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Tomwilllight
09-09-2011, 01:48 PM
I'm growing tired of the use of the term "portrait" to describe what we create. A "portrait" is hung on a wall and static. A "portrait" does not move... it does not change... and it is commonly accepted as referring to a representation of a PERSON.

If we are ever going to be accepted as the artists the best of us are, we need to understand the importance of the meanings of the words we use to describe our work.

BELOW IS THE WIKIPEDIA DEFINITION OF A PORTRAIT. Read is and think about it.

Portrait is a painting, photograph, sculpture, or other artistic representation of a person, in which the face and its expression is predominant. The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the person. For this reason, in photography a portrait is generally not a snapshot, but a composed image of a person in a still position. A portrait often shows a person looking directly at the painter or photographer, in order to most successfully engage the subject with the viewer.

Does this in any way describe what we do?

Tom

J Larson
09-09-2011, 01:59 PM
I prefer to call it "living art"...
J

Tomwilllight
09-09-2011, 02:14 PM
Jaret,

That's a really good start!

Are there other ways to describe what we do in a meaningful/ Tweetie kind of way?

Tom

steveparrott
09-09-2011, 03:13 PM
Tom, I agree, portrait is not a good word for us. Even "painting with light" doesn't do the work justice. Painting is a one-time event - it doesn't convey the constantly changing play of light and shadow in the evolving landscape.

The lighting designer injects light sources into a landscape. This starts a process of luminous creation that changes every evening, that brings ever-new visual experiences. Truly remarkable - a creative process of renewal, rediscovery, and evolving relationship.

Hard to put words to what landscape lighting designers do. Maybe, "Creating living works of light".

Tomwilllight
09-09-2011, 03:16 PM
Steve,

I like "Creating living works of light" too!

Are there more ways to describe what we do out there?

Tom

44DCNF
09-09-2011, 04:05 PM
Creating an Illumination seems fitting. I read from that, more than something simply lit up. Rather something with a majestic presence to it.

Yeah? No?

Lite4
09-09-2011, 05:08 PM
Lighting scene, visual ambiance, dramatic evening presentation, curb appeal, neighbor envy, eye candy..... I am quickly digressing
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Alan B
09-09-2011, 06:10 PM
I have always thought great lighting creates an a great atmosphere. Each situation may warrant a different atmosphere, but in the end a great designer not only matches the lighting to the need, but in the end creates an atmosphere and mood that enhances the property.

Tomwilllight
09-09-2011, 07:04 PM
Alan, that's a good summary of design intention. Perhaps you'd consider adding something about the client in your statement.

This is fun... Any more good ideas out there?

Tom

starry night
09-09-2011, 08:55 PM
"Composition" i.e. the harmonious arrangement of the parts of a work of art in relation to each other and the whole.

So how about a "lighting composition" or a "lighted composition" ?

44DCNF
09-09-2011, 09:20 PM
Portrait is so last century. What you masters do is add another dimension, draw the eye to the important features, and as said, it is an ever evolving situation. Forgive me for interjecting here, not being of your profession, but I admire your work enough to want to contribute.....

Evolving Palatial Illuminations? (Just a mixture of some of the concepts already mentioned) It's much like sunsets and sunrises, cloud formations and rainbows, each one being different, even from moment to moment, and each one beautiful in it's own right.

Ok, I'll bug on out of here now and leave you pros to your own creating.

NightScenes
09-10-2011, 01:52 PM
Tom, I like "Refining the Night" but that's my trade marked slogan!

Tomwilllight
09-10-2011, 04:24 PM
Simple is good.

More ideas?

Tom

The Lighting Geek
09-10-2011, 10:43 PM
I believe that I create ambiance or an atmosphere, an emotional connection to their space. When I get it right, it is a very emotional experience for my client, and me too. It goes beyond painting or a portrait, it is what sets me apart.

steveparrott
09-11-2011, 12:44 PM
Tommy, I love "Battling the forces of darkness..." (Wonder where I heard that?:) )

This statement addresses a very powerful role of lighting - not mere illumination in the physical sense, but also illumination in the emotional and spiritual realms.

Darkness can be frightening, depressing, threatening, isolating, lonely. Definitions of dark include: hidden, obscure, gloomy, hopeless, dismal, and ignorant.

Light on the other hand is equated with knowledge, revelation, inspiration, recognition, upliftment, and unburdening.

I think this is why homeowners are speechless and emotional upon seeing their properties expertly illuminated. It is like we have battled the forces of darkness on their property. Our work has uplifted and unburdened them.

Maybe instead of certifcation, we should go for ordination, or at least knighthood.

Tomwilllight
09-15-2011, 03:26 PM
There is no doubt that lighting the landscape produces deep emotional responses for both the practitioner and client. I experience a kind of a bubbling high while I'm focusing and a calm... almost serene... relief when I view and move through my completed projects. Several clients have mentioned the "lift" they get when viewing and walking through my installations.

I feel privileged to have the opportunity to design for our dominant sense. Sight offers us immediate and lasting impressions of the environment inhabit. Our eyes, directly connected to our brain, deliver masses of information of which we are largely unaware, yet is continuously modifying and defining our perception of self, others and where we are in space.

And let's not forget our need for darkness... for what it hides and makes mysterious. It provides a frame for our designs and offers promises of discovery.

Tom

emby
09-16-2011, 03:35 PM
There is no doubt that lighting the landscape produces deep emotional responses for both the practitioner and client. I experience a kind of a bubbling high while I'm focusing and a calm... almost serene... relief when I view and move through my completed projects. Several clients have mentioned the "lift" they get when viewing and walking through my installations.

I feel privileged to have the opportunity to design for our dominant sense. Sight offers us immediate and lasting impressions of the environment inhabit. Our eyes, directly connected to our brain, deliver masses of information of which we are largely unaware, yet is continuously modifying and defining our perception of self, others and where we are in space.

And let's not forget our need for darkness... for what it hides and makes mysterious. It provides a frame for our designs and offers promises of discovery.

Tom

Tom,

PERFECT in every way !!!