PDA

View Full Version : life after lawncare


MADEMAN
10-19-2011, 12:48 AM
what are u guy are plannin on doin after u retired ur weedeaters and lawnmower???the golden years may seem long away but sooner are later its goin 2 cum...*trucewhiteflag*

calvinslawnservices
10-19-2011, 08:11 AM
I'm assuming he is talking about retirement. Its a long way off for me as I am 20. I plan on being on a beach with a 20 something bringing me drinks all day. Haha.

RussellB
10-19-2011, 08:26 AM
Retirement is sweet but if you are not independently wealthy where you can travel etc, golf, fishing and whatever else your hobbies are will get old quick. I retired at 47 years old, financially stable and quickly found out that retirement will make you fat and lazy. That is why I purchased a lawn service business three years ago. I recommend you save as much money as you can towards the day that you can switch careers. Unless you want to become what I am sure some of your clients are....lonely and grumpy!
Posted via Mobile Device

Snyder's Lawn Inc
10-19-2011, 08:47 AM
Door Greeter at Wal Mart LOL
Probly do this till Im in the ground

32vld
10-19-2011, 07:02 PM
Steve Jobs worked at apple till the day before he died.

Nothing wrong with working till the end. Better to keep active with a reason to get out of bed each day.

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
10-19-2011, 07:53 PM
Great question and I can honestly say I am not sure. Gave me something else to ponder!
Posted via Mobile Device

GMLC
10-19-2011, 08:58 PM
Fish, BBQ and enjoy.

gene gls
10-19-2011, 09:08 PM
I am at that point, 69.........and the shine from the "golden" years is not that bright any more. The 401K was looking real good several years ago untill Enron went down the tubes and the stock market followed. Sold the business 2 years ago and now work 20 or so hours a week for a New York couple that have a "summer" property up on the hill. Of course I still got the family free bees to take care of. As was said in another post, you can get fat and lazy very easy sitting around which is no good for the body.

Keith
10-19-2011, 09:13 PM
I didn't know you sold your business, gene. The 20 hour week job sounds like a good gig though.

larryinalabama
10-19-2011, 09:14 PM
Dont ever retire until you expire

David Haggerty
10-20-2011, 06:32 AM
Yup, like the other posts, I'll just keep on keeping on. I'm 65.

I really like what I'm doing. Mowing all summer, Florida all winter.

I can't really afford to do it. I just do it anyway. I bought a camper I couldn't afford and pull it with a truck I didn't need. The payments extend into my 70's.

I refuse to live my life waiting for someday.

Here's pics of what I do all winter;

http://s243.photobucket.com/home/thecampingman/index

MADEMAN
10-20-2011, 07:40 AM
u guys are right keep rollin till the wheels fall off..lol...ill just build wealth 4 fun hell dat sounds like a good hobbie 2 have instead of just getin old and lazy...thanks guys

yardguy28
10-20-2011, 08:13 AM
i don't plan to ever retire.

i will work my lawn maintenance business until i can no longer do it due to physical conditions or i die.

after lawn maintenance i will likely get some job my old decaying body can handle until the day i die.

retired life is not for me.

Richard Martin
10-20-2011, 07:28 PM
I plan to stop just as soon as I am able. Hopefully in a few years. We have a plan and it doesn't include me dying in the seat of a stinking lawn mower.

4 seasons lawn&land
10-20-2011, 07:46 PM
Yup, like the other posts, I'll just keep on keeping on. I'm 65.

I really like what I'm doing. Mowing all summer, Florida all winter.

I can't really afford to do it. I just do it anyway. I bought a camper I couldn't afford and pull it with a truck I didn't need. The payments extend into my 70's.

I refuse to live my life waiting for someday.

Here's pics of what I do all winter;

http://s243.photobucket.com/home/thecampingman/index


Im 23 so wasnt really sure. But this sounds like as good a method as any!

Ducke
10-20-2011, 07:51 PM
Re-Tire ??????
Isn't that something you twice a year on your truck up north ???.

And if its suppose to be the golden years some one forgot to let them know.
nothing golden about getting older it just Sucks.

I'll work till I can't push my mower, ride my ZTR or drive my truck.
Then I will be looking up at the grass and not down at it.

4 seasons lawn&land
10-20-2011, 08:14 PM
lol.............

WenzelOSLLC
10-20-2011, 08:22 PM
I don't plan on "Retiring" but I do plan on taking lots of days off when I get older.

Hopefully my business will be at a point where I have multiple crews, office managers, and make enough to put in my pocket that I can work the days I want and do whatever I want to on the days I don't.

Best of both worlds that way and a steady income. :drinkup:

ed2hess
10-20-2011, 09:34 PM
Yup, like the other posts, I'll just keep on keeping on. I'm 65.

I really like what I'm doing. Mowing all summer, Florida all winter.

I can't really afford to do it. I just do it anyway. I bought a camper I couldn't afford and pull it with a truck I didn't need. The payments extend into my 70's.

I refuse to live my life waiting for someday.

Here's pics of what I do all winter;

http://s243.photobucket.com/home/thecampingman/index

Where do you stay when in Florida? I am kinda thinking about taking my sons trailer and pull over to Florida. I was in south Texas once and that doesn't seem very interesting...but a lot of snow birds come each year.

JB1
10-20-2011, 09:38 PM
i'm gonna hang out at a condo on the beach and work for somebody renting out them chairs and umbrellas.

larryinalabama
10-20-2011, 10:14 PM
Re-Tire ??????


And if its suppose to be the golden years some one forgot to let them know.
nothing golden about getting older it just Sucks.


Every year gets a little harder( most things). Eyes dont work as well misplace stuff, tired after only 12 hours of work, the worst thing is women at the same age as you are no longer attrictive.
The grass still grows and other than the achs and pains the lawncare business is still fun.

David Haggerty
10-21-2011, 07:27 AM
Where do you stay when in Florida? I am kinda thinking about taking my sons trailer and pull over to Florida. I was in south Texas once and that doesn't seem very interesting...but a lot of snow birds come each year.

Ft. Myers, Lee County. It's as far south as I can afford. Plus they have a lot of free public facilities.

Richard Martin
10-21-2011, 09:44 AM
Ft. Myers, Lee County. It's as far south as I can afford. Plus they have a lot of free public facilities.

My sister lives there. My son in law's parents were in Punta Gorda.

hackitdown
10-21-2011, 11:28 AM
I see no reason why I can't run my little business when I am older (I'm already 48). I'll still be able to do the sales, marketing, financial stuff, mechanic stuff, errands. I can make enough money from a busy mowing crew (hopefully 2 crews by then) to live on. The only concern is that I may not want to live around here when I am old because of the weather.

I plan to have four sources of income when I retire. Collect some Social Security, make a little money from my business, make a little money from RE rentals, and my IRA. If I can make a couple dollars from each source, things may be OK.

clydebusa
10-21-2011, 11:38 AM
Door Greeter at Wal Mart LOL
Probly do this till Im in the ground

Same here,, work the ground for a while then be in the ground the while.

clydebusa
10-21-2011, 11:41 AM
Yup, like the other posts, I'll just keep on keeping on. I'm 65.

I really like what I'm doing. Mowing all summer, Florida all winter.

I can't really afford to do it. I just do it anyway. I bought a camper I couldn't afford and pull it with a truck I didn't need. The payments extend into my 70's.

I refuse to live my life waiting for someday.

Here's pics of what I do all winter;

http://s243.photobucket.com/home/thecampingman/index



Nice, there is something good said about enjoying some life while you can instead of saving and dying 6 months before retirement.

Exact Rototilling
10-21-2011, 12:59 PM
Nice, there is something good said about enjoying some life while you can instead of saving and dying 6 months before retirement.

A lot can be said for smelling the roses now while working vs a full throttle grind and injury fest while actively working. My goal is to be able to carry my kayak to.the waters edge with out making my back injury worse. Even if my back could handle.it zero.time.to.play.

It seems far too many here on lawnsite suffer from back problems requiring surgery. It's my goal to not ever have back.surgery. I'm prepared to get out of this business if my back doesn't show dramatic improvement over the winter.

When I was in high school I was always perplexed that many retire but are in such bad shape physically it hampers their retirement.
Posted via Mobile Device

David Haggerty
10-22-2011, 06:52 AM
I see no reason why I can't run my little business when I am older (I'm already 48). I'll still be able to do the sales, marketing, financial stuff, mechanic stuff, errands. I can make enough money from a busy mowing crew (hopefully 2 crews by then) to live on. The only concern is that I may not want to live around here when I am old because of the weather.

I plan to have four sources of income when I retire. Collect some Social Security, make a little money from my business, make a little money from RE rentals, and my IRA. If I can make a couple dollars from each source, things may be OK.

That was EXACTLY my plan. And I can tell you it's working out really well. I just signed up for social security, annual withdrawals from my IRA, 3 rentals, and still keeping all my best mowing customers. Just working solo though. Actually profiting more than when I had crews.

I never planned to get rich. When you do that you have to go for broke, and that's usually the way people wind up, broke.

David Haggerty
10-22-2011, 07:02 AM
Posted via Mobile Device[/size]


I've found kayaking a very good way to build up back muscles. I pulled a muscle in my back when I was 40. It's hurt ever since. At 60 I started kayaking, biking and doing yoga stretches like they have on TV on PBS. It's really working out the kinks.
You have to take care of yourself at least as well as you maintain your equipment. That's what I tell my wife when I want a new kayak.:)

Exact Rototilling
10-22-2011, 11:48 AM
I've found kayaking a very good way to build up back muscles. I pulled a muscle in my back when I was 40. It's hurt ever since. At 60 I started kayaking, biking and doing yoga stretches like they have on TV on PBS. It's really working out the kinks.
You have to take care of yourself at least as well as you maintain your equipment. That's what I tell my wife when I want a new kayak.:)

You are correct paddling usess many of the same core muscles that protect the back and provide support for.the.structure and prevent injury. Lack of.proper sleep, habitual improper lifting and use of.a steel.side.catcher is what did my back.in.

Some of the best kayaking in this area is right now. Summer boaters are generally off the water, leaves are turning color. My kayaks are the heavy cheap ones.from.Costco I.hope.to upgrade to faster and.lighter glide fest models at.some.point.

I absolutely have to get away from operating in a all.work.and no play state of.mind. I bought a Kawasaki KLR 650 back in 2000 just to.fight cronic burn out i was under from working an.office desk job plus an identical home business. Anyhow the bike has less than 5600 miles on it and is riden less every.year. Because of my upbringing that play is a.waste.of.productive time and should be used to get stuff done I would literally feel guilty about joy riding in the backcountry as well as.feeling refreshed from the exhilaration of the ride and getting away.from.it.all. Throw in an abrasive marriage in the mix and nonsensical Tug of war verbal battles on how I should run my business....anyhow it's a poor combination.

My son has been the biggest loser and he just turned 11. Looking getting a side by side ATV so just.the 2 of.us can go.riding in the back woods just minutes from.here. I spent less time with my son just the two of us than any other growing season.
Posted via Mobile Device

tyler_mott85
10-22-2011, 12:37 PM
I'm 26 and have been slowly setting in motion plans to not have to "work" by the time I'm 50 or so.

Within 5 years I will own between 10 and 15 acres of land debt free from which point I will begin a slow and very "cheap" transition from city life to self sufficiency. Build an earthsheltered home and establish off the grid living. From that point with no mortgage and no utilities I will begin growing/raising a large portion of my family's food supply from my land. I will then only have to work to fill in the gaps and pretty much save up money for my early retirement at 50 years at which point hopefully I will have a nice business to sell and have a nice little golden nugget.

So by retiring at 50 while I may not be "working" I will be busy around the "homestead".

I don't have a lot of faith in the current projection of "city life". The school systems in larger cities worry me as well as society's current path to not have any actual human to human contact ever again though technologies. Which I find funny they're called "Smart" phones but they make the users dumb. If I'm going to be forced to not have human to human contact in the city. I might as well not have any contact in the country but be self sufficient. Anyone I've always talked to that grew up in the city but then decided to raise their family in the country said it was the best thing they could of ever done.

Yup...That's my plan.

Exact Rototilling
10-22-2011, 01:24 PM
I'm 26 and have been slowly setting in motion plans to not have to "work" by the time I'm 50 or so.

Within 5 years I will own between 10 and 15 acres of land debt free from which point I will begin a slow and very "cheap" transition from city life to self sufficiency. Build an earthsheltered home and establish off the grid living. From that point with no mortgage and no utilities I will begin growing/raising a large portion of my family's food supply from my land. I will then only have to work to fill in the gaps and pretty much save up money for my early retirement at 50 years at which point hopefully I will have a nice business to sell and have a nice little golden nugget.

So by retiring at 50 while I may not be "working" I will be busy around the "homestead".

I don't have a lot of faith in the current projection of "city life". The school systems in larger cities worry me as well as society's current path to not have any actual human to human contact ever again though technologies. Which I find funny they're called "Smart" phones but they make the users dumb. If I'm going to be forced to not have human to human contact in the city. I might as well not have any contact in the country but be self sufficient. Anyone I've always talked to that grew up in the city but then decided to raise their family in the country said it was the best thing they could of ever done.

Yup...That's my plan.

:clapping::clapping:

I have had the same basic goals and Iím no where near having the land debt free in this time frame.

Iím assuming your wife has the same goals as you?

Back when I was a youngster in grade school I lived in suburbia tract housing upper middle class southern California. I hated it back then from my earliest memory. I could not understand why people wanted to live like this.

Success to me is being a minimalist and doing just as you said. Friends and family have told me, ďeveryone canít go and just run off and live off-gridĒ ....so we just have to settle for whatever. :confused::hammerhead:

David Haggerty
10-23-2011, 07:38 AM
play is a.waste.of.productive time and should be used to get stuff done I would literally feel guilty about joy riding in the backcountry as well as.feeling refreshed from the exhilaration of the ride and getting away.from.it.all. Posted via Mobile Device

That's just not true. It's PRODUCTIVE use of your time. And recreation is very productive use of time. It energizes you and refreshes you and prepares you.
The Germans are the most productive workers in the world AND Germany has the most holidays.

Motorcycling is the way I started recreation. Now my Honda Magna sits more and more. Even though I take it to Florida it sits while I do stuff a little more physical. Plus traffic in florida is literally murder.

I started with a pretty fine kayak. A 12' Current designs "Kestrel". Bought it used on Craigslist. I outgrew it the first year and bought a 17' Necky "Chatham" sea kayak. Pretty fast, but not quite there yet. So I bought an old Seda "Glider" 19'. The wife says "WTF? you have TWO already!"
I said "I gotta take care of the KEY element in my mowing operation, ME!"
I sold the Kestrel and this summer stripped and re-gelcoated the Glider. My first time ever using gelcoat but it turned out excellent! Imagine ME with a $3500 kayak! It's fast! I paddle some lakes here in Ohio, but even a 10 mile lake feels kind of small. In Florida I go from town to town, island to island. With the sun on my back, beautiful day, crystal clear water a man feels like he's master of the world. It makes me want to do something that's very good for me.
Chronic depression runs deep in my family, but I've got that demon under control.:laugh:

larryinalabama
10-23-2011, 10:40 AM
[QUOTE=hackitdown;4193093]I see no reason why I can't run my little business when I am older (I'm already 48). I'll still be able to do the sales, marketing, financial stuff, mechanic stuff, errands. I can make enough money from a busy mowing crew (hopefully 2 crews by then) to live on. The only concern is that I may not want to live around here when I am old because of the weather.

I plan to have four sources of income when I retire. Collect some Social Security, make a little money from my business, make a little money from RE rentals, and my IRA. If I can make a couple dollars from each source, things may be OK.[/QUOTE

Thats exactly my plan. IM 46 and getting there. life hit me hard this year and it will take 4 to five years to recover from that, Im hoping Real Estate will still be in the tank at that point in time.

larryinalabama
10-23-2011, 10:51 AM
I'm 26 and have been slowly setting in motion plans to not have to "work" by the time I'm 50 or so.

Within 5 years I will own between 10 and 15 acres of land debt free from which point I will begin a slow and very "cheap" transition from city life to self sufficiency. Build an earthsheltered home and establish off the grid living. From that point with no mortgage and no utilities I will begin growing/raising a large portion of my family's food supply from my land. I will then only have to work to fill in the gaps and pretty much save up money for my early retirement at 50 years at which point hopefully I will have a nice business to sell and have a nice little golden nugget.

So by retiring at 50 while I may not be "working" I will be busy around the "homestead".

I don't have a lot of faith in the current projection of "city life". The school systems in larger cities worry me as well as society's current path to not have any actual human to human contact ever again though technologies. Which I find funny they're called "Smart" phones but they make the users dumb. If I'm going to be forced to not have human to human contact in the city. I might as well not have any contact in the country but be self sufficient. Anyone I've always talked to that grew up in the city but then decided to raise their family in the country said it was the best thing they could of ever done.

Yup...That's my plan.

Ive studied being self sufficent till Im blun in the face. Solar is too expensive to be practicle. I really dont kno how the Omish do it.
Most of the people living this way have cut their lifestyle down to virtually nothing.
I moved from So California to Alabama in 1992, that was A move Ill never regret and have not looked back since. Country living is great, but it in no way means you have to be poor.

Post some sulf sufficent ideas . Theres some mini acohol stills avaible, you can cook and run your car on the stuff. Solar is impractricle althought is is slighjtly cheaper than it used to be.

tyler_mott85
10-23-2011, 12:12 PM
Ive studied being self sufficent till Im blun in the face. Solar is too expensive to be practicle. I really dont kno how the Omish do it.
Most of the people living this way have cut their lifestyle down to virtually nothing.
I moved from So California to Alabama in 1992, that was A move Ill never regret and have not looked back since. Country living is great, but it in no way means you have to be poor.

Post some sulf sufficent ideas . Theres some mini acohol stills avaible, you can cook and run your car on the stuff. Solar is impractricle althought is is slighjtly cheaper than it used to be.

Luckily Kansas is a windy place to live so I will probably rely on at least 50/50 wind/sun for sources of energy. But like you said solar is still expensive...as is all non traditional sources of energy. The best thing I can come up with to combat the cost of the technology is to use less of it.

By building in ground you harness the benefits of the earth as an energy "battery" so to speak. The earth is not a good insulator but it is good at holding heat and cool. It is naturally 55 degrees or so year round so cooling your undergound house is as easy as NOT DOING ANYTHING! And when you do heat your house the surrounding earth holds the heat to be released back into the house when your heat source isn't currently on. By positioning your house at the optimal southerly direction you can provide tons if not all of your light needs for the daylight hours. In doing some research I've learned the optimal angle for an overhang on the south side of the house so that when in the summer months your southern windows are shaded and in the winter you get sunlight inside your house to heat the floors. And I think that by simply adjusting how you live can dramatically reduce your need for artificial light sources at night.

The cavemen used to do it. :)

There's also all kinds of things to do for water as well. I'm planning on a solar powered well. When there is light and you need water it will pump out of the well directly. When there is no light the houses battery system will pump water and if the batteries go dead and there's no light there will be a last ditch water tank system holding water for use if needed.

And taking the water well a step further I will use it to water crops but only when the house's systems are fully charged. Any extra energy made beyond capacity of the batteries or the needs of the house will go to run irrigation for crops that need more water. Tomatoes, Corn, etc.

I could go on and on but this isn't a thread about "how to live like a caveman"

Exact Rototilling
10-23-2011, 01:00 PM
All the planning of southern exposure and natural sunlight....could end up going sideways if we end up having a pole shift? Or even a bad wobble from.a pole shift. But if that's the case massive Mega tsunami waves will wipe out much if not all coastal areas. Picture the 2012 movie. But yes it makes perfect sense to me. Having large greenhouses whereyou can extended your growing season to @10 months out of the year in northern climates is a wise plan.
Posted via Mobile Device

Exact Rototilling
10-23-2011, 01:59 PM
That's just not true. It's PRODUCTIVE use of your time. And recreation is very productive use of time. It energizes you and refreshes you and prepares you.
The Germans are the most productive workers in the world AND Germany has the most holidays. ....snip.....

I completely agree that down time is productive. This all work and NO PLAY mentality was from my childhood upbringing.

My grandfather worked for the railroad as a machinist back during the depression and worked 7 days a week with no vacation or sick time. He took an office job to get half days off on Sunday but couldnít stand shuffling papers.

My dad was a math teacher and graded papers many of the weekends when I was growing up. Weekends were full of yard work and frankly not much fun ac activities. We lived in a nice upper middle class neighborhood and many of my friends spent their weekends snow skiing, boating and time spent at their lake cabins. We did yard work. :cry: :hammerhead:

Life just has to have short term rewards as well as long term rewards mixed in. :drinkup:

larryinalabama
10-23-2011, 07:57 PM
Luckily Kansas is a windy place to live so I will probably rely on at least 50/50 wind/sun for sources of energy. But like you said solar is still expensive...as is all non traditional sources of energy. The best thing I can come up with to combat the cost of the technology is to use less of it.

By building in ground you harness the benefits of the earth as an energy "battery" so to speak. The earth is not a good insulator but it is good at holding heat and cool. It is naturally 55 degrees or so year round so cooling your undergound house is as easy as NOT DOING ANYTHING! And when you do heat your house the surrounding earth holds the heat to be released back into the house when your heat source isn't currently on. By positioning your house at the optimal southerly direction you can provide tons if not all of your light needs for the daylight hours. In doing some research I've learned the optimal angle for an overhang on the south side of the house so that when in the summer months your southern windows are shaded and in the winter you get sunlight inside your house to heat the floors. And I think that by simply adjusting how you live can dramatically reduce your need for artificial light sources at night.

The cavemen used to do it. :)

There's also all kinds of things to do for water as well. I'm planning on a solar powered well. When there is light and you need water it will pump out of the well directly. When there is no light the houses battery system will pump water and if the batteries go dead and there's no light there will be a last ditch water tank system holding water for use if needed.

And taking the water well a step further I will use it to water crops but only when the house's systems are fully charged. Any extra energy made beyond capacity of the batteries or the needs of the house will go to run irrigation for crops that need more water. Tomatoes, Corn, etc.

I could go on and on but this isn't a thread about "how to live like a caveman"

Its good to see like minded spirits in here. Many of my customers are built into hillsides to be on the "water". On customer has a 3 story home with 4 super large heat pumps, he tol me his power bill was only 500$, it seems unbelivable but I dont doubt him.
Ive never thought about building underground except for a fallout shelter. Guess we all be underground at some point in time.
A pond would serve better for irragation, as water in any situation is the key to success or survival so save the well for inside the home.
Wind power is gaining popularity. wind solar combos are becoming more affordable, wood if avaible for free is still the answer for heat.
Lights are actually becoming a non issue, soon led lights will replace floresents, and I figure a 80w solar panewl and 1 battery will keep your home well lit.
Post some more ideas.

Paradise Yard Service
10-25-2011, 03:04 PM
At 51 I plan on doing some light duty lawn care when we relocate back to Hawaii in a few years.

Need plenty of bodysurf time!

Aloha

greendoctor
10-25-2011, 03:20 PM
I consider what I am doing semi retirement. Much easier on me than what I used to do. I actually do not work as hard even though I am self employed VS when I was an employee. Looks like I will be spraying lawns and trees until I cannot walk any more.

gsaunders5
10-30-2011, 07:14 AM
Hey Dave, I sent you a private message, should be in your inbox.

Thanks

Gary




Yup, like the other posts, I'll just keep on keeping on. I'm 65.

I really like what I'm doing. Mowing all summer, Florida all winter.

I can't really afford to do it. I just do it anyway. I bought a camper I couldn't afford and pull it with a truck I didn't need. The payments extend into my 70's.

I refuse to live my life waiting for someday.

Here's pics of what I do all winter;

http://s243.photobucket.com/home/thecampingman/index