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Greenlandscaping
08-13-2011, 12:11 AM
I need a bigger trailer. Right now all the fall jobs i have set up the only way i can do them all is if i get a bigger trailer so i will be able to run my exmark and craftsman. My old man and i. They both have baggers. In the fall time is tight i only have about 20 hours of landscaping i can do a week. Thats why i tell all my clients to call and schedule now. Im a full time student. If i were to haul this 14 foot trailer with a craftsman rider, exmark 60 inch turf tracer, little wonder high output blower, and a toro 21 inch with a toyota tacoma v6 would it do alright? http://www.trailersplus.com/Utah/Murray/Trailers/CarryOn/4YMUL1410BM023286.php:confused:

PlantscapeSolutions
08-13-2011, 12:51 AM
A 14' single is a fragile trailer that will be very damage prone. The weight balance will be a challenge as well. You will find fish tailing will be more of a problem if the weight load is off even a little. With a 60" and other stuff on the trailer one good pothole or bump will be all it takes to damage the bearings and eject a wheel.

Spending as little as $200 to add a second axle would be money well spent. You should plan on spending some money for electric brakes and a controller as well. With a Tecoma a 14' trailer is going to be more then the truck brakes can handle. You'll end up wearing out the trucks brakes prematurely and your stopping distance will be dangerously extended.

Falcon50EX
08-13-2011, 10:34 PM
A 14' single is a fragile trailer that will be very damage prone. The weight balance will be a challenge as well. You will find fish tailing will be more of a problem if the weight load is off even a little. With a 60" and other stuff on the trailer one good pothole or bump will be all it takes to damage the bearings and eject a wheel.

Spending as little as $200 to add a second axle would be money well spent. You should plan on spending some money for electric brakes and a controller as well. With a Tecoma a 14' trailer is going to be more then the truck brakes can handle. You'll end up wearing out the trucks brakes prematurely and your stopping distance will be dangerously extended.

I second the above. If you are going to stay in this business then go ahead and get a 16' the single 14' will not last at all.

unkownfl
08-14-2011, 08:00 PM
I think you could have problems backing the tandem axle setup with such a small truck. When you start to back up and get it turning it will want to lift the back end of that truck up in the air and your tires will start to spin. I'm not even sure if it's legal to even pull a 7k rated trailer with that truck.

PlantscapeSolutions
08-14-2011, 09:00 PM
I think you could have problems backing the tandem axle setup with such a small truck. When you start to back up and get it turning it will want to lift the back end of that truck up in the air and your tires will start to spin. I'm not even sure if it's legal to even pull a 7k rated trailer with that truck.

Until you get to 26,001 GCWR there is very little regulation of trailers. Usually you have to get into triple 7K axle setups or twin 10K axle setups before the regs get strict.

I'm constantly amazed at the overloaded 1/2 ton & less trucks and trailers going down the road but they never get pulled over. Pull onto a scale with your commercially registered truck and trailer and there will be no warning for being even a little over weight.

unkownfl
08-14-2011, 09:58 PM
Until you get to 26,001 GCWR there is very little regulation of trailers. Usually you have to get into triple 7K axle setups or twin 10K axle setups before the regs get strict.

I'm constantly amazed at the overloaded 1/2 ton & less trucks and trailers going down the road but they never get pulled over. Pull onto a scale with your commercially registered truck and trailer and there will be no warning for being even a little over weight.

Yea I thought the same thing, until I seen a Uhaul and my personal f350 get pulled over and weighed. The road we were on was a 10 ton weight limit. I did have a enclosed trailer hooked up but it was not over due to it only had my race car inside.

lawnspecialties
08-19-2011, 02:22 PM
I've had two 14' single axle trailers. One I still have right now. I rarely use it anymore but when I did, it did absolutely fine. I would often put a 148 Gravely, Honda 21", and a 260 Gravely on it. It pulled fine with no problems.

No fishtailling, balance, or anything else mentioned. My only big concern was getting a flat tire. Make sure you have a spare since you only have one tire per side.

For what its worth, my dealer every now and then will have a 7x14' single axle with the 5200 lb. axle. Tough little trailer right there.

In my opinion, for what you're looking for, if it all fits on the trailer, you'll be fine.

JDiepstra
08-19-2011, 02:43 PM
I agree with the above poster. Dont listen to the other guys bs. Also, do yourself a favor and put a mulch kit on the 60.

4 seasons lawn&land
08-19-2011, 04:55 PM
I love my 14 single. It also has the 5000lb axle. It is pretty light construction, thats why I bought it. Its strictly for the two 60" z's and a dingo when I rent that. I have larger trailers when I need them though. I like the single 14 footer better than the 7x14 all aluminum enclosed that I used last year. You gotta love picking the thing up to set it on the ball! Sometimes simple is better! Singles are light enough to tow empty with a flat, to get to the shop.

PlantscapeSolutions
08-19-2011, 05:20 PM
I love my 14 single. It also has the 5000lb axle. It is pretty light construction, thats why I bought it. Its strictly for the two 60" z's and a dingo when I rent that. I have larger trailers when I need them though. I like the single 14 footer better than the 7x14 all aluminum enclosed that I used last year. You gotta love picking the thing up to set it on the ball! Sometimes simple is better! Singles are light enough to tow empty with a flat, to get to the shop.

The problem with driving with a flat is there's a good chance your going to beat the fender all to hell. The great thing about a tandem is you don't need a jack. Just drive the good tire & axle up onto a block of wood you keep stashed and the axle with a flat will be up in the air. You can do a really quick tire change and be on your way.

XLS
08-19-2011, 05:49 PM
unhook the trailer and jack it all the way down then place a 2"x6" under the rear of the trailer on the effective side then jack the tongue up and hook it back to the trailer then place a block of wood under the jack, and jack the jack down,picking up the front of the trailer and the tire. we do it 20 times a year. and you will never need a jack
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PlantscapeSolutions
08-20-2011, 12:26 AM
I had a 6'-4" X 12' that we put about 150,000 miles on. Soon after I had it made I regretted not going tandem and a few feet longer. My trailer spent most of it's life pulling two 36" WB's and a few hundred pounds of blowers, trimmers, fuel, ect.

The biggest problem with a single is you can always be loaded under capacity but encounter a pothole or decent bump that causes most of the trailer weight to shift to one end of the axle. You can hit a big bump with a trailer that weighs 1000 lbs and contains 1500 lbs of gear but the bump magnifies the load and puts more pressure on the bearings and backing plates then they can handle. The impact of bumps can also take a toll on the leaf springs and other hardware.

I had bearing buddies on my trailer and kept it well greased. Here's what broke on my single 12' with a 3500 lb axle.

1. Once the whole backing plate welds let loose and ejected the whole tire with the bearings and backing plate still attached.

2. Another time we hit a pothole from hell at a slow speed and the trailer weight all shifted to the side of the axle where the pothole was. The result was a blown tire and I headed home to inspect my trailer just to be safe. I made it 20 miles back to my street and got within a stones throw of my house only to have the bearings let lose and send a tire flying into my neighbors yard. I made a drag mark with my axle that went 60' down the street.

2. Two other times we had the bearings suddenly go to pot and leave my crew stranded. The axle ends were damaged so we just replaced the whole axle.

3. Twice we had leaf springs get stress cracks and break leaving my guys stranded.

On a tandem the weight is more evenly distributed so one tire and bearing assembly will never end up trying to support the entire weight of the trailer if you hit a pothole or bump. To me having a single was just too much of a liability.

A tandem gives you a trailer that can handle wear and tear much better. You can have dual electric brakes and saver wear on your truck. The tandem is not as picky about not being perfectly balanced. The huge benefit of a tandem is you have a more flexible trailer that can handle hauling heavy cargo like mulch.

My crew now runs a 16' enclosed tandem and loves it. I have tandems, triples, and tandem dually's as well as two singles in the past so I'm speaking from experience when it comes to trailers. I owned pretty much every axle configuration you'll see towed behind a truck. I find that no matter what capacity trailer you buy at times you'll wish it could handle more.

PlantscapeSolutions
08-20-2011, 12:43 AM
unhook the trailer and jack it all the way down then place a 2"x6" under the rear of the trailer on the effective side then jack the tongue up and hook it back to the trailer then place a block of wood under the jack, and jack the jack down,picking up the front of the trailer and the tire. we do it 20 times a year. and you will never need a jack
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Sounds like you trailer has a black cloud following you around. That would be a flat tire every 18.2 days. Sounds like your trailer is cursed. :laugh:

XLS
08-20-2011, 02:54 PM
lol at times it feels like it.
we have several trailers still that the guys use but we are moving away from thm all togather.
mostof the trailers left are single axle because th tandoms eat rear tires bad and the more you haul on them the worse it gets.
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shadrach
08-20-2011, 05:16 PM
Tandem trailer w/brakes on both axles - much safer & less wear on the truck.

XLS
08-20-2011, 05:39 PM
dont no one think i am bashing them because what i write in 12 years in this industry I will use examples from some of you guys but its not a bash.
No Traileris any safer the the next
pot holes will not damage a tire,hub, axle.. however a pothole can cause a blow out which can cause more damage IF THE TRAILER IS LOADED HEAVY.

A 3K Axle isto small if you load it daily at 80% rating

a 3 k axle is still 5k tested
just for you overload guys safety
you can get a single axle with brakes.

we have had axels get twisted and odd stuff happed to tandoms (had a 3500 axle break with 1800lbs on it and was 3 months old never even used it for anything heavy.

ultimately it is the drivers fault what happends to a trailer considering pot holes dont move and you are the driver.

so any trailer you buy at 14` if it is for hauling 2400 lbs of equipment as long as it is not a cheap 3000-3500 lbs axel and it has brakes will searve you fine if you can drive with comon sense.
we have never had one trailer with actual brakes and REGUARDLES of they were loaded with 2 pallets of sod, a bobcat T25 or 2 or 3mowers and all the usual equipment in 12 years no one has wrecked because of that fact. common sense goes a long ways with a trailer.
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PlantscapeSolutions
08-20-2011, 11:26 PM
dont no one think i am bashing them because what i write in 12 years in this industry I will use examples from some of you guys but its not a bash.
No Traileris any safer the the next
pot holes will not damage a tire,hub, axle.. however a pothole can cause a blow out which can cause more damage IF THE TRAILER IS LOADED HEAVY.

A 3K Axle isto small if you load it daily at 80% rating

a 3 k axle is still 5k tested
just for you overload guys safety
you can get a single axle with brakes.

we have had axels get twisted and odd stuff happed to tandoms (had a 3500 axle break with 1800lbs on it and was 3 months old never even used it for anything heavy.

ultimately it is the drivers fault what happends to a trailer considering pot holes dont move and you are the driver.

so any trailer you buy at 14` if it is for hauling 2400 lbs of equipment as long as it is not a cheap 3000-3500 lbs axel and it has brakes will searve you fine if you can drive with comon sense.
we have never had one trailer with actual brakes and REGUARDLES of they were loaded with 2 pallets of sod, a bobcat T25 or 2 or 3mowers and all the usual equipment in 12 years no one has wrecked because of that fact. common sense goes a long ways with a trailer.
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It was probably back in 2003 when my tire blew and it damaged the bearings and it ended up spitting out the rim & tire on my street. The trailer only had a Scag 36" WB on it that was about 400 lbs and about 200 lbs of other stuff. I was at a stop sign pulling out of a new Home Depot in Bee Caves TX.

Where the drive to the Home Depot and the main road intersected the edge of the road had been eroded about 4-6". As I turned right onto the main road the right rear tire just barely dropped over the edge of the pavement into the hole. I was probably only going 10 mph but as the tire dropped off the edge of the road it caused all of the weight of the trailer to instantly shift to one tire. The tire immediately blew out.

We stopped and put on the spare and everything looked normal but I just had a feeling that something was awry. I damn sure glad my trailer came apart on my street and not on a busy highway. If that tire had gone into oncoming traffic going 60 mph who knows what would have happened.

XLS
08-20-2011, 11:55 PM
AND YOUR BLAMMING THE AXLE OR TIRE?????
I stated I also had a 3500 axle break in half on the tandom too
it had a load of fence row brush and 12 concrete block chuncks where a retaing wall on a basment entryway had broke .

We started shaking after turnning onto the main road into town from the narrow driveway then we got up to posted speed 35 mph .it started swaying a little and the wheel was bobbing in and out of the fender well I told the guys to hold on and before I could stop it had turnd us a complete 360 in the road .The Highway patrol weighed it at 1800 lbs and found the tongue weight was suffecient to prevent the initial issue of fish tailing and they said what happened was the part of the axle the bearings ride on had bent in the turn off of the driveway and as the trailer rocked back and forth just bent it more because a rim is designed to hold vertical loads not horizontal ones . as for the axle snapping they said it had to be becasue of the 360 My insurace wasnt wanting to pay and after they made their statement as to why we were stuck in the road for a hour the insurance had to pay . the insurance had initially said we were overloaded.

Point is if I had not run off the road with the rear wheel it may not had caused my problem .

if I had to bet on your case it wasnt the load on your trailer at all but the fact the tire pinched and poped in that hole as you turned and in a way twisted everything as you pulled away that caused your bearing failure initially unless you did simular to me and instead of breaking the axle you just damaged the bearrings causing the hub to fall of which is a verry fast ordeal if your ball bearrings fall out .

Honestly i never even noticed if my bearings were damaged after the wheel was at a 33 degree angle from under the fender well and they had to tow it out of the road due to the broke axle .

so i guess me and you know some messed up stuff can , CAN happen but its not the trailers overall fault but our decissions we made while pulling it . I know back then a 350.00 axle if i had only been 2" further over the other way i would never had framed it out on the culvert.

PlantscapeSolutions
08-21-2011, 12:29 AM
After the blowout we quit using 55 psi trailer tires and started using E rated 80 psi tires that were pretty much impossible to blow out. Every trailer I own runs E rated tires now. Wear and tear on 22 tires that average $120 each gets expensive.

XLS
08-21-2011, 08:37 AM
we actually use tires that are rated for RV`s from a }<dealer local to us and they run in the $120.00 range as well and we never have had a phantom blow out. i think they are 8 ply and worth every penny. yet i see trailers with car tires and they drive all over,to me they are asking for problems but they make out fine.
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PlantscapeSolutions
08-21-2011, 11:11 AM
we actually use tires that are rated for RV`s from a }<dealer local to us and they run in the $120.00 range as well and we never have had a phantom blow out. i think they are 8 ply and worth every penny. yet i see trailers with car tires and they drive all over,to me they are asking for problems but they make out fine.
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Here the best place for tires is Discount Tire. They will even match Tirerack.com prices. I always get the flat protection because over the life of a tire 2-3 nail or screw punctures seems to be the norm. I usually get the Carlisle tires. I never usually get total blow outs it's normally slow leak type punctures.

With a tandem you don't even know you have a leak until you get to your destination. You can be down to 10 psi and it's not a problem. The tandems tend to leave you stuck on the side of the road changing a tire a whole lot less.

My triple axle trailer tends to eat the rear tires because it tends to drag the rear tires when turning. It has no clean pivot point like a single or tandem. But on my two 16' tandems we get very even wear on both axles. I bet your guys are making lots of very tight slow speed turns )tight jobsites and small cul de sacs).

I think guys trying to back up a tandem into a driveway or area that is perpendicular to your approach angle can cause the most wear. This is especially trues if they don't make a nice clean wide arcing turn. It's those little tight turns that tend to leave marks on the drive and wear out your tires more quickly.

Foremen aren't paying for new tires so they usually don't even think about things like this. Some times you have to point out the wear and tell them that changing the way they drive will greatly minimize the problem.

XLS
08-21-2011, 11:55 AM
you are right yep . I knew the factors in the tire wear . it is 18' long tucks pulling 14'-16' trailers and trying to turn around in 40 fot cul-de-sacs but what we see that wore them out the most was turning from a 8' wide drive way on to a 18' blacktop road that did the most damage . slow speed and streering wheel locketo stay out of the far ditch.But it is all to common that a LCO has to back into or out of a driveway or has to swing tight to clear the mailbox or curb in a cul de sac.
our box trucks are far better in these enviroments if i must say . have went all year with a 14' box hauling 3 ztr 3 trimers 2 blowers shovels,rakes and other hand tools ,hedge trimmer, pole trimmer, 2-5 gal backpack sprayers,2- 1 gallon sprayers 4-32oz hand sprayer bottles with 10 gallons of pre mixed chemicals 2-5 gallon water coolers,a 35 gallon garbage can, 50 trash bags, 10- 8'x8' tarps chainsaw and a 8'and 12' ladder
all on the same set of tires and they still look brand new.

PlantscapeSolutions
08-21-2011, 12:25 PM
The slightly shorter cab on the 2500 Rams is another good thing. My 06' has the quadcab and a long bed but is shorter then the four door Ford or GM trucks. Turning is better with your trailer.

Plus who needs their guys to have all kinds of room to get comfy and enjoy the AC? I want my guy to get have just enough room to go short distances and be comfortable. I think I should get some itchy wool seat covers made!

XLS
08-21-2011, 12:53 PM
lmao at the wool seat covers could just do fire ants. cant seem to get rid of them here and i had a truck load once lol . they got on one guy and he did nt know it as we all loaded up 10 minutes later we were out of the truck .took a half hour to clean them out . socks, shoes, carpet ,seat . It was BAD

JDiepstra
08-21-2011, 01:01 PM
Anybody notice the OP hasn't made a post in this thread since his first? Wonder if he ever came back. Personally I have had good luck with my 12' single (no brakes!) over the past 5 years but as I am growing there have been many times I would kill to have a 16' dual. I see a lot of pluses to a lighter trailer that will use less gas, wear less tires, etc etc but it stinks not being able to take my 60, 48, and 36 all at the same time because I also have to take my quickdump for my 60" with me. And boy in the Spring it would be sweet to fit a few more yards of mulch in the 16'.