PDA

View Full Version : Trimming Around Wooden Fence Posts?


mcambrose
11-03-2002, 09:11 AM
Does anyone have any special tips for trimming around the square wooden fence posts on wooden fences. If I use the weedeater, the string will get the grass good on one side of the pole, but not the other because of the direction the trimmer is spinning. The problem is the right angle made between the fence post and the fence. I also have problems with string damaging the fence post.

Brickman
11-03-2002, 09:42 AM
A little round up around the post takes care of the problem.
As for the damage, ya got to be real careful, with time you can trim and barely touch the wood and still cut the grass. I have seen posts that were almost cut in half by careless trimmers. :dizzy:

mcambrose
11-03-2002, 06:16 PM
I would love to use roundup, but customers wouldn't accept it. I just end up hand pulling it.

Bob Minney
11-04-2002, 12:53 PM
If you have trouble hitting posts remove 1-2" of grass around post. Better solution is 1-2' mulch or rock border along fence.
If you can't do above get galvanized metal U brackets from framing section at lumber yard/Home depot/etc.. Don't know what they are called but they won't show too much and aren't too $. Put them on bottom of post to prevent damage.

Gravely_Man
11-04-2002, 01:00 PM
Using a trimmer is an art form. Some people have it and others don't. I am one of the people that can't master this piece of equipment. I have worked with people that could do what you are asking without a problem. I on the other hand would get close with the trimmer and then use hand shears to finish. Not productive for me in the least but I know my limitations. Best of luck.


Gravely_Man

Runner
11-04-2002, 02:05 PM
Originally posted by mcambrose
If I use the weedeater, the string will get the grass good on one side of the pole, but not the other because of the direction the trimmer is spinning. The problem is the right angle made between the fence post and the fence. I also have problems with string damaging the fence post.

Do you have a straight shaft trimmer that the head spins counterclockwise? (throwing things to the left) If so, are you trimming from right to left on each side of the post? (moving clockwise around each post or object) Also, when you start on a new side, have some decent rpms already up so the the string is already cutting decent when it touches the first grass. This gives you a more accurate, precise blade edge - and knowing where it is.

geogunn
11-04-2002, 03:26 PM
trimming around a post shouldn't be a problem. I have trimmed around thousands with no complaints.

the trick is trimming around young trees where the grass grows up against the bark. you gotta trim the grass and not cut the bark because if you trim a ring through the bark, the tree dies!

I have seen lots of young dead trees due to this avoidable damage. many of the guys working around here are clueless and careless about this fact.:(

GEO

John Gamba
11-04-2002, 04:15 PM
WHAT BOB MINNEY SAID BIG TIME:D

WLC
11-04-2002, 07:43 PM
If your customers won't accept the Round-Up method, you might go with a PGR to slow the growth around the fence posts.......and wherever else your having difficulty trimming.:D


John

SLS
11-04-2002, 08:16 PM
Sneak up on the offending fence posts in the middle of the night...and remove them. ;)

I have a strong dislike for wooden post fences...especially the 'split-rail' variety. :D

TJLC
11-04-2002, 08:25 PM
I too have the same problem trimming around wood objects(trees, mailbox posts, wood fence posts etc.) I use a little weed killer and I mean just enough to achieve the desired "ring". I have not had any complaints yet. I know as so as I say that, someone will complain. LOL The other suggestions are very good also. Good luck.

greenman
11-04-2002, 08:46 PM
Originally posted by geogunn
trimming around a post shouldn't be a problem. I have trimmed around thousands with no complaints.



GEO

He is talking about the square posts that support a privacy fence,I think. Only one side of the post is open. The othere two sides are difficult to trim because theres always that clump in the corner(s) that is hard to reach.

Turn the trimmer at a 90 degrees as if you were edging with it to get the corners. Just be careful not to cut into the turf and scalp.

lsylvain
11-06-2002, 06:42 PM
the tricks to trimming anything and making it look good are

1. Once you start up your trimmer and are ready to go, open it up full throttle and don't let off until you are done trimming. I see guys all the time trimming at half throttle or reving the trimmer as they go.

2. Take the guard off, with the guard off you have more control over what you are trimming. You can trim using all 360 of string, instead of 180 or less with the guard.

Saftey! you say..

The only thing that that guard does is "keep things from hitting you" It doesn't keep things from flying out the front and hitting the people that will sue you. Once you get the hang of it you will know exactly where debris is going to be heading. I don't even where pants anymore.

sorry for the ranting but I figured people would bring up the saftey thing

Doogiegh
11-06-2002, 09:11 PM
Do any of you guys walk around a yard a spot-dab a shot here and there of Round-up Pro in the spring so that as you continue to do the maintenance of the yard all spring, summer and fall, you would have very little "difficult" trimming to do?

If you do do this, do you bill the customer for a "$5.00 Application fee" for the pint or quart of solution you used, or do you just let it go, knowing that you'll make that up in time by simply not HAVING to trim along some stupid split-rail wooden fence every single cut all season long...

I really like that idea of carefully working a yard in the spring or as needed so that the trimming time is nearly minimal (around mailboxes, telephone poles, fire hydrants, etc etc..)

Thanks,
Gary

dr grass
11-07-2002, 09:18 AM
runner has it down. listen to him! hes been cutting grass since i was at the roller rink with my mom barley out of dipers!! haha. Seriously though, i would try very assertatively to convince my clients to let you apply round up. take some photos of a hacked up post, and explain to them with a small amount of round up, this can be avoided alltogether. It will make for a neater appearence, and make your job easier and more time efficent.




shep ;)

jokatico
11-07-2002, 10:28 AM
What do you tell the customer about the damaged post?
Do you tell them the damage was there from the last person?
If it is your fault, do you offer to repair it?

mcambrose
11-09-2002, 09:22 PM
Originally posted by greenman
He is talking about the square posts that support a privacy fence,I think. Only one side of the post is open. The othere two sides are difficult to trim because theres always that clump in the corner(s) that is hard to reach.

Turn the trimmer at a 90 degrees as if you were edging with it to get the corners. Just be careful not to cut into the turf and scalp.

I tried your suggestion today and it worked great. Thanks for the response.

greenman
11-09-2002, 10:50 PM
Originally posted by mcambrose
I tried your suggestion today and it worked great. Thanks for the response.

Im so glad I could help someone out. So many people have helped me out on this forum, it always feels good to return the favor.