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smallstripesnc
10-23-2011, 10:26 AM
I've been mowing grass all summer off of craigslist and one thing I've noticed is a lot of people really like not having to worry about a estimate.

Flat rate prices keep things simple but at the same time is it worth it to do the whole "estimate" thing?

I do get burned on a few lawns but not that many.

My ex is this.

1/2 acre or less: $25
1/2 acre to 1 acre: $35
1 acre to 1 1/2 acre: $45
1 1/2 acre to 2 acres: $55

You get the idea.

Is this a good idea or will it cause my business to completely fail.

Also not adding contracts into the mix seems to keep customers happy as well. A lot of my customers say they get screwed on contracts and wouldn't ever sign one again.

Any input would be greatly appreciated!

fireman gus
10-23-2011, 10:36 AM
On the other hand I have had people, without a service agreement form, take advantage of me because of what they thought we had agreed upon. With an agreement form everyone know what is expected and the price for that service.

guitarman2420
10-23-2011, 07:52 PM
How can you "drop the tailgate" for $25.00? I don't see how you can eke out a living with your pricing. An acre for $55?

RSK Property Maintenance
10-23-2011, 10:15 PM
I wanna say that's what bigger company's around do. But they might start at 30 and be 5 dollars or maybe even 7 dollars each so 1 acre would be 50 dollars or so. And these guys have 2 60" mowers and guy trimming so they fly thru lawns. I heard one of the bigger companies like Andover landscaping has somewhere around 250 accounts so pricing them cheaper works when u have a lot
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cpllawncare
10-23-2011, 10:21 PM
If I was going to do that I would start at $45 and go up from there, You are in this to make money, not give away your services for free or be the cheapest guy out there, I've learned a lot over the past year, it's more about quality and superior service than price, at least for me. I have service agreements not contracts. It's for you and the customers protection!

Darryl G
10-23-2011, 10:42 PM
I can see using a pricing schedule like that as a general guide but not as an absolute pricing structure. Some properties just take a long time to service because of access, layout, rate of grass growth, the amount of trimming etc. The correlation between the size of a lot and the time it takes, and therefore the amount it should cost, is not absolute, so I don't think the pricing structure should be. I have a 5k sq foot lawn that takes me as long as a 15k sq foot lawn. Both are $40 and take about 25 minutes. Why would my 25 minutes of time be worth less money on the 5K lawn?

My first impression of the description of your business and pricing is that you are doomed to failure.

32vld
10-23-2011, 11:37 PM
Flat rate shows one is too lazy to do estimates or doesn't know how to do estimates.

How can anyone do a half acre for $35 and then do one acre for $35 at the same price with double the work?

Something wrong with that pricing system.

cpllawncare
10-23-2011, 11:43 PM
Flat rate shows one is too lazy to do estimates or doesn't know how to do estimates.

How can anyone do a half acre for $35 and then do one acre for $35 at the same price with double the work?

Something wrong with that pricing system.

Good point!

smallstripesnc
10-24-2011, 01:58 PM
Thank you for the honest responses.

The going rate where I'm at is $25 (What others have quoted them) for a lot of the yards I currently cut. A lot of them are 1/4 acre or so and take about 30 minutes or less with a push mower.

I do agree maybe I should re-think the whole "no estimates" think and just use my price guide as a base to start with.

I knew when I posted I would get the truth and thats what I want.

Now my question is since a lot of the other lawn care company's seem to be super cheap (quoting a lot of my yards at $20-$25) is it because they are trying to be the "cheapest" out there? And I need to be different and actually give them a realistic quote and value my work?

I need this business to work for my family and I know I can do it but need honest opinions.

OH I saw the worlds craziest thing on CL. Now just think this is my competition.

NAME YOUR PRICE LAWN CARE! They let the customers tell them what they want to pay and go from there. I just think thats crazy.

MDLawn
10-24-2011, 05:25 PM
On the other hand I have had people, without a service agreement form, take advantage of me because of what they thought we had agreed upon. With an agreement form everyone know what is expected and the price for that service.

ABSOLUTELY!! Just so EVERYONE is on the same page.

If I was going to do that I would start at $45 and go up from there, You are in this to make money, not give away your services for free or be the cheapest guy out there, I've learned a lot over the past year, it's more about quality and superior service than price, at least for me. I have service agreements not contracts. It's for you and the customers protection!

Find these customers and sell to them, not to joe schmoe.

I can see using a pricing schedule like that as a general guide but not as an absolute pricing structure. Some properties just take a long time to service because of access, layout, rate of grass growth, the amount of trimming etc. The correlation between the size of a lot and the time it takes, and therefore the amount it should cost, is not absolute, so I don't think the pricing structure should be. I have a 5k sq foot lawn that takes me as long as a 15k sq foot lawn. Both are $40 and take about 25 minutes. Why would my 25 minutes of time be worth less money on the 5K lawn?

The exact reason there is never a flat rate for anything! Maybe your service for "X" size starts at $XX.XX.

My first impression of the description of your business and pricing is that you are doomed to failure.



Thank you for the honest responses.

The going rate where I'm at is $25 (What others have quoted them) Who says they're the going rate? Maybe they are just cheap too??? for a lot of the yards I currently cut. A lot of them are 1/4 acre or so and take about 30 minutes or less with a push mower Are you not using commercial equipment??.

I do agree maybe I should re-think the whole "no estimates" think and just use my price guide as a base to start with.

I knew when I posted I would get the truth and thats what I want.

Now my question is since a lot of the other lawn care company's seem to be super cheap (quoting a lot of my yards at $20-$25) is it because they are trying to be the "cheapest" out there? And I need to be different and actually give them a realistic quote and value my work?

Quantity Vs. Quality. They both can work. Quality takes time to build but you have better customers. Hard to have those two things working together, quantity AND quality.

I need this business to work for my family and I know I can do it but need honest opinions.

This business takes time to build right. Many get stuck with the thoughts "If I can get "x" more lawns I can make this much!! Wow if I can get "xx" lawns I can make even more. Before you know it the quality work you started on becomes quantity work that cannot get done with quality because you have to get them done to make your "x" goal.

OH I saw the worlds craziest thing on CL. Now just think this is my competition.

NAME YOUR PRICE LAWN CARE! They let the customers tell them what they want to pay and go from there. I just think thats crazy.

Put your blinders on and focus on what you need to do to make your living. Following an unsuccessful model just makes you well, unsuccessful. Just because someone has lots of equipment and trucks doesnt mean they are rolling in it. People want you to be accountable and do good work. When you meet a potential customer ask them if they had a lawn service. If so why did they not continue with them? I've had answers to that such as "He never trimmed along the fence", "They never returned my repeated calls for extra work", "They never showed up after a few weeks" (the classic quantity problem with a single op business). This is the simplest way to get those customers and keep them happy. I have a guy who told me the previous company never returned his calls or emails. He gets a response in 24hrs to anything he questions. Never have a problem with him.

noobie206
10-24-2011, 05:37 PM
Hey i just started out this year.. ill tell you some of my prices all with a push mower and im not really sure if im cheap or expensive. As long as I'm making profit after the expenses (fuel to commute, fuel for equipment, and other business related fees for the month) im good. But I dont pay for rent but I plan to help my parents out and pay for everything once the business starts rolling.. lol. I do pay for cable and telephone-mine and the house. :)

Examples:
-One house takes me 20 minutes max.to mow, string edge, and blow = $ 25 bucks,
-two other houses right next door are a little smaller and same service = $ 50 for both. In 1 hour I made 75..

-I have another house that takes me 20 minutes to mow, string edge and blow = $40
and another 2 minutes away. 30 minutes = 40 bucks. so basically in 1 hour I made 80 bucks.

but yeah.. and i think larger companies may charge less because they don't care if they're under pricing just as long as they're getting production and trying to boom.. and they have all types of equipment to finish things faster and get more done..

I live in Seattle by the way and some of the houses I cut are saturated in many locations around Seattle.

i might be missing some details but whatevs..

smallstripesnc
10-24-2011, 05:39 PM
Thank you for the reply. So the flat rate price idea sounds very bad for me and i will not continue with that as part of my business.

Now say i distribute flyers in neighborhoods that most all the yards look to same and i already have a few yards in the same area would it be okay to offer a neighborhood special price of $x amount based on size of the lots since they are generally the same size.
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ed2hess
10-24-2011, 05:40 PM
How can you "drop the tailgate" for $25.00? I don't see how you can eke out a living with your pricing. An acre for $55?

He don't overestimate the cost of labor......

noobie206
10-24-2011, 05:49 PM
it all depends on your expenses... i would give them a little discount for saving you the commute to other locations not so close to you.. the person may even refer you to a house down the block.. the best way for me to get referrals is to do a great job on my service, build a relationship and be down to earth..

cpllawncare
10-24-2011, 06:23 PM
He don't overestimate the cost of labor......

At $25 I would be losing money, as a single owner you have to pay yourself, and I'm pretty sure it ain't gonna be $10/hr or less, but I may be wrong.

MDLawn
10-24-2011, 06:54 PM
Thank you for the reply. So the flat rate price idea sounds very bad for me and i will not continue with that as part of my business.

Now say i distribute flyers in neighborhoods that most all the yards look to same and i already have a few yards in the same area would it be okay to offer a neighborhood special price of $x amount based on size of the lots since they are generally the same size.
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Say you give a discount rate (which just attracts problems to begin with) to 5 customers in a neighborhood. Well they are deal hunters and 3 out of 5 drop you the following year for cheaper prices. Do those 2 still get a discount rate? If most lots are the same you know what they can cost so estimating them isn't as hard or if people call you can say "I know the lawns in your neighborhood and most start at $XX.XX but could be more if there is a lot of trimming or fences, etc..." Saves some of the trouble of going to a place only to find out they don't like your starting price. I wouldnt say you work in the neighborhood because the "Give me a discount since I'm down the street" can come out. Everyone and every area is different (cost of living) and we all have our own opinions. I'm getting out of lawns and just focusing on landscaping. It has become a circus in the past couple years and most focus on volume only so the prices will always be low.

clydebusa
10-24-2011, 07:25 PM
I can see using a pricing schedule like that as a general guide but not as an absolute pricing structure. Some properties just take a long time to service because of access, layout, rate of grass growth, the amount of trimming etc. The correlation between the size of a lot and the time it takes, and therefore the amount it should cost, is not absolute, so I don't think the pricing structure should be. I have a 5k sq foot lawn that takes me as long as a 15k sq foot lawn. Both are $40 and take about 25 minutes. Why would my 25 minutes of time be worth less money on the 5K lawn?

My first impression of the description of your business and pricing is that you are doomed to failure.

I would agree with this, and would say to make money at those prices you don't have insurance and do not pay taxes at all.

smallstripesnc
10-24-2011, 08:34 PM
From the sounds of it the ONLY way I'll actually make decent money and be able to actually get PAID for my time and work is to do estimates. Which does make sense after reading your posts.

Now I suppose the hard part is estimating work since all properties are different. Whats a good starting price? and how do you come up with the prices to charge a customer?

I'm sure the number of tree's, (estimated) time to cut the property, size, slopes and banks, natural areas, amount of line trimmed, fence or no fence, gate or no gate (If gate to backyard CAN I fit my 48' walkbehind through it). If not I'll have to use the 22' Toro recycler which will take longer which equals I charge more. Etc....

I'm sorry to ask so many questions. I just want to do this right. From what I read about estimating it really is hard to know where to begin. A lot of people do it differently.

guitarman2420
10-24-2011, 09:32 PM
I've been doing this @ 5 years now. I've done some things right and some wrong; but I'm learning from the mistakes. It sounds like you are trying to learn and that's a good thing. My list of mistakes:

1. Not doing estimates - people will lie and tell you that the leaves are only from this year's fall and you get there and there's 5 years worth of leaves. They know once they have you on site you will probably do the job. Let's see . . . that experience took me @ 8 hours of labor for a job I thought would take 2-3. Another good one is that the yard is flat and when you get there to aerate it you can't even stand on it. The only answer is to go look at it. If you take a lawn to mow and miss price it you may have to live with it for a year.

2. Buy equipment without having knowledge . . . nuff said - I still have a "42" Gravelly Z-turnthat runs faster than a go-cart but tears up yards if I use it.

3. Borrowing too much money because I wanted to grow fast. I know some people are successful with that strategy; but I'm growing slower now, organically and more profitable.

4. Never take a "loss leader". In other words don't try and buy your business by underbidding something because it will lead to other business. I lived that one too ... cost me a few thousand because the "big one" never came - I was just stuck with the badly priced contract.

5. Worrying too much about employees - I came from an industry where employees stayed around and you could train them, care for them, treat them like family. In this business, I'm afraid I've learned to have 1-2 trusted managers or employees and the rest of them are interchangeable parts. I know that sounds harsh; but I've had my feelings hurt too many times and put on my "big boy shoes" and realized that I'm not in business to have nice feelings; but make money.

smallstripesnc
10-24-2011, 09:55 PM
Thank you for outlining your mistakes. I do want to learn and honestly I love learning especially about my future career as a lawn care company.

Right now I'm only offering mowing services and SOME leaf removal (Up to 1/2 acre only) because I only have a push mower with a bagger. Now I have read that bagging the leaves with a mower isn't the most efficient way and some people may not like it done this way and would want a leaf vac to get the job done so maybe I need to even cross leaf removal off my list until I can get the equipment to do it right.

So far with my craigslist advertising and "flat rate prices" I've ran into a few bad properties.

I think the worst was a guy who was trying to sell his house (he was a preacher at a church) and pretty much told me this "I'm a preacher so do a good job and I can get you a ton of business" and told me he wanted his lawn cut as short as I could cut it. Keep in mind this was beautiful tall fescue. I was very upset that he wanted it cut so low and explained the benefits of cutting it higher and he still insisted I cut it low. I cut it (Not too low) but about 2 inches because it was very high to begin with and I was using my 22' Toro recycler personal pace (set up for mulching) and it would be too much for it to cut too much off plus I really would rather not tear up a expensive mower (Expensive in my opinion since I saved up for awhile to get it) and felt bad to kill such a beautiful plant (tall fescue).

After I was finished he pretty much said it wasn't short enough which I expected but told him from the start I can only cut it as short as my mower will let me without tearing it up. So of course the guy was a little pissed but I said I charged "$20 flat rate" and that's what I got paid for like two hours of work since it was so high and he wanted it cut so low.

So a estimate would of saved me from turning down other lawns for a two hour job that paid $20. I would of told the guy I would of charged at least $40 for it. It was about 1/2 acre.

At this time I'm not looking for employees but I do have a few friends wanting to work with me but I'm just not at the point of being able to pay someone.

guitarman2420
10-24-2011, 10:24 PM
Fescue in North Carolina? I thought you had only warm season grasses down there.

Another lesson learned that your posting reminded me of --- don't give someone the same price per cut for cutting every 2 weeks as every week. If the grass is thick, it will take you twice as long - you'll have to cut it at least twice, probably rake it or blow it off because of clumping. I tell people if they want a nice lawn cut every 2 weeks that the price is 50% higher than a single cut.

Also preachers and doctors are the worse clients. Each of them think they are a little too close to God. The preacher talks to God and the doctor advises God:laugh:

smallstripesnc
10-24-2011, 10:34 PM
I'm actually in Monroe, NC right outside of Charlotte. Most of my work is in Charlotte. A lot of people have tall fescue because they like that it doesn't turn brown in the winter. In the summer everyone usually cuts it 3 to 3 1/2 inches to keep it from dying in the heat.

That is very true with the bi-weekly people. I have already ran into that issue. In my area we typically have two types of grass besides weeds. Tall fescue and bermuda grass. Well I've had people that want their grass cut bi-weekly with bermuda which is very hard to cut when high and have had to double cut which took me way too long. Plus dealing with a mower choking out is always fun.

Is 50% higher than a weekly cut still getting you business though? I guess my mind is warped from the craigslist people but many of the people I've cut every two weeks really couldn't afford more. I guess thats why I need to market in the wealthier neighborhoods where people care about their turf and don't mind spending more IF its needed.

guitarman2420
10-24-2011, 10:50 PM
Yeah, I wouldn't build my business around Craig's list. I NEVER compete on price. I compete on VALUE. Value is a different measurement than cost or quality. It's a combination of both. I have been eliminating the low quality clients.

Darryl G
10-24-2011, 11:42 PM
4. Never take a "loss leader". In other words don't try and buy your business by underbidding something because it will lead to other business. I lived that one too ... cost me a few thousand because the "big one" never came - I was just stuck with the badly priced contract.


I agree with everything else you said but I take minor exception to this one, under certain circumstances.

I have 4 accounts in a really nice high end subdivision that I'd like more work in. The problem is that 2 of them are down really long driveways (500 plus feet) so I park down the driveways and am invisible to passers by. The third one is at the end of a cul-de-sac that only the next door neighbor would see me at. So, I'd like to be a bit more visible out by the road for residents of the subdivision to see me and my work. I got an opportunity to bid a lawn that is on the main access road to the subdivision 4 or 5 houses in. I basically bid it at my break even point just for the visibility and marketing potential to have my truck out front late on Thursday afternoon. It's a solid hour for me to service it. It's a nice looking fertilized and irrigated lawn and a $600k house. Normally I'd be in the $60 to $65 range for it but I took it at $45. It didn't really take a mowing slot, it's at the end of my day when I normally would be heading home. I was upfront with the customer about why my price was so attrative and that it was just for this season. Cleanups are at my normal rates. It's actually a spring and fall only account, the owner takes care of it during the summer and does a nice job of it. His work load is such that he just doesn't have time to do it in the spring and fall.

This isn't something I do often, but I really wanted this lawn for it's marketing potential. Nothing has come of it yet, and I'm ok with that. I'm just saying that under certain circumstances one might go on the low side to secure a job that has high visibility and the potential to bring in additonal work. For me anyway...and I'm not about to fill my schedule with them.

smallstripesnc
10-24-2011, 11:51 PM
Unfortunately I cut a beautiful lawn that is very well taken care of as well. I actually use the customers 21' Toro recycler and bag the lawn and I always stripe it and make it look beautiful. BUT the driveway is long and not many see it =/. Its my best work so far and I'm very proud after I cut it. It was from my "flat rate price" craigslist ad and I get $25 and it takes me about an hour BUT I do use her gas and equipment besides my line trimmer. I really wish this property could be seen more often than just her next door neighbor.

So I do see your point about that and I will get off of craigslist and do it right with estimates and all. You guys all talked me into doing it right. The benefits are clear and can't go wrong with doing it right and getting paid what I deserve.

clydebusa
10-26-2011, 10:42 AM
I agree with everything else you said but I take minor exception to this one, under certain circumstances.

I have 4 accounts in a really nice high end subdivision that I'd like more work in. The problem is that 2 of them are down really long driveways (500 plus feet) so I park down the driveways and am invisible to passers by. The third one is at the end of a cul-de-sac that only the next door neighbor would see me at. So, I'd like to be a bit more visible out by the road for residents of the subdivision to see me and my work. I got an opportunity to bid a lawn that is on the main access road to the subdivision 4 or 5 houses in. I basically bid it at my break even point just for the visibility and marketing potential to have my truck out front late on Thursday afternoon. It's a solid hour for me to service it. It's a nice looking fertilized and irrigated lawn and a $600k house. Normally I'd be in the $60 to $65 range for it but I took it at $45. It didn't really take a mowing slot, it's at the end of my day when I normally would be heading home. I was upfront with the customer about why my price was so attrative and that it was just for this season. Cleanups are at my normal rates. It's actually a spring and fall only account, the owner takes care of it during the summer and does a nice job of it. His work load is such that he just doesn't have time to do it in the spring and fall.

This isn't something I do often, but I really wanted this lawn for it's marketing potential. Nothing has come of it yet, and I'm ok with that. I'm just saying that under certain circumstances one might go on the low side to secure a job that has high visibility and the potential to bring in additonal work. For me anyway...and I'm not about to fill my schedule with them.

My only drawback to this way of pricing would be if neighbors talk to each. Why do you charge xxxx to them and me xxxxx.
I have had this happen several times and 2 days ago was the latest.

Darryl G
10-26-2011, 11:45 AM
Yeah well, different lawn, different price. This is not a cookie cutter subdivision where all the lawns are similar in size with a simialr character. These are all half million dollar plus homes in a rocky forested area. Every lawn has a character of it's own and some are downright difficult mows that you can't really even take a Z rider on, not safely anyway. You can't really compare one lawn to another. They are minimum 2 acre lots, not that they have 2 acres of turf.

Here's the subdivision.

MDLawn
10-26-2011, 06:32 PM
Yeah well, different lawn, different price. This is not a cookie cutter subdivision where all the lawns are similar in size with a simialr character. These are all half million dollar plus homes in a rocky forested area. Every lawn has a character of it's own and some are downright difficult mows that you can't really even take a Z rider on, not safely anyway. You can't really compare one lawn to another. They are minimum 2 acre lots, not that they have 2 acres of turf.

Here's the subdivision.

I love neigborhoods like that. It's amazing some people will drop over $500k on a house to only have it on 1/3 acre with zero property character. Yes I know some people like a huge house and thats it. But that place looks amazing and I'd love to live in a house that is surrounded by forest and not just lawns and other homes!!

Big C
11-26-2011, 12:27 PM
I've been mowing grass all summer off of craigslist and one thing I've noticed is a lot of people really like not having to worry about a estimate.

Flat rate prices keep things simple but at the same time is it worth it to do the whole "estimate" thing?

I do get burned on a few lawns but not that many.

My ex is this.

1/2 acre or less: $25
1/2 acre to 1 acre: $35
1 acre to 1 1/2 acre: $45
1 1/2 acre to 2 acres: $55


Is this a good idea or will it cause my business to completely fail.

Also not adding contracts into the mix seems to keep customers happy as well. A lot of my customers say they get screwed on contracts and wouldn't ever sign one again.

Any input would be greatly appreciated!

So what you're saying is you would the charge the same for a 1 acre property with 15 trees and a ton of ruts the same as you would an open flat 1acre lot with no trees or obsticales. I never quote prices over the phone..
You get the idea. I never quote prices over the phone....I had a guy call me and demand I give him a price over the phone for a property clean-up...when I told him thats not the way we operate and stuck to my guns...he understood and gave him an on site estimate and got the job anyway.

THIESSENS TLC
11-26-2011, 02:39 PM
also if a potential client says they got a price from some other company for x amount of money, ask them to prove it to you. (written quote from other company) otherwise they're probably lying to ya! The smallest account I have is about 400sq ft & takes no more than 5mins to complete, I get $20.00! And I only do it because its just down the road from a few other clients.

8rickyj
11-27-2011, 09:38 AM
Yeah, I wouldn't build my business around Craig's list. I NEVER compete on price. I compete on VALUE. Value is a different measurement than cost or quality. It's a combination of both. I have been eliminating the low quality clients.


I totally agree. There are better free ways to advertise than Craig's List. My first year I will admit I got talked down on price from a few customers and didn't charge enough to others, but I was nervous because I needed the money. Every time I mowed their lawn I was resentful to them and me for doing it for that price. I cant stand mowing and being mad lol. I did finish out the season with them with full intentions of raising the price the next year. Higher gas prices helped out with the reason for the price increase. Some were fine with it some were not. I had to let some of my customers go. Set a starting price and go up from there. We start at $35 and go from there, but that's here in Chicago-land. If they don't like your starting price, you just weeded out a potential pain in the butt account. If they say "so and so" will do it for this price then I tell them to go for it. YOU set your pricing not the other guy as long as your pricing isn't ridiculous. Focus on doing a good job and the customers will come. In the spring of 2010 I had 3 customers, this year in our peak we were mowing over 95. If you contact me I will tell you how I did it without putting out one fl-yer. There are easy free ways to get your name out there. I am not THAT brilliant lol, if I can do it so can you. God has blessed my hard work and I will give back freely to you what He has given me. I hope to hear from you. Good luck!

MR-G
11-27-2011, 11:48 PM
doing an estimate is the most important thing to your success....no 2 lawns are the same..we have 1/4 ac. lots that take longer to service than some 1/2 ac. lots...if you dont price each and every acct. for a profit you will fail......also at the time of an estimate you have the chance at up selling the potential client on other services you may offer like fertilizing, weeding, trimming, mulching, planting, ect.ect. dont sell yourself short and blow a good oppertunity just to mow....the extras will make you more in the long run....good luck

DuallyVette
11-28-2011, 01:19 AM
SmallstripesNC, I've been doing lawn maintenance in Charlotte for over 30 years. You're making me cry...

PS.
All my customers pay a flat fee 12 months out of the year + materials & extra services. During the drought of 1986, there was no grass to cut for two months, but I still have bills to pay, and employees to retain. If all jobs were billed per cut, you would need to double the fee and make sure that you saved 6 months worth of expenses, like Suzy Orman tells you.

If you want your clippings bagged, or the property needs to be mowed with a 21" mower, or you want the grass cut real short, or there's not a safe place for me to park my truck & trailer, or I don't like your attitude, ...you are not my customer. I only need customers that are profitable, and fit in with my plan.

If you want the lawn mowed every other week, it will cost twice as much per week, and be damaging to the health of your fescue lawn.

I'm sure I could go on....