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View Full Version : Mowing is not a job... then what else do you call it?!


flyingdutch16
09-06-2011, 09:33 PM
Sooo lately a lot of people ask me where do you work. I just tell i mow lawns for my self. 9/10 times I get a response like this, Mowing is not a job... its just so that you can make a little extra money.

Now can some one please explain to me how the hell mowing is not a job?! I mean i work probably harder then them who work at a fast food restaurant or where ever they get hired. I just dont get it! Its probably just the youth of these siting on there lazy asses playing xbox all day.

Oh im 16 btw and mow 8 lawns.

Sorry guys i just had to vent about it. it was just really making me mad saying that mowing isnt a job. I mean i know its not a fully established business yet but im getting closer and closer and really do work hard to get it a fully established business.

Turf Commando
09-06-2011, 09:50 PM
My wife didn't think mowing was work until she joined me for half day never again will she disrespect the industry..

Tell them to pound sand when questioned about your job..

ReddensLawnCare
09-06-2011, 09:58 PM
I think you will get a lot more respect when you get older and have your own truck and trailer....I just went through your picture thread and it looks like you do a great job with what you have. I am 22 and still get looks from people when I tell them I own a full service lawn and landscape company ( I choose to say that rather than I mow grass) I am fully legit with all my licenses and what not and insurance. You will have people tell you on here that you have to look professional to be taken as a pro, and to a point that is right, but not all the time. I can tell from your pictures that you live in a very nice neighborhood and from my experience, those people are looking for the professional look, not just in the end product, but in the presentation of your services. I have two 1 million plus homes and if I rolled up with crappy looking equipment and like a didnt give a rats a** then I would probably be fired even though the yards look fantastic. I respect that you are doing the best you can with what you have and you should be very proud of yourself, and so should your parents. Another thing you may want to consider...I noticed in the beginning of your pic thread you mentioned that two of your customers had the "pros" come and mow and that you lost out on $70 which means your are mowing those yards for 35. I would most likely assume that in that area, with those size properties, and with all the services you are doing to make them look great, your competition is probably charging around 70 per cut per yard.
I know you asked about insurance and such, and that is something you really need to look into as soon as possible. It is vital to run an operation in this industry. Get everything you need to run a business and try to do as much as you can without any money from your parents (IDK if you are getting any now?) Once you know all the expenses associated with running a "business" you might see why people dont take you seriously at the current time when you are mowing 3/4 acre high income properties for 35.
By expenses (and I am only putting so much time into this b/c I am bored) I am talking about insurance, taxes, payroll (if you have a helper) licenses, wear and tear on equipment, depreciation, savings, phone bill, fuel, and so on. Really consider all these things. I can tell you for certain that if I mowed any of those properties in those pictures for 35, I would probably break even or might make a little if I can get it done in under 1 hour with another employee, which Im sure I could.

With all that said, keep your chin up man! Be proud of what you have accomplished and dont let anyone get you down, it is so not worth it. And im sure bobcat48 will give you some encouragement as well...lol..I had too

Good Luck and PM me if you need any further advice or help ( I feel like Dr. Phil?)

cuttin-to-the-Max
09-06-2011, 10:54 PM
yeah dont say the usual line "i cut grass" or "i mow lawns." It makes you sound like a little immature kid. Say i run a Landscaping business! haha

best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Keep doin what you're doin. school first,work second. This is from the heart: im 37 years old and have been doing lawns,landscape, and snow since i was 19 "officially/ legally" It was good money...(could go out and party, go on dates,etc) Now with a wife and son. Its not really the best money. Well also with the econ. being the way it is!

If i could do it all over again i would of been a doctor or something... Not just some "lawn jockey"<<People call us! No offense to anyone else who is in the same business.
I also wouldnt of ever cut anyone else's lawn other than my own!

By all means im not trying to discourage you, but educate you. Im sure you do a great job and are proud of yourself but im trying to help you out so you dont end up like me! Im no small company either pushing 12 guys a day! These lowballers are ruining it for everyone!

CL&T
09-07-2011, 01:13 AM
best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I disagree. Who do you think many of those lowballers are? College grads who can't find work or those that had a good job then got laid off. You are way ahead of the game working and earning money right after high school instead of partying four years in some diploma mill, getting yourself $200K in debt then not finding work.

Don't get me started on how 50% of kids do not belong in college. If you don't have a clear goal and an excellent chance of employment upon graduation in your field when you enter a college you don't belong there.

On of the reasons this country is in the mess it's in is because of thinking like yours. We have a generation whose parents, mostly hard workers like ourselves back in the 50's, wanted a "better life" for their kids. So every kid had to have a college education and the result was they don't want to get their hands dirty, have an attitude towards those who do and feel entitled to as much money as possible.

Being in the trades or doing manual work today is considered a stigma and so our workforce is rapidly declining as we retire and our sons or daughters aren't taking our places as they once did. So we are inundated with illegals "doing the work nobody wants to do".

There's the rest of your lowballers.

topsites
09-07-2011, 02:37 AM
I don't think mowing is a job either.

vencops
09-07-2011, 07:14 AM
NEVER take anyone seriously who tells you NOT to stay in school.

Having an education and not "thinking" you're needing it........is 1,000X better than the alternative.

yardguy28
09-07-2011, 07:21 AM
i personally would never tell anyone NOT to say in school but on the flip side i would never tell anyone TO stay in school.

school isn't for everyone. i graduated from highschool and wasted 2 years in college never finishing.

i personally would haven't been better off to skip college all together.

but again i'm not telling anyone to stay or not stay in school. it's a personal choice that each person has to make.

RussellB
09-07-2011, 07:23 AM
Why would you feel a need to respond to silly statements. Sometimes it's is best to ignore.
Posted via Mobile Device

David Haggerty
09-07-2011, 08:05 AM
It's not a JOB, it's a PROFESSION. A job is where you work hard as you can and give most of the profit to the boss!
My nephew has a job as a mechanic. They charge the customer $80/hr and pay him $10/hr. Now that's a job! Maybe a grease job or a lube job but it's a job. He's a professional mechanic working a job.

I congratulate you on your independence. You may be 16, but you're the boss. (Well the customer's the boss) but it's up to you to pick and choose customers.
I havn't had a "job" since 1983. Looking around at all those people who HAD jobs and now are not working, I believe I've made the right choice.

knox gsl
09-07-2011, 09:24 AM
Its not a job its your business. I have been jobless for almost 5 years now and love it. I have alot more freedom and income than when I was clocking in daily.

As far as school goes, I wish I had gone to college and got some kind of formal education. I consider myself a smart person, but wish that I was better educated, and there is a difference.

Glenn Lawn Care
09-07-2011, 10:34 AM
It's not a job if you enjoy doing it.... that's how I look at it!

GreenI.A.
09-07-2011, 11:38 AM
the problem you state is because many kids get nearly useless degrees. How may major in Art or History with high hopes, then graduate and maybe a few get there dream job, but many of them find they can't fand anthing paying for that degree other than teaching. I know a guy who works a large national landscape comapany. Worked there all through college when he got his History degree, now after graduating he is still working for brickman because that pays better than anything he can do with his history degree untill he finishes graduate school. On the other end, I'm running what most here would consider a successful company, and I'm back in school working on towards my masters degree. Last semester we were in a class where we had to talk about anxieties and a common one for many of the students was finding a good job after graduating. Students were saying that if they could find a job paying in 50k+ a year then they wouldn't be in school. I just laughed and told them I'm 10 years older than them, make more than that, and I'm here. Learn from my mistake and get it done right away. The important thing is don't just go to get an easy degree, if you don't have your heart set on something in particular go for general business. Atleast then if you decide to stay in this industry you'll have a degree that you can use a business owner. At the minimum gat an associates degree, it will help you learn to run a business and if you decide to go further you will already have a good amount of credits.

I could poll 1000 people right now in all different industries, and I am sure many more will say they wish they went to school than will say they wich they hadn't.

Plus the biggest reason is college is filled with girls

best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I disagree. Who do you think many of those lowballers are? College grads who can't find work or those that had a good job then got laid off. You are way ahead of the game working and earning money right after high school instead of partying four years in some diploma mill, getting yourself $200K in debt then not finding work.

Don't get me started on how 50% of kids do not belong in college. If you don't have a clear goal and an excellent chance of employment upon graduation in your field when you enter a college you don't belong there.

On of the reasons this country is in the mess it's in is because of thinking like yours. We have a generation whose parents, mostly hard workers like ourselves back in the 50's, wanted a "better life" for their kids. So every kid had to have a college education and the result was they don't want to get their hands dirty, have an attitude towards those who do and feel entitled to as much money as possible.

Being in the trades or doing manual work today is considered a stigma and so our workforce is rapidly declining as we retire and our sons or daughters aren't taking our places as they once did. So we are inundated with illegals "doing the work nobody wants to do".

There's the rest of your lowballers.

flyingdutch16
09-07-2011, 04:45 PM
@ReddensLawnCare, thanks for lenthy reply reallly appreciated your response. Sure made me feel better about my little mowing opperation. You're right I mow those property's for $35, now most of you will think that this is lowballing, I'm not gonna deny it, it's pretty much lowballing. Anyways I still make a good profit after i take off gas,equipment cost, and insurance so im not complaining. I do have to say tho every lawn that i get from now on I will start charging at least $45. Anyways lots of you said stay in school, and dont worry my parents and I my self will make sure that I stay in school. Im thinking about taking either business that way if i dont like the landscaping/mowing business i also have a genereal education in business and can find a job in a different line of work. On the other hand i really like what im doing right now and would love to own my own company and get an education in agriculture or landscape design. But hey ive got a couple years to decide to so not to worried about it right.

Just wanna say thanks so much guys for all the responses, it just really shows how good of a community this forum has and how one can learn from this forum!

CL&T
09-07-2011, 04:58 PM
the problem you state is because many kids get nearly useless degrees. How may major in Art or History with high hopes, then graduate and maybe a few get there dream job, but many of them find they can't fand anthing paying for that degree other than teaching. I know a guy who works a large national landscape comapany. Worked there all through college when he got his History degree, now after graduating he is still working for brickman because that pays better than anything he can do with his history degree untill he finishes graduate school.

Right. Those are the 50% I'm talking about. High school used to get you ready to deal with life and employment. Sadly today, all it is is a preschool for college. Doesn't matter if you are not college material- that's all you are given and then you are made to feel like you were riding the short bus if you go against political correctness and decide not to "stay in school" by going on to a trade school or employment. By the way, "stay in school" used to mean complete and graduate from high school. So that's why there are so many kids with useless degrees, unemployable and in debt when they are only 22.

On the other end, I'm running what most here would consider a successful company, and I'm back in school working on towards my masters degree. Last semester we were in a class where we had to talk about anxieties and a common one for many of the students was finding a good job after graduating. Students were saying that if they could find a job paying in 50k+ a year then they wouldn't be in school. I just laughed and told them I'm 10 years older than them, make more than that, and I'm here. Learn from my mistake and get it done right away. The important thing is don't just go to get an easy degree, if you don't have your heart set on something in particular go for general business. Atleast then if you decide to stay in this industry you'll have a degree that you can use a business owner. At the minimum get an associates degree, it will help you learn to run a business and if you decide to go further you will already have a good amount of credits.

What you have done comes from maturity and some life experience. Asking a 17 year old kid who's only experience is an iPhone and xBox to decide what they are going to do for the rest of their life is insane. Some do have a career mapped out but most don't. That level of maturity just isn't there any more. It's been taken away by coddling parents and schools. Advising to at least get a business degree isn't going to help if that kid has no aspirations in that direction (if they have any aspirations at all). It's much better to do what you did- figure out what you want to do then educate yourself in that direction.

Students were saying that if they could find a job paying in 50k+ a year then they wouldn't be in school. I just laughed and told them I'm 10 years older than them, make more than that, and I'm here.

I think what they were saying was that they are in school because they couldn't find a job. It's just something to do.

I could poll 1000 people right now in all different industries, and I am sure many more will say they wish they went to school than will say they wish they hadn't.

See, that's just wishful thinking at a time when times are tough. The grass is alway greener until you get to that other side and find that it's not so green after all. I can say that I wish I had done many things differently in my life but I can't say with any certainty that things would be any different than they are today. On the other hand I can wish that things had happened differently in my life but unfortunately none of us has that power.

KrayzKajun
09-07-2011, 05:52 PM
So what yall are saying is my degree in clay pottery isn't gunna help me?
Posted via Mobile Device

GreenI.A.
09-07-2011, 06:21 PM
So what yall are saying is my degree in clay pottery isn't gunna help me?
Posted via Mobile Device

Hey, thats not to bad. I know a girl who got her bachalers in weaving at a school thats 20k a semester. She has about 200k in students loans, and now she is starting her masters for it. By the time she is done she'll be close to 350-400k in debt and all she'll be qualified to do is teach weaving at the university level.

flyingdutch16
09-07-2011, 07:02 PM
Hey, thats not to bad. I know a girl who got her bachalers in weaving at a school thats 20k a semester. She has about 200k in students loans, and now she is starting her masters for it. By the time she is done she'll be close to 350-400k in debt and all she'll be qualified to do is teach weaving at the university level.

I sure as hell know a better/ more profitable way to spend 350 k :)

TimNNJ
09-07-2011, 07:11 PM
Good thread...your young..no matter what you do...always keep learning...take classes..go to seminars...go to college..never stop learning...I went to college..have an Art degree...I wish I was a math major..it would of been easier then all the hours I had to put into the art program...but now I have all the design background which helps with designs and what not...miss my pottery class..that was a good one..graduated college..kept bartending/waiting/landscaping...got a job at a big brokerage house..worked two years..hated every minute..came home one day and told my wife now that I was going to quit my job and I wouldn't care if I was poor from now on..I would never go back to it..that was 2006...back to bartending/waiting/landscaping...this is my fourth season full time...going through the growing pains...but couldn't be happier ....that is just my little rant ..your very young and have a while to figure things out..but never stop learning..and i'm 31

MowingMowingMowing
09-07-2011, 09:43 PM
best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I disagree. Who do you think many of those lowballers are? College grads who can't find work or those that had a good job then got laid off. You are way ahead of the game working and earning money right after high school instead of partying four years in some diploma mill, getting yourself $200K in debt then not finding work.

Don't get me started on how 50% of kids do not belong in college. If you don't have a clear goal and an excellent chance of employment upon graduation in your field when you enter a college you don't belong there.

On of the reasons this country is in the mess it's in is because of thinking like yours. We have a generation whose parents, mostly hard workers like ourselves back in the 50's, wanted a "better life" for their kids. So every kid had to have a college education and the result was they don't want to get their hands dirty, have an attitude towards those who do and feel entitled to as much money as possible.

Being in the trades or doing manual work today is considered a stigma and so our workforce is rapidly declining as we retire and our sons or daughters aren't taking our places as they once did. So we are inundated with illegals "doing the work nobody wants to do".

There's the rest of your lowballers.

So far from the truth...

First off, the only way you will have $200K in loans is if you go to an ivy league school with no scholarships. State school college can be done for roughly $15K a year in most Midwest states (even adding in living expenses, you are no where close to $200K).

If you don't have a clear goal and an excellent chance of employment upon graduation in your field when you enter a college you don't belong there.

Are you serious? While I agree that it is good to have a clear plan coming into school, it is not the end of the world if you don't initially. Gen eds are going to make up the majority of your first 2 years anyways, plenty of people don't figure out their major until then. "Undecided" as a major is pretty common for freshmen, you're statement is simply not accurate.

Alternatively, I do agree with the other posters about how you shouldn't waste your time getting a worthless degree.

One last thing I will throw out there, is my opinion on business degrees. DO NOT major in marketing or general business. If you are GB, many employers see this as you have no expertise. Regarding marketing, those guys have a really hard time getting a job out of school, not enough jobs in the field. I also view management as a bit of a waste too, all you learn is theory.

IMO, if you're not sure what you want to major in, choose finance, accounting, or economics. Finance and accounting actually provide some quantitative skills that are of value, they are not just memorizing theory.

Also, no matter what you're degree is, networking is almost as important. The old phrase "It's not what you know, it's who you know" is still true today. Reach out to alumni (you can use LinkedIn for this), go to events, career fairs, etc.

Finally, if you actually want a shot at getting a job upon graduation, you need to have done summer internships. If not, you're just one of the thousands of resumes employers get. You have to give them a reason to give a sh** about you, the best way to do this is by gaining experience, which internships do.

There you go, that's some free advice right there!

larryinalabama
09-07-2011, 10:02 PM
I read tomarrow

MowingMowingMowing
09-07-2011, 10:09 PM
And don't waste your $$$ on any type of "online" school, those degrees aren't worth the paper they are written on.

cuttin-to-the-Max
09-07-2011, 10:52 PM
And don't waste your $$$ on any type of "online" school, those degrees aren't worth the paper they are written on.

I took an online class and IT WAS H3LL! Online classes are more work than going in. Its double the work! Took a few business classes that way but its not for the normal joe-blo. VERY time consuming but the good thing (i guess.) Is it's self paced. But with a family and being at work 24/7 its really hard to do. The classes do tend to cost significantly less.

Just sayinngg.....Take it or leave it!

lifetree
09-07-2011, 11:15 PM
Sooo lately a lot of people ask me where do you work. I just tell i mow lawns for my self. 9/10 times I get a response like this, Mowing is not a job... its just so that you can make a little extra money. ...

Just say that you agree with them ... because mowing isn't a job, "it's an adventure" !!

Roger
09-07-2011, 11:19 PM
Some comments here about "going to school" and getting a job miss the mark of higher education. You are making some very bad assumptions regarding higher education and marketable skills.

College is not as much about "getting an education so you can get a job" as it is about learning to learn. I've not heard any of the objectors speak about life-long learning needs. You have only spoken about the cost vs. getting a job afterward. Some (many?) liberal arts colleges never intend to prepare one for a career. They intend to educate the student so that they have developed an appetite for learning and the study skills for good life-long learning. These students are much better prepared to go on for further education in law, medicine, or other professional fields.

At this point in time, young people will have four or five careers before retiring. I chuckle at the 25 year old LCO who says "I intend to mow lawns until I retire." Sorry, not going to happen! Even those with good college education will have several career paths. There is nothing mystical about this situation. The bigger question: Who will be prepared, and to be nimble enough, to make career changes?

I know some 25, and 30 year old people right now who are unemployed. Why? Because they are unable to navigate a career change only a few years out of school. They went to college with a mindset of education=>job. That is not happening, and they need to make changes. But, they were so focused on a single job that when it went away, they were high and dry, and continue to be so. They did not continue education once they left college. Again, life-long learning is key to being ready for change.

No, a higher education is not a guarantee for life-time employment. But, the opportunities afforded to the educated person are far greater than the one who has been pushing a lawn mower for 10 years, and needs to make a change. Again, I know some people, late 30s, and 40s, who never pursued higher education. They have muddled from low-paying job, to low-paying job, without much expectation of advancement.

With all that being said, there are great opportunities for those who pass through trade schools, apprentice programs, and up the ranks. These people are in demand, and have furthered themselves with learning a trade well, and have performed well on the job. But, again, it is all about learning beyond high school years. And, keeping pace required refresher course, or training in new technologies to keep pace.

Let me digress briefly on a related topic. Some threads on LS speak about those who wish to maintain their business while going to college. Exchanges happen between parties who have done it, or who are doing it. They speak about clumping classes on certain days, leaving open days for mowing, landscaping, etc. This may be necessary to make financial ends work. But, in terms of education, I consider this approach a disaster. The focus is only getting to class, getting the class work done, and passing the course. That is fine for academic purposes, but it misses a much larger point of the educational experience. Missing is the interaction with others in clubs, groups, etc. Missing is the leadership development opportunities outside the classroom. Just finishing the classroom work is adequate, but is to leave so much on the table.

When I read threads that speak about "I went for two years and did me no good," I wonder what else was being done besides the classroom. Some posts even speak about having worked through an entire Bachelors program, while keeping the business running, having bunched classes on a nearby campus to allow days to mow lawns. Shudder, shudder, shudder ... The follow up is "it did me no good, I should have just built my business larger...." Yes, one may hold a degree in hand, but hold little in the way of higher education.

OK, ... rambled enough. This is a topic that concerns me greatly. I am astounded at some of the comments in these threads about how little some people understand education. Maybe nobody has gotten this far to read it all. If you have, thank you.

GreenI.A.
09-08-2011, 01:15 AM
Some comments here about "going to school" and getting a job miss the mark of higher education. You are making some very bad assumptions regarding higher education and marketable skills.

College is not as much about "getting an education so you can get a job" as it is about learning to learn. I've not heard any of the objectors speak about life-long learning needs. You have only spoken about the cost vs. getting a job afterward. Some (many?) liberal arts colleges never intend to prepare one for a career. They intend to educate the student so that they have developed an appetite for learning and the study skills for good life-long learning. These students are much better prepared to go on for further education in law, medicine, or other professional fields.

At this point in time, young people will have four or five careers before retiring. I chuckle at the 25 year old LCO who says "I intend to mow lawns until I retire." Sorry, not going to happen! Even those with good college education will have several career paths. There is nothing mystical about this situation. The bigger question: Who will be prepared, and to be nimble enough, to make career changes?

I know some 25, and 30 year old people right now who are unemployed. Why? Because they are unable to navigate a career change only a few years out of school. They went to college with a mindset of education=>job. That is not happening, and they need to make changes. But, they were so focused on a single job that when it went away, they were high and dry, and continue to be so. They did not continue education once they left college. Again, life-long learning is key to being ready for change.

No, a higher education is not a guarantee for life-time employment. But, the opportunities afforded to the educated person are far greater than the one who has been pushing a lawn mower for 10 years, and needs to make a change. Again, I know some people, late 30s, and 40s, who never pursued higher education. They have muddled from low-paying job, to low-paying job, without much expectation of advancement.

With all that being said, there are great opportunities for those who pass through trade schools, apprentice programs, and up the ranks. These people are in demand, and have furthered themselves with learning a trade well, and have performed well on the job. But, again, it is all about learning beyond high school years. And, keeping pace required refresher course, or training in new technologies to keep pace.

Let me digress briefly on a related topic. Some threads on LS speak about those who wish to maintain their business while going to college. Exchanges happen between parties who have done it, or who are doing it. They speak about clumping classes on certain days, leaving open days for mowing, landscaping, etc. This may be necessary to make financial ends work. But, in terms of education, I consider this approach a disaster. The focus is only getting to class, getting the class work done, and passing the course. That is fine for academic purposes, but it misses a much larger point of the educational experience. Missing is the interaction with others in clubs, groups, etc. Missing is the leadership development opportunities outside the classroom. Just finishing the classroom work is adequate, but is to leave so much on the table.

When I read threads that speak about "I went for two years and did me no good," I wonder what else was being done besides the classroom. Some posts even speak about having worked through an entire Bachelors program, while keeping the business running, having bunched classes on a nearby campus to allow days to mow lawns. Shudder, shudder, shudder ... The follow up is "it did me no good, I should have just built my business larger...." Yes, one may hold a degree in hand, but hold little in the way of higher education.

OK, ... rambled enough. This is a topic that concerns me greatly. I am astounded at some of the comments in these threads about how little some people understand education. Maybe nobody has gotten this far to read it all. If you have, thank you.

I read it all!!! and I agree with most of it up until you talk about clumping the classes together. For many if you want to go to school that is the only option. I did my bachelors at night, went full time 5 classes a semester. Some semesters I even had classes on Saturdays. Most the people in my classes were career driven adults who had day jobs, we were there to learn and didn't participate in clubs or other activities as we didn't have either the time or interest. As I stated above, I'm now working on my Masters. I have 4 classes on Tuesdays and Thursday mornings. I meet my guys, get them squared away for the day and when they leave the yard at 7am, I do too, to be at my first class at 8am. I'll be there till 2pm, then Ill hit the road for work. Thursdays I have just enough time to stop by to check up on them as I have to be back on campus for a 4 pm class. But I'm fortunate enough now to have guys working for me, that allow me the opportunity to do this. I have had times where I have been in my truck on my lap top in a clients driveway typing a paper as my guys are working in the yard. You do what works. But I will say this, every day I wish I had gone to school when I was 18 like my friends did, lived in a dorm and had that whole experience. At the time, I laughed at them driving s*** boxes as thats all they could afford with their part time pay, while I was driving a new $50k suv, working a great job with great pay. It took some time but they (for the most part) caught up and past me and now I'm the one trying to catch up. Like I just said, if I could go back I would have done it completely different. Now I have to get to bed as I have to be up in 4hrs as I have work to do before my 8am class.:hammerhead:

grassman177
09-08-2011, 05:17 AM
best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I disagree. Who do you think many of those lowballers are? College grads who can't find work or those that had a good job then got laid off. You are way ahead of the game working and earning money right after high school instead of partying four years in some diploma mill, getting yourself $200K in debt then not finding work.

Don't get me started on how 50% of kids do not belong in college. If you don't have a clear goal and an excellent chance of employment upon graduation in your field when you enter a college you don't belong there.

On of the reasons this country is in the mess it's in is because of thinking like yours. We have a generation whose parents, mostly hard workers like ourselves back in the 50's, wanted a "better life" for their kids. So every kid had to have a college education and the result was they don't want to get their hands dirty, have an attitude towards those who do and feel entitled to as much money as possible.

Being in the trades or doing manual work today is considered a stigma and so our workforce is rapidly declining as we retire and our sons or daughters aren't taking our places as they once did. So we are inundated with illegals "doing the work nobody wants to do".

There's the rest of your lowballers.

good points, i am one of those that did both and i would say that is a very wise decision to make.

grassman177
09-08-2011, 05:20 AM
some really wise comments from you guys, amidst all the bs....no offense

yardguy28
09-08-2011, 07:42 AM
roger makes some good points but i don't share this view.

the view i have is that some people do well and are ment for college, degrees, learning in a class room environment and some aren't.

others do well just getting a job right after highschool or moving up in the job they had during highschool.

some enjoy hoping from job to job through out there life, others want something more permanent.

as long as your happy in life and are able to provide for yourself and if you have one a family i don't think it matters what path you take. there is no best path.

McFarland_Lawn_Care
09-08-2011, 08:02 AM
I did not go to college and kinda wish I had now. Instead I am working on a business degree while running the business at the same time - very tough at times. Lots of good advice people have given you here and I'm not going to beat a dead horse but I will say this. No matter WHAT you do in life, be sure to pic a "job" or career that makes you HAPPY. THEN educate yourself about every aspect of that job and since you enjoy it then it will be easy since you have a passion for it!!! That being said if you are not sure what you want to do for a career, then it's a good idea to get some college under your belt, even basic classes will be good. It took me about 7 years and several different jobs for me to figure out what my calling was and have been happy ever since!! Good luck bud, and congrats for working you butt off while most kids are lazy and playing games. I mowed my first lawn for money when I was 12 years old - push mower and hand scissor-like trimmer - that's right!! =D

KrayzKajun
09-08-2011, 08:46 AM
On a serious note. Too this day I wish I would have finished coillege. I'm in the process now of building my Business back up, so I can quit the police depot and go back to school and finish my Horticulture Degree.
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White Gardens
09-08-2011, 09:01 AM
I think that being 16 is your biggest draw-back.

Even if it is a business, people understand you are still going to school and doing 16 year stuff, so they don't don't perceive any 16 year old having an actual business and taking it seriously. Ultimately they don't think a 16 year old has time for a business and think it's just extra money.

When I was growing up, I worked on my farm and was making more money weekly during the busy season than most part-time teachers. Some weeks I worked 40 hours +.

It's just a misconception that a young person can't or shouldn't have an actual business.

As for low-balling Dutch, we've all been there. When starting a business you need to generate income, and sometimes you might go a bit lower on a service just to get that income in the infancy of a business.

Anyone who says they never low-balled anything is lying. I'm sure that when starting any business, there has been times where they needed any income they could get so they might have priced something a bit lower than they felt comfortable with until they could actually establish their business and price things accordingly. I know I've done it in the past, and I wouldn't be surprised if I ever have to do it again, but with what I do, if I can provide a good price for smaller services, then usually it leads to bigger work.

Once you've got the client base and steady income stream, then the clients will request you specifically if you do quality work. At that point, you can charge what you feel is fair to you, and fair to your new clients.

I'm sure you have plenty of pride in what you do Dutch, but realize you are still young, so when people make comments that rub you the wrong way, just shrug them off and use it as motivation to make your business bigger and better.

.....

yardguy28
09-08-2011, 09:29 AM
I think that being 16 is your biggest draw-back.

Even if it is a business, people understand you are still going to school and doing 16 year stuff, so they don't don't perceive any 16 year old having an actual business and taking it seriously. Ultimately they don't think a 16 year old has time for a business and think it's just extra money.

When I was growing up, I worked on my farm and was making more money weekly during the busy season than most part-time teachers. Some weeks I worked 40 hours +.

It's just a misconception that a young person can't or shouldn't have an actual business.

As for low-balling Dutch, we've all been there. When starting a business you need to generate income, and sometimes you might go a bit lower on a service just to get that income in the infancy of a business.

Anyone who says they never low-balled anything is lying. I'm sure that when starting any business, there has been times where they needed any income they could get so they might have priced something a bit lower than they felt comfortable with until they could actually establish their business and price things accordingly. I know I've done it in the past, and I wouldn't be surprised if I ever have to do it again, but with what I do, if I can provide a good price for smaller services, then usually it leads to bigger work.

Once you've got the client base and steady income stream, then the clients will request you specifically if you do quality work. At that point, you can charge what you feel is fair to you, and fair to your new clients.

I'm sure you have plenty of pride in what you do Dutch, but realize you are still young, so when people make comments that rub you the wrong way, just shrug them off and use it as motivation to make your business bigger and better.

.....

yes we've all low balled and sometimes some of us still do once in awhile.

i always keep that in mind. any income is better than none. thats why i still have clients under my "old" pricing.

when i started this business my min. was $20. i'm up to $25 as a min now but if i raise the $20's to $25 i will loose there business and since i don't have that many that are $20 and i make up for it elsewhere i'm ok with that.

i'm not suggesting you low ball all the time to get as many clients as possible but if your not really taking a hit low balling now and then. sometimes any income is better than none.

flyingdutch16
09-11-2011, 10:03 PM
As for low-balling Dutch, we've all been there.

Thanks for the reply's to every one. Really appreciate it and makes me wanna do even better.

As for low-balling i figured a lot of people do, and white that just made feel just a little bit better about it(even though its not good to low bal) Anyways I'm at a point right now that I know my expenses and charge accordingly.

Now to the whole school thing, i have been seriously considering pennt state simply because they have such a good agriculture program. And maybe do a double major in agriculture and business. Just something im considering. Will definitely think about it more ones the cold starts kicking in and business starts to slow down. (sorta can and cant wait for that)

Anyways just wanna thank you guys again! Just shows how good of a community this site has

CL&T
09-12-2011, 10:04 AM
i have been seriously considering pennt state simply because they have such a good agriculture program. And maybe do a double major in agriculture and business.

Thumbs Up

weeze
09-21-2011, 11:28 PM
don't feel bad...i'm 36 and i get the same responses....they don't think of lawncare as a full time job....they ask me well what do you do in the winter for work?...i say nothing...that's the point of it!!!...you get time off....it's like they don't get it.....you can make enough cutting the 7-8 months of the season here in the south so you don't even need to work the other 4-5 months of the year.....i dunno man...people are caught up in this whole go the school get a degree get a job working 40hrs a week with benefits thing....everyone is different but few see the advantages that lawn care can bring to your life...trust me i know how it is...i worked at an auto factory for 6 years....great pay and benefits but my life flat out sucked....i hated going to work every day...i was depressed....tired all the time...never got enough sleep....and so on and so on.......yet that was looked at by the majority as a respectable career???....it just doesn't make sense to me the way people look at things.....life is far more important than that.....now i work maybe 25-30hrs a week.....hardly ever more than 6hrs in a day...usually less....7-8 months out of the year....i'm not tired when i'm done working...my feet don't hurt at all...i'm still fresh...can go running and excercise which is better for my health...something i could never do working my other job since i was so wore out at the end of the day....i make double...yes double per hour i made at my factory job....$50 per hour instead of $25......it's easier work...much easier.....and more fun......i'm not depressed.....i mean overall i make less money than i did since i dont' work all year long but who cares...the positives from it are more than worth it to me....now to me seeing how this is...i think it's foolish to ever work for anyone ever again doing the 40-50hr per week grind....to each their own though....it's all in what you like and what type of person you are.....to me it's just freedom...when you work for someone else you have to be there no matter what and do whatever they say...when you work for yourself you call your own shots and make your life how you want it to be.

Darryl G
09-22-2011, 12:29 AM
Sooo lately a lot of people ask me where do you work. I just tell i mow lawns for my self. 9/10 times I get a response like this, Mowing is not a job... its just so that you can make a little extra money.

Now can some one please explain to me how the hell mowing is not a job?! I mean i work probably harder then them who work at a fast food restaurant or where ever they get hired. I just dont get it! Its probably just the youth of these siting on there lazy asses playing xbox all day.

Oh im 16 btw and mow 8 lawns.

Sorry guys i just had to vent about it. it was just really making me mad saying that mowing isnt a job. I mean i know its not a fully established business yet but im getting closer and closer and really do work hard to get it a fully established business.

You have to tell them that you're the owner and operator of a lawn maintenace company, not that you mow lawns!

land_scaper70
09-22-2011, 08:01 AM
Check this out. A BUSINESS IS A JOB AND A JOB CAN BECOME A BUSINESS; WITH AN EDUCATION.

CHECK OUT THIS WEB SITE, AND THE JOB PERCENTAGE OF NO HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION THROUGH A BACHELORS? YOU DO THE MATH.


http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t04.htm


NOW I MAY BE ONE SIDED SEEING THAT I A TEACHER IN A HIGH SCHOOL AND RUN A FULL TIME LANDSCAPING BUSINESS. HOWEVER, AN EDUCATION WILL OPEN MORE DOORS IN THE LONG RUN. SAVE MOST OF YOUR MONEY FOR AN EDUCATION AND SPEND SOME ON GIRLS AND CARS WAIT UNTIL YOU ARE OLD ENOUGH, THAN BEER.


best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I disagree. Who do you think many of those lowballers are? College grads who can't find work or those that had a good job then got laid off. You are way ahead of the game working and earning money right after high school instead of partying four years in some diploma mill, getting yourself $200K in debt then not finding work.

Don't get me started on how 50% of kids do not belong in college. If you don't have a clear goal and an excellent chance of employment upon graduation in your field when you enter a college you don't belong there.

On of the reasons this country is in the mess it's in is because of thinking like yours. We have a generation whose parents, mostly hard workers like ourselves back in the 50's, wanted a "better life" for their kids. So every kid had to have a college education and the result was they don't want to get their hands dirty, have an attitude towards those who do and feel entitled to as much money as possible.

Being in the trades or doing manual work today is considered a stigma and so our workforce is rapidly declining as we retire and our sons or daughters aren't taking our places as they once did. So we are inundated with illegals "doing the work nobody wants to do".

There's the rest of your lowballers.

ReddensLawnCare
09-22-2011, 08:54 AM
NOW I MAY BE ONE SIDED SEEING THAT I A TEACHER IN A HIGH SCHOOL AND RUN A FULL TIME LANDSCAPING BUSINESS. HOWEVER, AN EDUCATION WILL OPEN MORE DOORS IN THE LONG RUN. SAVE MOST OF YOUR MONEY FOR AN EDUCATION AND SPEND SOME ON GIRLS AND CARS WAIT UNTIL YOU ARE OLD ENOUGH, THAN BEER.

Teacher?:hammerhead: Must be a public school *trucewhiteflag* Just Kidding

Midtown P.E.
09-22-2011, 09:00 AM
best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Being in the trades or doing manual work today is considered a stigma and so our workforce is rapidly declining as we retire and our sons or daughters aren't taking our places as they once did. So we are inundated with illegals "doing the work nobody wants to do".

There's the rest of your lowballers.

Agreed. I'm reading a great book right now called "Shop Class As Soul Craft," which studies the decline of the skilled trades over the last 30 years in favor of the "information revolution" and sitting around a desk being a yes-man, rubber stamping someone else's "work."

With that being said, i think there is a fine line between some 'landscapers' and 'skilled tradesmen.' IMHO, a true skilled trade would be the guy in your town that's respected as the top landscape equipment mechanic. Now there is certainly a certain amount of skill and trade to landscape design, hardscapes, and even some general lawn maintenance. But just running a midsize over a yard as fast as you can, edging, then blowing, all in as little time as possible, is not much more than a commodity these days, so you can't be surprised when that type of work is subject to 'lowballers.'

CL&T
09-22-2011, 01:27 PM
CHECK OUT THIS WEB SITE, AND THE JOB PERCENTAGE OF NO HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION THROUGH A BACHELORS? YOU DO THE MATH.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t04.htm

Well unfortunately you are relying on the government to do the math and you know what that means. Unemploymment rates are a red herring. They don't reflect people who have just given up looking for a job or their enemployment has run out, people who have gone back to school because they can't find a job and the most troubling, those who are under employed- your laid off Phd working at Home Depot to put food on the table.

As a teacher you should know that high schools today do not turn out graduates that are ready for life any more. If they did those statistics would be different.

I have to laugh at the guy above who says you should study finance, accounting, or economics. That's OK if that's where your interests are. But to major in that just in the hope you will get a job- hell, I would rather blow my brains out right now than suffer through a life of misery doing something I hate even if it did make money.