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View Full Version : Business Owner Education Level Survey/Poll


MDLawn
11-01-2011, 09:34 AM
Just interested to see what the statistics, numbers, etc.. are for the lawn and landscaping business owners. This is not a thread asking if you need any certain level of education just more of an overview. This is also not meant to judge whether it is better to have a certain level of education. Business owners can be a pecuilar bunch and in all honesty I am just curious to see the results if anyone wishes to vote or post them. Sorry about the amount of selections but it gives everyone a choice! I've selected to keep the answers confindential if you worry.

MDLawn
11-01-2011, 12:02 PM
Thanks for getting the poll started!! Looks like it's starting out very diverse!!

MDLawn
11-01-2011, 05:03 PM
67 views and only 7 votes? Did I not put enough categories on there? :laugh:

MDLawn
11-02-2011, 11:06 AM
wow not one landscape degree yet

205mx
11-02-2011, 11:12 AM
I voted. Bachelors in Marketing. Its funny I learned more from trial and error and failures than I did in School. LOL

MDLawn
11-02-2011, 11:30 AM
I voted. Bachelors in Marketing. Its funny I learned more from trial and error and failures than I did in School. LOL

As do most. Schooling helps as a guide. I would like more plant/plant care knowledge that some schooling could have given. But local nurseries and books help.

Andy31
11-02-2011, 12:42 PM
B.S. Animal Science
Lawn and Landscaping Work: Most enjoyable career that you can be the boss and where your success or failure is up to you.
Cattle: a nice Seed Stock operation is in my future (10 year goal). SO in 10 years I hope to use my degree...until then I will keep reading books, attending seminars, and learning from my mistakes in the field.
This should turn into a nice thread, with several view points.

MDLawn
11-02-2011, 01:04 PM
This should turn into a nice thread, with several view points.

This is my hope for this. Let's see as a whole where the lawnsite group stands, whether highly educated or not. I'm sure it'll be a good mix though. What does this data collection have to do with us or show us? Not a whole lot unless you added other variables like age, income range, years in business, employees, etc.... But even then it would be so mixed, success depends on a person more than anything, but educations can often guide.

205mx
11-02-2011, 01:14 PM
My post was not intended to say I did not learn in school. (although a lot of it was useless) I am so
Ply saying I learned MORE in the field. I felt like I knew more about business than my business instructor
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MDLawn
11-03-2011, 03:29 PM
Not sure why I added PhD's in this but ya never know.

PR Fect
11-04-2011, 02:36 PM
67 views and only 7 votes? Did I not put enough categories on there? :laugh:

Did not see any Industry Training. I would think that falls into HS plus training? PLANET certifications are to suppose to be our standard for the industry.. Many also hold hort or landscape specialty certificates threw university extensions without having a degree.

StihlMechanic
11-04-2011, 08:35 PM
Almost all my LCO friends have a BS. One has a hort degree, one Music, and one Marketing. I am in a college town so its very common for LCO's here to have a degree. I was working on my BS in mechanical engineering and my wife will graduate in May with a BS in business administration.

MowingMowingMowing
11-04-2011, 11:42 PM
BS in Finance, minor in Entrepreneurship ... Graduating May 2012

MAD whacker
11-05-2011, 12:28 AM
i never finished HS i went to work and never looked back.

if i had more time i would go for electrical engineering but my time is pretty well spent on the life necessities ... family, business, and ME time , split something like this 50/45/5....:usflag:

MDLawn
11-05-2011, 07:39 PM
Did not see any Industry Training. I would think that falls into HS plus training? PLANET certifications are to suppose to be our standard for the industry.. Many also hold hort or landscape specialty certificates threw university extensions without having a degree.

Yes I would have thought that would fall into the HS + Training. The specialty certifications through a university should have been another category because those are the in between of HS+Training and Associates. There is a community college around here that offers such a certificate program. Good point!!
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MDLawn
11-05-2011, 10:26 PM
Interesting to see the current results showing only a handful of people with an actual degree in horticulture/construction, etc... But thats business owners though, come from all kinds of backgrounds! :usflag:

Gilmore.Landscaping
11-05-2011, 11:20 PM
wow, I would have hoped that more people had Landscape/hort education but it doesn't surprise me from some of the things I have seen.

GMLC
11-06-2011, 07:09 AM
BS Business Finance. Multiple certificates, classes, seminars and memberships in various landscaping organizations.
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jackal
11-06-2011, 07:44 AM
I have a BS along with various certificates of training in different fields. Even though you forget most of what you memorized in school, education is what remains. I wouln't trade my education for anything.

MDLawn
11-06-2011, 12:47 PM
wow, I would have hoped that more people had Landscape/hort education but it doesn't surprise me from some of the things I have seen.

Well as everyone says it's an easy entry business. However no schmuck is going to put together an amazing $10k+ hardscape/landscape. It's mainly the lawn and landscape maintenance which is probably most of the people involved with lawnsite. Being able to mow grass, edge beds, and apply mulch really doesn't require much knowledge, although some people really still have no clue. Plant ID, Disease ID, Design, is stuff that is learned through college or even classes.
Also maybe someone was interested in running a business and found a passion for landscaping but have a degree in business management or something else business related. This could be more important, in my opinion, that a hort degree. If you are smart in business you can hire someone with the knowledge or continue your education through college courses or seminar/trade educations. I mean c'mon the major complaints people make on here are about poor pricing and lack of business knowledge. The hardscape guys will rip apart any construction, which is good, but rarely do you see "Oh that plant should be trimmed this way", or "That plant doesnt go there", etc... It is said but mainly how to run a business is the problems most face, not identifying a plant or disease.



BS Business Finance. Multiple certificates, classes, seminars and memberships in various landscaping organizations.
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Pretty much what I said above. Got the business education to guide your business decisions and got the landscape knowledge through other means.



I have a BS along with various certificates of training in different fields. Even though you forget most of what you memorized in school, education is what remains. I wouln't trade my education for anything.

This statement is more important than most think. Yes most if not all of job training is being on the job and learning. However education can give you the foundations and not to mention a choice in case things go bad.


Thanks for voting in poll everyone! Keep it going!!

GreenI.A.
11-07-2011, 07:00 PM
Not sure why I added PhD's in this but ya never know.

There are plenty of guys with PHD's in this industry, most are either in the instruction end or manufacturing. The biggest compannies in my area the owners have their Masters in Busininess, most the other large companies (by large I mean the guys who could call Brickman or Valley Crest and sell the business to them the next day) the owner has atleast his Bachalers.

MDLawn
11-07-2011, 09:36 PM
I understand that PhD's will be in the field but I'm not so sure they belong to or take part in the ramblings on Lawnsite. The poll was more about the descriptions of business owners who use lawnsite.

MDLawn
11-08-2011, 09:15 AM
I think the trend this poll is taking is similar to any career field. People go to a college for a certain degree and find out it's just not what they want to do and move into something else. Wonder how many people have done a horticultural degree and end up in a completely different field. Now people with high levels of education such as doctors, surgeons, engineers, ect... probably remain in their field.

MDLawn
11-08-2011, 08:16 PM
Whoa a PhD!!!!! Nice!
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