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ny scaper
09-07-2011, 04:52 PM
What are all your thoughts on seafoam? I have only heard good things about it.
Specifically, does seafoam clean carbs well and without having to take them apart to clean them? I am looking to do some preventive maintenance and was just wondering how it has worked pertaining to small engine stuff, ie. weed trimmers, hedge trimmers, push mowers.

MoGreen
09-07-2011, 09:55 PM
I've been using Startron with good results. It only requires 1oz to 5 gallons too!!

jsslawncare
09-07-2011, 10:04 PM
I love it! Works great.

topsites
09-07-2011, 10:44 PM
I've always been of the opinion that when someone makes a product where they
don't list the ingredients on the label, there's something wrong with that "miracle,"
but I am amazed at the sheer number of people bamboozled by this product.

themadcutter
09-07-2011, 11:55 PM
I have soaked 10 different none working carbs in seafoam and it cleaned all of them up perfect. 6 from trimmers and 4 from small mowers.

I have never used it in my oil or in the gas tank but for soaking a carb its great.

ricky86
09-08-2011, 09:52 AM
I've always been of the opinion that when someone makes a product where they
don't list the ingredients on the label, there's something wrong with that "miracle,"
but I am amazed at the sheer number of people bamboozled by this product.

Check the MSDS. You will find an ingredient which is listed "IPA", which is the accepted abbreviation for isopropyl alcohol. It's a great solvent, as we can see from the ethanol in the fuel. But I guess it's a special kind of alcohol. One that doesn't draw the water out of rubber parts :dizzy: Bamboozled for sure.

ny scaper
09-08-2011, 10:07 AM
I have soaked 10 different none working carbs in seafoam and it cleaned all of them up perfect. 6 from trimmers and 4 from small mowers.

When you say "soaked the carb", do you mean the entire carb in one piece soaked or broken down and soaked? Thanks for the responses guys.

Sammy
09-08-2011, 03:23 PM
I have tried it twice......Did not see any improvement at all.

Just more snake oil ?

themadcutter
09-08-2011, 06:35 PM
Check the MSDS. You will find an ingredient which is listed "IPA", which is the accepted abbreviation for isopropyl alcohol. It's a great solvent, as we can see from the ethanol in the fuel. But I guess it's a special kind of alcohol. One that doesn't draw the water out of rubber parts :dizzy: Bamboozled for sure.

When you say "soaked the carb", do you mean the entire carb in one piece soaked or broken down and soaked? Thanks for the responses guys.

I have tried it twice......Did not see any improvement at all.

Just more snake oil ?



ny scaper : As far as small lawn mower carbs it was just the bowl and float that was removed. 2 stroke carbs were had the top and bottom taken off. One of the 2 stoke carbs did go in almost whole with the screws loosened a little and was soaked over night. That one worked out fine also.

Sammy: when you say you tried it twice. How did you try it?

ricky86: I have left rubber parts in it and they have not dissolved or even softened. There is water in rubber?

ricky86
09-08-2011, 08:56 PM
ny scaper : As far as small lawn mower carbs it was just the bowl and float that was removed. 2 stroke carbs were had the top and bottom taken off. One of the 2 stoke carbs did go in almost whole with the screws loosened a little and was soaked over night. That one worked out fine also.

Sammy: when you say you tried it twice. How did you try it?

ricky86: I have left rubber parts in it and they have not dissolved or even softened. There is water in rubber?

Perhaps water was the wrong term, as was rubber. Alcohol has a tendency to draw the moisture (which I'm sure is part water) out of elastomers. You like it? Good, use it.

themadcutter
09-08-2011, 09:35 PM
Perhaps water was the wrong term, as was rubber. Alcohol has a tendency to draw the moisture (which I'm sure is part water) out of elastomers. You like it? Good, use it.

I am only assuming the small black rubbery pieces were actually rubber. the important thing to me is that it didn't hurt anything.

but like you said. If you don't like it then don't use it.

ny scaper
09-09-2011, 10:13 AM
Thanks for the info Madcutter

themadcutter
09-09-2011, 08:11 PM
Thanks for the info Madcutter

I have a little more info to add. it has not seemed to effect gaskets. the large rubber like gasket that seals the bowl on a bowl type carb seem un effected after a few hours of soaking. I am actually going to put a primer bulb in a can of sea foam tonight and see what it looks like in the morning because I am curious. I'll let you know what happens.

AlohaMowing
09-09-2011, 08:27 PM
I credit Sea Foam with saving the carburetor on a generator. It had sat with gas in it for about a year. Wouldn't start. Put in fresh gas with some Sea Foam. Drained the carburetor bowl and ran some of the treated gas in. It wouldn't start. The next day it did start and ran weak, but after 15 or 20 minutes it was running as strong as ever.

themadcutter
09-10-2011, 10:43 AM
I soaked 4 items in seafoam for over 14 hours.

from left to right.

some foam rubber, a primer bulb, fuel pump diaphragm and fuel pump gasket.

None of it seemed to change in texture, flexibility, color or in any other way.

I found the foam rubber the most interesting because I wanted to see if I could use this foam for air filter material and I soaked it in some gas/oil mix. It immediately started to swell and puff up, It dried ok and didn't fall apart from the gas but when I put it in the sea foam it didn't swell up at all.

Notice that the flaps on the diaphragm are not turning up and curling. This item is very thin and I would think it would react pretty fast if it was going to.

If I had done this test before using seafoam to soak carbs in I would have thought seafoam couldn't clean anything because it wasn't harsh enough. But Seeing I used it on over 10 carbs now, I know it cleans very well.

Right now I have an old carb. from a 17hp engine soaking. it was so varnished that the choke wouldn't move. looked like someone put a glob of amber glue on the choke. It is soaking, gaskets and all, with no bowl.

I'll let you know how it turns out.

nepatsfan
09-13-2011, 10:35 PM
subscribing. I want to see how this turns out.

themadcutter
09-13-2011, 10:56 PM
subscribing. I want to see how this turns out.


I am very sorry.

I forgot I said that I was going to tell everyone how it worked out with that old (super crusty) carb I stepped on the float and broke it so I just used the carb off the blown (or thought was blown) engine I was replacing and I never finished letting the carb soak. it wasn't in for more than a couple before I took it back out and scraped it.

I do have more info I am going to put in this thread on the next post and I do have a john deere 22" self propelled I need to work on and hope to soak the carb soon. This time I will remember to finish and post the results.

nepatsfan
09-13-2011, 11:00 PM
Hey no problem man. I was just wondering what the results would be. I use seafoam quite a bit but its more what I dont notice than what I do. I havent had any carb issues in a while...which I think is because of the periodic shot of seafoam in the gas. I always run a machine with a little seafoam before i put it away for an extended period of time. Seems to work well for us but no solid evidence.

themadcutter
09-13-2011, 11:10 PM
One thing I did do with the seafoam is put it in the crank case to see if it would improve the valve condition.

The 17hp motor I was using ran but ran a little rough. It had been sitting since 2008. When it started it was belching rust from the muffler a few times and then ran pretty good but a little rough.

I poured some used seafoam (Used to soak around 10 different carbs in) right into the oil fill. It was about 1 and 1/2 cups. I have no idea what the proper amount is to use so I just poured it in. The engine started, ran and warmed up. When it got hot it started belching. I mean bad. If you have ever seen operation petticoat (a world war II movie about a submarine) then you know what it looked like.

I kept thinking the motor was going to stall but it never did. It happened about every 10 to 15 seconds. after the 12th time I just let it run in neutral and waited inside. It was a scene man. the smoke was un real! I don't really know how long it went on but the belches got smaller and smaller and then stopped.

No more popping and grumbling. the motor ran very smooth. It was a definite improvement. completely inconclusive seeing I never visually inspected the valves before and after and it could have been the action of the motor going up and down in rpms or just that it finally got to run instead of just sitting that got the valves cleaned but for now I am crediting sea foam.

dboyd351
09-27-2011, 09:01 PM
I've got a 93 Chevy pickup with over 200,000 miles on it. Every so often it starts running rough. I add an ounce or so of Seafoam to the gas and it clears up every time.

dboyd351
09-27-2011, 09:03 PM
Sorry, I didn't preview my post: I add an ounce or so of seafoam PER GALLON of gas and it clears right up!

Patriot Services
09-27-2011, 09:09 PM
Seafoam does work great. A few posters need to read up on the huge difference between Isopropyl and Ethanol alcohols. IA has been used for decades in gas engines. Usually marketed as dry gas up north and used to draw the water condensate out of gasoline. Never affected carbs or fuel pumps all those years that had many rubber and plastic parts including floats. Some of you older guys may even remeber how Marvel Mystery Oil would smooth out many a worn engine.
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Charles
09-27-2011, 09:17 PM
I put Seafoam in my diesel truck fuel tank and saw great improvement with just one can.
I use Star Tron in all my lawn equipment. Seafoam just didn't do the job for me in that department. Just 1/4 oz in every 5 gallons. Probably just needed to put Seafoam straight into the Carb and let it soak over night. Star tron is like jet fuel. I was having problem with the mower acting fuel starved and the weedeaters and blowers running rough when they were hot. Star Tron cleared that up

Patriot Services
09-27-2011, 09:34 PM
My two stroke mix is getting to be a science experiment. 93 octant. Amsoil Sabre, Ethanol Shield and Seafoam. So far nor failures, hard starts or carbon issues.
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dboyd351
09-27-2011, 10:00 PM
Patriot Services,
According to Puregas.org there is a station in Tampa that sells ethanol free gas:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&q=6211+N.+Dale+Mabry,+Tampa,+FL

Just in case you want to go back to gas w/o ethanol.

Patriot Services
09-27-2011, 10:07 PM
I drive by there 3 days a week. Never knew it was ethanol free. The only other place I could find was a marina down in Port Tampa.
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ed2hess
09-27-2011, 10:33 PM
My two stroke mix is getting to be a science experiment. 93 octant. Amsoil Sabre, Ethanol Shield and Seafoam. So far nor failures, hard starts or carbon issues.
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Might want to take a look at red armour 2 stroke oil from shindawa it covers all your concerns and you can run lower octane. But if cost is no issue then you probably wouldn';t want to change.

dboyd351
09-28-2011, 03:45 PM
I drive by there 3 days a week. Never knew it was ethanol free. The only other place I could find was a marina down in Port Tampa.
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Most of the pumps at that station are probably not ethanol free, if it is like around here. But if they are listed on that site they should have at least one pump that is non ethanol gas. Usually costs about 40 cents a gallon more, but to me it is worth it to avoid ethanol issues.