's best to leave some character to avoid shocking the wife or neighbors and being labeled the butcher:laugh:

Mark Oomkes
07-31-2011, 03:45 PM
http://www.plantamnesty.org/PRUNING/shearmadness.aspx

".... shearing does great violence to plants which have been chosen for their secondary characteristic of fine branch patterns. Such a plant is Star Magnolia, which is valued for its flowers, but is also valued for its beautiful branch patterns and fuzzy buds. Other trees and shrubs highly valued for their fine branch patterns are the double file viburnum, Harry Lauder's walking stick, Japanese maple and Eastern dogwood. Shearing ruins them."

(boxwoods above look great, btw...)

Agreed, the boxwoods do look great.

OP, can you revisit this thread this winter with pics of the above trees and shrubs minus the leaves?

Then we can see if you are as good as you say you are.

AK0tA
07-31-2011, 08:08 PM
Lots of hot heads on here I see. Glad I joined these forums. From my 27" computer screen these maples look fantastic. Job well done! I know from experience that a job like this takes a lot of time, patience and an artfull eye. Don't let the old stuffies bring you down by telling you that IT MUST BE DONE by the BOOK.

From were I was trained to trim we had no book just a couple hundred years of experience. Longwood Gardens near philly has many japanese maples in many shapes and sizes. As does Busch Gardens, Great Adventure, Hershey Park and many more notable gardens around the globe. True fact is that the japanese maples will be stronger and healthier in a more natural state, however they can and will live healthy for 75+ years in any shape you desire to train them in.

I say ya gots a good eye, keep up the good work and happy pruning.

I think a few are trying to help and point out what they perceive to be "proper" technique, good to see just their approach is poor.

PL&L
07-31-2011, 08:38 PM
that doesnt even look close to right. The rest of the bushes look great though!

turfcarelawns
07-31-2011, 08:45 PM
Us "old stuffies" do go by the book. The landscape maintenance books written by other landscape maintenance professionals who have learned from there mistakes and passed that knowledge on to us present day landscape maintenance professionals. We all need to make sure we read and learn our profession. That is why clients hire us to perform these specific services. They intrust in us to have done our research about plants and proper maintenance techniques for our industry. We all have said that he is really good with a hedge trimmer, and the shrubs look excellent.

ArenaLandscaping
08-01-2011, 05:52 AM
that doesnt even look close to right. The rest of the bushes look great though!

Thanks for your 2 cents!! I would like to clarify something. I never said that the only way to trim a Jap maple is with a hedge trimmer These particular trees are trimmed this way to fit the landscape, I have many other customers with Jap maples and they are trimmed with a hand pruner and small pruning saw. I have read many, many books on horticulture. The thread was not "This is how you trim a jap maple". I have built my business with this account. I get paid a ridiculous amount of money to trim those trees that way. The simple fact is, I stand out from others and I will continue to do it that way.

Mark Oomkes
08-01-2011, 06:33 AM
Thanks for your 2 cents!! I would like to clarify something. I never said that the only way to trim a Jap maple is with a hedge trimmer These particular trees are trimmed this way to fit the landscape, I have many other customers with Jap maples and they are trimmed with a hand pruner and small pruning saw. I have read many, many books on horticulture. The thread was not "This is how you trim a jap maple". I have built my business with this account. I get paid a ridiculous amount of money to trim those trees that way. The simple fact is, I stand out from others and I will continue to do it that way.

Great, so we can look forward to those pics of the Jap maples when they are dormant?

Az Gardener
08-01-2011, 10:31 AM
Thanks for your 2 cents!! I would like to clarify something. I never said that the only way to trim a Jap maple is with a hedge trimmer These particular trees are trimmed this way to fit the landscape, I have many other customers with Jap maples and they are trimmed with a hand pruner and small pruning saw. I have read many, many books on horticulture. The thread was not "This is how you trim a jap maple". I have built my business with this account. I get paid a ridiculous amount of money to trim those trees that way. The simple fact is, I stand out from others and I will continue to do it that way.

If you think you stand out your mistaken because that's how the majority of everyone trims here (to my dismay) and much more intricate shapes than an umbrella.

I think the consensus is that hedge trimming is the overwhelming dominant method of trimming. You want to impress us do it by hand pruning.

JDiepstra
08-01-2011, 11:33 AM
5 pages of negativity in this thread tells me there are plenty of you guys who dont have enough lawns to mow. Perhaps you should buy a smaller mower so you can fill out your days a little. While i agree that it doesnt look natural, i think it fits well with the rest of the landscaping and the tree is obviously healthy.

ArenaLandscaping
08-01-2011, 01:56 PM
5 pages of negativity in this thread tells me there are plenty of you guys who dont have enough lawns to mow. Perhaps you should buy a smaller mower so you can fill out your days a little. While i agree that it doesnt look natural, i think it fits well with the rest of the landscaping and the tree is obviously healthy.

Thanks for your comments, you a few other guys on the forum know how to leave a comment or opinion without being rude or insulting. And yes this was a very negative thread!

Az Gardener
08-01-2011, 04:06 PM
I don't think it is negative... maybe spirited. I have to say the first guy who said you "Hacked them up" could have stated his position more gently but we are all big boys here.

Your response was less than professional, immediately lashing out against everyone who gave honest criticism of your methodology. Our intent is not to belittle you but to educate you and others following this thread. Many have quoted and provided links to industry standards documentation backing up our position. You have provided no documentation or industry standards to validate your trimming methods.

Yet you continue to throw gas on the fire by claiming we are all wrong and assaulting our skills, calling us jealous and other names even though you have no evidence or idea of what our skill level is, our level of horticultural education, our years of experience in the field. None of that matters to you because you just cant accept that anyone but you is right about this.

You are the one who posted your work for all the world to see, then later proclaimed you are humble. Your dialog illustrates anything but humility.

DIXIECONTRACTING
08-01-2011, 04:10 PM
I don't think it is negative... maybe spirited. I have to say the first guy who said you "Hacked them up" could have stated his position more gently but we are all big boys here.

Your response was less than professional, immediately lashing out against everyone who gave honest criticism of your methodology. Our intent is not to belittle you but to educate you and others following this thread. Many have quoted and provided links to industry standards documentation backing up our position. You have provided no documentation or industry standards to validate your trimming methods.

Yet you continue to throw gas on the fire by claiming we are all wrong and assaulting our skills, calling us jealous and other names even though you have no evidence or idea of what our skill level is, our level of horticultural education, our years of experience in the field. None of that matters to you because you just cant accept that anyone but you is right about this.

You are the one who posted your work for all the world to see, then later proclaimed you are humble. Your dialog illustrates anything but humility.

Ditto .......

Mark Oomkes
08-01-2011, 04:53 PM
I don't think it is negative... maybe spirited. I have to say the first guy who said you "Hacked them up" could have stated his position more gently but we are all big boys here.

Your response was less than professional, immediately lashing out against everyone who gave honest criticism of your methodology. Our intent is not to belittle you but to educate you and others following this thread. Many have quoted and provided links to industry standards documentation backing up our position. You have provided no documentation or industry standards to validate your trimming methods.

Yet you continue to throw gas on the fire by claiming we are all wrong and assaulting our skills, calling us jealous and other names even though you have no evidence or idea of what our skill level is, our level of horticultural education, our years of experience in the field. None of that matters to you because you just cant accept that anyone but you is right about this.

You are the one who posted your work for all the world to see, then later proclaimed you are humble. Your dialog illustrates anything but humility.

:drinkup::drinkup:

Even if you did attack me by saying I could have been more gentle. lol

flowergirl
08-01-2011, 05:02 PM
The shrubs do look good, but you totally embarrassed the Japanese Maple trees!!! They are the laugh of the neighborhood!! Other trees and shrubs are joking and making fun of them.... shame.... read a book or something. There are so many of you "hackers" out there. Learn how to prune properly...

ArenaLandscaping
08-01-2011, 05:19 PM
The shrubs do look good, but you totally embarrassed the Japanese Maple trees!!! They are the laugh of the neighborhood!! Other trees and shrubs are joking and making fun of them.... shame.... read a book or something. There are so many of you "hackers" out there. Learn how to prune properly...

Thanks for you ?professional? opinion. And thank you for insulting me. Boy the neighbors are sure laughing while I am trimming their shrubs and trees.:clapping: I have 6 other customers all in a row on the same street. I get big money for what I do.They saw what kind of work I do and were very impressed. 2 and 3 million dollar homes. If you say I am a hacker then your blind. You know nothing about me. Stick to planting flowers, flowergirl and stop following the leader with rude comments. A book could never have taught me what I have learned from experience.

Landscaperma
08-01-2011, 05:29 PM
You have destroyed all the plant material, you can say good bye to the Jap's. Read a few beginner gardening books to see what you have done wrong.

ArenaLandscaping
08-01-2011, 05:46 PM
You have destroyed all the plant material, you can say good bye to the Jap's. Read a few beginner gardening books to see what you have done wrong.

Did you read the whole thread? This NOT the first time these were trimmed like this. THEY HAVE BEEN TRAINED BY ME FOR 10 YEARS WITH A GAS POWERED HEDGE TRIMMER, HAND PRUNERS, SMALL PRUNING SAW. I DO NOT SEE WHAT PRUNING PRACTICES HAVE TO DO WITH FACT YOU PEOPLE ARE REALLY ONLY COMMENTING ON THE SHAPE. I DONT CARE WHAT SHAPE YOU THINK A TREE OR SHRUB HAS TO BE.MY CUTS ARE CORRECT. MY TRIMMER IS EXTREMELY SHARP AND CLEAN AND I AM ONLY CUTTING OFF GROWTH LESS THAN A 1/4 INCH IN DIAMETER. THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THIS AND THE GROWTH I CUT OFF THE BURNING BUSHES. ARE THEY RUINED, NO. Here are pics of the destroyed plant material. If you read the tread you would see I used Felco #2 hand pruner. I use them everyday. With your lack of knowledge of this thread. I cant see how you would have comment.

Before

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1808-1.jpg

After

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa381/jna1978/100_1833.jpg

slqlc
08-01-2011, 06:32 PM
So i guess he was just showing you his work, if you dont like the way he trimmed them dont trim them that way. Just my opinion

Snapper Jack
08-01-2011, 06:47 PM
That so called "TRAINED" Japanese Maple just looks ******ed,looks like an over sized mushroom out of Walt Disney 3-D cartoon. You obviously have some very strange or stupid clients who have been blindsided by your so expertise ways of pruning Jap maples, you have striped that poor tree it of it's natural beauty and character .

ArenaLandscaping
08-01-2011, 07:07 PM
That so called "TRAINED" Japanese Maple just looks ******ed,looks like an over sized mushroom out of Walt Disney 3-D cartoon. You obviously have some very strange or stupid clients who have been blindsided by your so expertise ways of pruning Jap maples, you have striped that poor tree it of it's natural beauty and character .

Thanks. I think it has been established that it looks like a mushroom or a umbrella. It has character of its own. Only one client has this done. Very hard to get that tree to look like that. ITS FOR THAT PROPERTY ONLY.

BINKY1902
08-02-2011, 01:27 AM
I think it looks good and sets the property apart. Tree looks very healthy as well.

ProMaintenance
08-02-2011, 01:27 AM
So last night I read this thread. I honestly had never heard of or seen a Japanese Maple trimmed in the manner of your pictures. Sure enough a client asked me this morning to take a hedge trimmer to a neglected 50 year old jap maple in his front yard. I just cringed and grabbed a saw and my felcos and did it the right way. When it comes to trees if i wouldn't do it in front of my arboriculture professor I wont do it.

lmlawn
01-05-2012, 03:50 PM
jap maples all look like that in RI....keep up the awesome work man!!

ArenaLandscaping
01-05-2012, 03:52 PM
jap maples all look like that in RI....keep up the awesome work man!!

Thanks man !!!

weeze
01-05-2012, 04:36 PM
i think they look awesome. that's how you want shrubs/trees around your house. very nice and tight and neat. you don't want them all bushy looking. people talk about natural? there's no such thing as natural trimming. in nature they are out in the woods and never ever get trimmed. you trim them to keep them neat around your house. and the mushroom look goes along well with the other shrubs. it would look dumb to keep the jap maples bushy looking while everything else was tight, neat, and smooth looking. there's nothing i hate more than a home with bushy looking shrubs and trees around it.

i'm not saying there is a right or wrong way to trim them. maybe there is a better way but who cares? so what if they only live 50 years instead of 75. they look very healthy to me. so who knows. it really doesn't matter. the owner could easily afford to buy new ones to plant there to replace them when the time comes which will probably not even happen in the owner's lifetime.

ArenaLandscaping
01-05-2012, 05:07 PM
i think they look awesome. that's how you want shrubs/trees around your house. very nice and tight and neat. you don't want them all bushy looking. people talk about natural? there's no such thing as natural trimming. in nature they are out in the woods and never ever get trimmed. you trim them to keep them neat around your house. and the mushroom look goes along well with the other shrubs. it would look dumb to keep the jap maples bushy looking while everything else was tight, neat, and smooth looking. there's nothing i hate more than a home with bushy looking shrubs and trees around it.

i'm not saying there is a right or wrong way to trim them. maybe there is a better way but who cares? so what if they only live 50 years instead of 75. they look very healthy to me. so who knows. it really doesn't matter. the owner could easily afford to buy new ones to plant there to replace them when the time comes which will probably not even happen in the owner's lifetime.

Thanks Jason !

carloslawnmaintain57
01-05-2012, 05:39 PM
They look great,Awesome Job u seen to pay attention to detail of this which is nice.U don't get much of that really today.

ArenaLandscaping
01-06-2012, 08:30 AM
They look great,Awesome Job u seen to pay attention to detail of this which is nice.U don't get much of that really today.

Thanks !!!!

Mark Oomkes
01-06-2012, 04:15 PM
Any chance we can see a pic of them now that the leaves are off?

ArenaLandscaping
01-06-2012, 05:07 PM
Any chance we can see a pic of them now that the leaves are off?

Sure, but it will have to be sometime next week. I will be in that area and I will take a few pictures of all the japanese maples.

LawnMan19
01-06-2012, 05:14 PM
Yeah, I don't trim jap maples like that but their kind of neat looking like that, and if that's how their kept where your at I understand. And your other shrub work looks great.:)