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View Full Version : irrigation for indoor riding arena horses ????


Mdirrigation
09-13-2011, 05:04 PM
just got a call from a customer about indoor irrigation , suspended from the ceiling of an indoor horse riding arena , She says its a type of mist system . Anybody have any experience with something like this?

DanaMac
09-13-2011, 05:10 PM
I believe there have been a couple threads in the past about this. You might try a quick search.

Sprinkus
09-13-2011, 05:40 PM
What's it watering? Grass? Shrubs? Horses?
Is it to keep the dust down on the track?

FIMCO-MEISTER
09-13-2011, 05:58 PM
When I get back home in about 3 weeks I'll post some pics of the one my sister has.

AI Inc
09-13-2011, 06:50 PM
Ive seen em before but never did one. Closest thing to it Ive done was a clay tennis court.

greenmonster304
09-13-2011, 08:23 PM
I never used this but researched it for a potential job. http://www.netafimusa.com/files/applications/landscape/case-studies/solutions-by-netafim-horse-arena.pdf
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Mdirrigation
09-13-2011, 09:27 PM
I called netafim they gave me some info . The purpose is to keep the dust down . May be an intresting job , never installed a system without using a shovel . Probably will need a jlg lift .

greenmonster304
09-13-2011, 09:38 PM
You will probably have to address winter use freeze issues.
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Mdirrigation
09-13-2011, 10:38 PM
Thats what i was concerned about , I was thinking auto drains at low points and on either side of the valves , and using a master valve . And or having a air compressor attached to the system so they could blow it down themselves each night when necessary .

Mike Leary
09-13-2011, 10:51 PM
Thats what i was concerned about , I was thinking auto drains at low points and on either side of the valves , and using a master valve . And or having a air compressor attached to the system so they could blow it down themselves each night when necessary .

Auto drains are a waste of water, seems like they make hangers with low-drain check valves. I've done a few consultations for dust control and figured rotors on the back side of the posts. But for cooling, LDC misters would be the answer.

DanaMac
09-13-2011, 10:55 PM
How about collecting the water from the auto drains to a water bucket or trough? Or barrels with flowers underneath them?

A small air compressor to hook to it would be good as well, but operator error comes into play. Or operator forgetfullness.

agrostis
09-13-2011, 10:56 PM
People will spend big bucks when it comes to horses. A indoor irrigation system to keep dust down is small time. You could get some good referrals from this.

Mdirrigation
09-14-2011, 09:25 PM
The owner has money but knows his $hit. he is a contractor self made millionare , still runs his equipment , drives the trucks , and even since the slowdown in the economy , hasnt layed anyone off .

I like the bucket idea for the auto drains , operating the compressor wouldnt be a problem for him .

Wet_Boots
09-14-2011, 09:40 PM
If you sized things properly, you could install a compressor in the system, and blow out the lines after every watering cycle, by way of another program.

BrandonV
09-14-2011, 10:37 PM
Just like a greenhouse, it'll wet the dirt down to keep dust away.
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FIMCO-MEISTER
09-14-2011, 11:10 PM
If you can hang in there my sister has a beauty hangng from her arena rafters. They drain without blowouts because they are upside down Sprinklers.
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Sprinkus
09-15-2011, 09:18 AM
They drain without blowouts because they are upside down Sprinklers.


We did something like that many years ago at a nursery. Basically an irrigation system hung from the beams with the sprinkler heads pointing down.
Needless to say that servicing the system was not an enjoyable experience.

BrandonV
09-15-2011, 10:59 PM
We did something like that many years ago at a nursery. Basically an irrigation system hung from the beams with the sprinkler heads pointing down.
Needless to say that servicing the system was not an enjoyable experience.

We have 23 overwintering structures set up this way, no freze problems as long as you dont let the pipes sag. Also a drain at the low point whhee it goes into the ground is a must, our main pipes are above ground al-lu-mini-um (british proncuation) though.

GreenI.A.
09-16-2011, 03:10 PM
I'm just thinking, if you do hang them upside down as others are saying then you wont need to worry about the having to pup up. So you can just remove the spring and if hung upside down they will stay popped open alowing any water inside to drain out of the heads automatically

DanaMac
09-16-2011, 03:16 PM
I'm just thinking, if you do hang them upside down as others are saying then you wont need to worry about the having to pup up. So you can just remove the spring and if hung upside down they will stay popped open alowing any water inside to drain out of the heads automatically

Or instead, no pop up head, and a riser with a shrub adapter and nozzle.

eludemann
09-16-2011, 10:07 PM
Mist heads don't have a very good pattern upside down. We have used nelson s10 spinners, but they do get water on the ceiling.

Wet_Boots
09-16-2011, 10:17 PM
There are brass impacts designed for upside-down operation, but I think they are all full-circles