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Smallaxe
09-26-2011, 08:30 PM
I could only think of 3 reasons for aeration(plugging) and ridiculed every other idea for it, especially seedbed...

But I read a post on Lawnsite and decided that since I had the aerator in my hands, that I would beat up this piece of ground until... I hurt...

Well that single post made me think about something, that I'd never thot about b4...

When one is confronted with a tough area in which, compaction, puddling and shade come together, to prohibit any kind of grass to grow... What do you do???

The answer is: Use the aerator like a tiller and loosen the soil to the point of soil viability , then level and overseed...

Turns out to be a pretty decent seedbed after all... :)

Who else has had any luck with chronic problem areas like this ?? And: Has it worked for you???

Miles4767
09-26-2011, 08:51 PM
funny you say that. have a customer who has an area in his lawn that is shade and the soil is like concrete. i aerated the crap out of it and had it raked so it was level and seeded. came up very well. problem is that in the spring the grass comes up great, but once the trees bloom and its all shaded the grass thins out.. so we do the same in the fall. also, the customer doesnt water and wont agree with me when i explain the whole you need sun to help the grass and the spot that is shaded almost year round will never have thick turf. but besides that, what you said is what will work

grassman177
09-26-2011, 09:23 PM
i do it all the time. beats the alternative of a tiller

fl-landscapes
09-26-2011, 10:10 PM
Sounds like an area suited for rotodairon (toro soil cultivator) work. Not that several passes of an aerator wouldn't accomplish nearly the same thing, the rotodairon was built for exactly this type of situation.
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Darryl G
09-26-2011, 11:56 PM
Glad you came around... I remember that post :)

Smallaxe
09-27-2011, 08:25 AM
Still don't do single passes for seedbed... if I'm not aerating and a patch needs doing I'll still just use a mantis or a weasel for the patches as opposed to getting an aerator...

Miles, I've been doing some poa supina in the shade and so far so good, but the seed is expensive so watering will be a little more important...

jfoxtrot9
09-28-2011, 04:25 PM
I could only think of 3 reasons for aeration(plugging) and ridiculed every other idea for it, especially seedbed...

But I read a post on Lawnsite and decided that since I had the aerator in my hands, that I would beat up this piece of ground until... I hurt...

Well that single post made me think about something, that I'd never thot about b4...

When one is confronted with a tough area in which, compaction, puddling and shade come together, to prohibit any kind of grass to grow... What do you do???

The answer is: Use the aerator like a tiller and loosen the soil to the point of soil viability , then level and overseed...

Turns out to be a pretty decent seedbed after all... :)

Who else has had any luck with chronic problem areas like this ?? And: Has it worked for you???

Do it frequently. Major advantage if the aerator is hydro to move back and forth quickly.

Smallaxe
09-28-2011, 08:10 PM
Do it frequently. Major advantage if the aerator is hydro to move back and forth quickly.

What you are saying is foriegn to me... Plz, clarify... :)

americanlawn
09-28-2011, 08:46 PM
Ditto buddy - short of using a rototiller, the new hydro-drive aerators really cut the mustard. Go forward & reverse as many times as you want (especially for bad areas), and the seed bed is very well prepared. Slit seeding/drill seeding merely places seed in an already bad environment >> good luck with that.

Had folks stop by in recent months to demo our LS & XT5 walk behind hydro aerators. To the best of my knowledge, all ended up ordering the XT5. Paul from Muscatine was here today. (thanks buddy) :waving:

i do it all the time. beats the alternative of a tiller

fl-landscapes
09-28-2011, 08:54 PM
Ditto buddy - short of using a rototiller, the new hydro-drive aerators really cut the mustard. Go forward & reverse as many times as you want (especially for bad areas), and the seed bed is very well prepared. Slit seeding/drill seeding merely places seed in an already bad environment >> good luck with that.

Had folks stop by in recent months to demo our LS & XT5 walk behind hydro aerators. To the best of my knowledge, all ended up ordering the XT5. Paul from Muscatine was here today. (thanks buddy) :waving:

I have a rotodairon and use it in these types of situations. But I also use my slit seeder to seed. Saying slit seeding only puts seed in a bad environment may be correct unless you address those problems which could be many things other than compaction. I'm just saying aerating the bad environment and seeding isn't going to help you either if the problem is anything but compaction.
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Smallaxe
09-28-2011, 08:59 PM
Ditto buddy - short of using a rototiller, the new hydro-drive aerators really cut the mustard. Go forward & reverse as many times as you want (especially for bad areas), and the seed bed is very well prepared. Slit seeding/drill seeding merely places seed in an already bad environment >> good luck with that.

Had folks stop by in recent months to demo our LS & XT5 walk behind hydro aerators. To the best of my knowledge, all ended up ordering the XT5. Paul from Muscatine was here today. (thanks buddy) :waving:

OK, so we have a sales pitch that makes it worth my while to get an aerator that has - hydro power- to and fro so that I can aerate a patch job instead of tilling a patch job...

See... I'm Old School, where Patch Job means Patch Job... Save the "Salespitch" for the Suckers... Thank you... :)

bigslick7878
09-29-2011, 03:40 PM
I could only think of 3 reasons for aeration(plugging) and ridiculed every other idea for it, especially seedbed...

But I read a post on Lawnsite and decided that since I had the aerator in my hands, that I would beat up this piece of ground until... I hurt...

Well that single post made me think about something, that I'd never thot about b4...

When one is confronted with a tough area in which, compaction, puddling and shade come together, to prohibit any kind of grass to grow... What do you do???

The answer is: Use the aerator like a tiller and loosen the soil to the point of soil viability , then level and overseed...

Turns out to be a pretty decent seedbed after all... :)

Who else has had any luck with chronic problem areas like this ?? And: Has it worked for you???

Glad you finally came around, I didn't think it was going to happen.

The benefits are many.

americanlawn
09-29-2011, 08:52 PM
No sales pitch here bud. Are you trying to piss me off?

I have questions:

1) Are hydro aerators really that bad? (cuz most guys on this site do not think so)
2) "worth my while to get an aerator that has hydro-power".....have you ever tried one? (sure doesn't sound like it) BTW the term "hydro" is in regard to the transmission - not "power, horsepower, etc".
3) "patch job"............wtf. Are you suggesting total renovations of lawns?
4) "old school" -- Bud.... I've been in this business for over 30 years, yet I am ALWAYS willing to try new (improved) technology.
5) Have you put serious hours on a LS, Plugr, Z-Plug, or TURFCO hydrostatic aerator? I'm guessing not -- due to your "teen chat room-type" post.
6) Regarding "hydro aerators + sales pitch for suckers". Holy crap, we have never recommended one brand over another. Instead, we test all models for a decent amount of time so we can judge for ourselves as to which equipment works best for us. (it's a fair bet you have never done that either). Bud -- we don't buy crap equipment. Before we spend the money, we "demo" all possible options to see what's best. I don't care if it's at the Iowa State University test trials, traveling to Indiana, Ohio, Minnesota, etc ---
Ever taken the time to visit the manufacturing headquarters of equipment companies so you can demo first-hand what they offer? We have, and I'm guessing you have not. :hammerhead:

Now who is the "patch job sucker" :confused: :laugh:

BTW -- you're welcome. :cool2:

OK, so we have a sales pitch that makes it worth my while to get an aerator that has - hydro power- to and fro so that I can aerate a patch job instead of tilling a patch job...

See... I'm Old School, where Patch Job means Patch Job... Save the "Salespitch" for the Suckers... Thank you... :)

Smallaxe
09-30-2011, 06:59 AM
No sales pitch here bud. Are you trying to piss me off?

I have questions:

1) Are hydro aerators really that bad? (cuz most guys on this site do not think so)
2) "worth my while to get an aerator that has hydro-power".....have you ever tried one? (sure doesn't sound like it) BTW the term "hydro" is in regard to the transmission - not "power, horsepower, etc".
3) "patch job"............wtf. Are you suggesting total renovations of lawns?
4) "old school" -- Bud.... I've been in this business for over 30 years, yet I am ALWAYS willing to try new (improved) technology.
5) Have you put serious hours on a LS, Plugr, Z-Plug, or TURFCO hydrostatic aerator? I'm guessing not -- due to your "teen chat room-type" post.
6) Regarding "hydro aerators + sales pitch for suckers". Holy crap, we have never recommended one brand over another. Instead, we test all models for a decent amount of time so we can judge for ourselves as to which equipment works best for us. (it's a fair bet you have never done that either). Bud -- we don't buy crap equipment. Before we spend the money, we "demo" all possible options to see what's best. I don't care if it's at the Iowa State University test trials, traveling to Indiana, Ohio, Minnesota, etc ---
Ever taken the time to visit the manufacturing headquarters of equipment companies so you can demo first-hand what they offer? We have, and I'm guessing you have not. :hammerhead:

Now who is the "patch job sucker" :confused: :laugh:

BTW -- you're welcome. :cool2:

Wow, I think that aerators are fine... I just made that point in my thread here... But what my last thought was about was... "Patchwork"... If a whole lawn 'needs' to be aerated then multiple passes over a "patch" is helpful as a seedbed...

If I have 3 patches, less than the size of a kitchen table on a lawn that doesn't need to be aerated...

Your question is: "Which aerator should I use?"

the right question is: "Which procedure best meets the needs of this small patchwork repair?"

Do you see the irrelevance of that aerator point, in patchwork? Did you notice that I wasn't sure why a "Hydro-***" was a handier tool for patchwork? and that, that was the subject of my question? Think for a second: Is an aerator handy for patchwork?