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wfd523
08-12-2011, 08:52 PM
Hello I am new to this forum and find the information very helpful. I have done about a dozen installations all using city water supply. I have someone that wants a job done but they already have an existing well. My question is that I tested the psi and gpm at the spigot. the psi was done with a gauge and gpm via the bucket test. Is this an acceptable place to take these readings for my design. From searching the internet I see some people actually tie into the water line right after the pump to take readings. I find this a lot of work to give an estimate and don't think most homeowners would want you to do that just to get a quote. They had two quotes already one guy tested same spot I did and the other never even looked at the pump well or turned on the water. any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mdirrigation
08-12-2011, 09:33 PM
Wells can be tricky , the bucket test is fine , but not accurate at all . what is the recovery rate of the well . What type of well is it , drilled , driven , shallow , deep . What horsepower pump , what size pipe ? Pressure is easy go inside and look at the gauge , its between 40 and 60 psi , thats the factory preset low and high limit . Get the information off the tag on the well , find out who has the records county or state

Wet_Boots
08-12-2011, 10:00 PM
Sometimes, the two smartest things you can do with respect to well water installs, is to run the supply through a 100-mesh strainer, and to write your proposal in a manner that allows you flexibility with the number of heads and zones.

Mike Leary
08-12-2011, 10:05 PM
All of the above is moot, except for MD's comment unless you know the re-charge rate of the well. In WA State, it is required and recorded on a "well log" , that not only the driller, but the State has on record. PSI & GPM are bs until the re-charge is known.

Wet_Boots
08-12-2011, 10:10 PM
I had a homeowner show me such a log - not accurate, not even close.

Mike Leary
08-12-2011, 10:16 PM
I had a homeowner show me such a log - not accurate, not even close.

That's par for your kind of clients. :p

Wet_Boots
08-12-2011, 10:17 PM
Hey, the check cleared - a prince among men payup

Mike Leary
08-12-2011, 10:31 PM
There are more mature methods of pump-down tests than the bucket.

AI Inc
08-13-2011, 05:14 AM
Dont bother sticking a pressure gauge on a well. What ya want to know is depth and flow rate.Sometimes this info was written on the pressure tank by the installer a lot of times it isnt. You can call the installer and get the info.

You can also ask the customer if he currently waters with hoses and if so does he run 2 at once and what happens when he does.If he says he cant or he does and they get weak after a 1/2 hr, definatly contact the well installer as there is not a whole lot of water there.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-13-2011, 08:09 AM
Not a well man but out of curiousity does the recharge rate change over time or during the season?
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AI Inc
08-13-2011, 08:17 AM
Typicly gets better as it ages. The grand canyon was once a stream, same thing happens underground.

greenmonster304
08-13-2011, 08:31 AM
Recharge rates rarely come into play here. I can only think of one system that would draw down enough to need a delay between stations and it was way up on a hill. Usually I will call the well installer and ask what I can expect for output if I am doing an estimate then when I get the job I do a flow test. Most of the irrigation wells here are quite shallow (50-80). With a 1.5 hp pump it will supply almost 30 gpm at all day.
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Wet_Boots
08-13-2011, 08:55 AM
Once you've worked an area, you will get an idea of what the wells can produce.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-13-2011, 09:41 AM
There are more mature methods of pump-down tests than the bucket.

Can't friggin believe you set the screws for the top on the ground. They could easily have been stepped on and buried or accidentally kicked into shrubs. C'mon MAN! Jeeeesh

Mike Leary
08-13-2011, 11:07 AM
Can't friggin believe you set the screws for the top on the ground. They could easily have been stepped on and buried or accidentally kicked into shrubs. C'mon MAN! Jeeeesh

I'll try to do better next time, 'ol eagle eyes. :rolleyes:

Kiril
08-13-2011, 11:37 AM
I'll try to do better next time, 'ol eagle eyes. :rolleyes:

Yea Dad .... only hacks put screws on the ground. :rolleyes:

Wet_Boots
08-13-2011, 11:49 AM
next time, he'll hire Screw Maidens to hold them.....

WalkGood
08-13-2011, 11:58 AM
Not a well man :laugh: but out of curiousity does the recharge rate change over time or during the season?


Hope you feel better soon! LOL

It depends on where the well is located. I have heard of wells that *used* to have unlimited water. But now the water table has lowered and the well has to be drilled much deeper to get consistent volume. Either that or you must drastically reduce draw volume, run shorter run times with pauses in between.

Anyone in the drought areas like TX experiencing wells running low or dry?

Mdirrigation
08-13-2011, 02:07 PM
We clearly state on our contract that the system needs xxx pressure and xxx flow to work properly , we record this at the time of an estimate . Any changes in pressure and or flow are not our responsibility , the quality , quantity , of the water are not our problem.

Mike Leary
08-13-2011, 03:39 PM
I took over a site where the well had failed due to a piss-poor water-wasting irrigation system. It was waterfront property on the salt chuck and all we could figure was the well had finally been drawn-down so many times that it allowed salt-water intrusion and contaminated the well. Lucky for the property owner, they had city water close by, but if the irrigation "pro" knew what he was doing, they could have saved what is now thousands a year in water bills.:hammerhead:

1idejim
08-14-2011, 12:45 PM
Wells can be tricky , the bucket test is fine , but not accurate at all . what is the recovery rate of the well . What type of well is it , drilled , driven , shallow , deep . What horsepower pump , what size pipe ? Pressure is easy go inside and look at the gauge , its between 40 and 60 psi , thats the factory preset low and high limit . Get the information off the tag on the well , find out who has the records county or state

Hello I am new to this forum and find the information very helpful. I have done about a dozen installations all using city water supply. I have someone that wants a job done but they already have an existing well. My question is that I tested the psi and gpm at the spigot. the psi was done with a gauge and gpm via the bucket test. Is this an acceptable place to take these readings for my design. From searching the internet I see some people actually tie into the water line right after the pump to take readings. I find this a lot of work to give an estimate and don't think most homeowners would want you to do that just to get a quote. They had two quotes already one guy tested same spot I did and the other never even looked at the pump well or turned on the water. any help would be greatly appreciated.

a 2 hour pumpdown test is the most important measurement test you can do.

Mdirrigation
08-14-2011, 04:15 PM
The pump down test is great , if you can get the homeowner to start it 2 hours before you get there .

1idejim
08-14-2011, 04:26 PM
The pump down test is great , if you can get the homeowner to start it 2 hours before you get there .

that's part of the job, analyzing the system. i wouldn't trust a home owner to do anything for you. in fact the irrigation system that i was telling you about last year where the ho had someone else do the job because he didn't want a pumpdown test taken and the other bidders said i didn't know what i was talking about. they punched a new well last week, my dad was doing some excavation near the site and talked to the driller (anyone spell lawsuit)

Wet_Boots
08-14-2011, 04:50 PM
You can get a handle on a well's usefulness in less time, if you keep a close eye on a pressure gauge while it is running steady (no cycling)