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BlazerRidge
11-03-2011, 10:12 AM
I have a customer that is wanting a Honey locust planted now. I've tried to talk her out of it because I think it is a little to late to be planting now. We have had frosts for the past 4 days straight. If she won't wait then I'm going to make sure the tree has dropped all of its leaves and then plant it and make sure it is well mulched. Any other suggestions or tips? Also I'm in zone 6B

R & R Yard Designs
11-03-2011, 10:17 AM
why are you worried about planting it now
It's the best time to do it.we plant until the ground is frozen
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JB1
11-03-2011, 10:18 AM
plant away.

BlazerRidge
11-03-2011, 10:22 AM
We are getting some pretty good freezes and I wasn't sure how a young tree would handle that.

BlazerRidge
11-03-2011, 10:25 AM
Sugar maple good to go also?

JB1
11-03-2011, 10:43 AM
Sugar maple good to go also?



anyone of them is.

Leo the Landscaper
11-05-2011, 01:20 PM
I have a customer that is wanting a Honey locust planted now. I've tried to talk her out of it because I think it is a little to late to be planting now. We have had frosts for the past 4 days straight. If she won't wait then I'm going to make sure the tree has dropped all of its leaves and then plant it and make sure it is well mulched. Any other suggestions or tips? Also I'm in zone 6B

I suggest you leave the planting to someone else, based on the lack of knowledge you have displayed in your post. Please, do not take offence to this but you seem to lack some very basic information regarding planting.

fireman gus
11-05-2011, 02:59 PM
I have planted several trees in that area this time of year and had good luck with each of them. I have a friend that lives outside Knoxville that I visit this time of year and we do all sorts of work like trees, shrubs, etc. Plant away.

agrostis
11-05-2011, 03:58 PM
When it comes to planting tree's, the colder it is the better the chance of a tree's survival. Newly planted tree's need a lot of water, even in winter.

integrityman
11-05-2011, 09:00 PM
I suggest you leave the planting to someone else, based on the lack of knowledge you have displayed in your post. Please, do not take offence to this but you seem to lack some very basic information regarding planting.

I had the same thought intitially too.

But this guy has to learn too.

This is an IDEAL time to plants trees. Some would suggest that certain trees like buckeye trees, magnolias etc with fleshy roots do better with spring planting.

Either way Blazer, take the time to read and educate yourself with tree and shrub planting. It WILL be well worth your while.

Leo the Landscaper
11-05-2011, 09:23 PM
I had the same thought intitially too.

But this guy has to learn too.

This is an IDEAL time to plants trees. Some would suggest that certain trees like buckeye trees, magnolias etc with fleshy roots do better with spring planting.

Either way Blazer, take the time to read and educate yourself with tree and shrub planting. It WILL be well worth your while.

Yes, maybe I was to harsh. I don't want to discourage anyone from improving themselves.

Blazer hang in there. I suggest finding a local community college with a landscape program and take a class. Or some seminars put on by professional organizations. Personally, I feel the seminars and educational opportunities put on by the International Society of Arboriculture are the most comprehensive. Seek out your local extension agent too.

Cloud9Landscapes
11-06-2011, 12:27 AM
I would advise piling a 3 or 4 inch layer of mulch all around the root zone of the tree you planted to insulate the roots. Apply a fertilizer rich in P and K to promote root growth. Most importantly, amend the soil with organic matter like compost.

Smallaxe
11-06-2011, 07:24 AM
Always plant with a 'basin' around the roozone that can be flooded and let the ground settle into the individual roots while at the same time eliminating air pockets, by flooding... 3 days of flooding should settle the tree in nicely... avoid excessive heat and frozen ground, otherwise almostany time for t-plant is fine...

That is really all the education you need about planting almost everything... I shoot for 100% survival rate on EVERY job.... most of the time I get it... :)

Leo the Landscaper
11-06-2011, 08:26 AM
I would advise piling a 3 or 4 inch layer of mulch all around the root zone of the tree you planted to insulate the roots. Apply a fertilizer rich in P and K to promote root growth. Most importantly, amend the soil with organic matter like compost.

I would not use the term "piling" when describing the application of mulch. But rather spread a 3-4 inch layer of mulch over the drip-line of a newly planted tree. If the tree has a narrow or upright crown I would suggest going beyond the drip-line. It goes without saying keep mulch away from trunk

Only apply fertilizer if necessary. If one determines fertilizer is necessary do not apply quick release forms but rather organic forms or slow release synthetic.

It is widely understood, by those that plant trees properly, that amending the back-fill soil when planting a tree is not recommended. It can have severe negative effects, the one I will describe here is related to water movement. If you amend and improve the texture of the planting back-fill with organic amendment, like compost, the improvement created in porosity in the immediate planting hole will be at odds with the surrounding existing soil. The surrounding soil can actually pull moisture out of the amended soil thus drying the newly planted tree out. There are other negative effects as well.

There are of course exceptions, for example planting a tree in a tree well that is constructed of concrete and one can amend the entire amount of soil that will be exploited by the tree. Or if one is constructing a entirely new bed that the tree will be planted in, in this case you will be amending a large area.

If a tree will be planted in isolation the back-fill should not be amended.

integrityman
11-06-2011, 10:23 AM
I would advise piling a 3 or 4 inch layer of mulch all around the root zone of the tree you planted to insulate the roots. Apply a fertilizer rich in P and K to promote root growth. Most importantly, amend the soil with organic matter like compost.

A little soil ammendment is ok......but not too much.

A little 12-12-12 or Tree Tone is good......but not too much.


Some root stimulant is somethong that I always use to.

integrityman
11-06-2011, 10:27 AM
Always plant with a 'basin' around the roozone that can be flooded and let the ground settle into the individual roots while at the same time eliminating air pockets, by flooding... 3 days of flooding should settle the tree in nicely... avoid excessive heat and frozen ground, otherwise almostany time for t-plant is fine...

That is really all the education you need about planting almost everything... I shoot for 100% survival rate on EVERY job.... most of the time I get it... :)

As many trees are grafted, you need to be carefull NOT to place the graft below the soil level.

Then I see work some guys do that just amazes me.

They leave the ball 6" above the soil or create huge mulch volcanoes and wonder why the tree fails to thrive.

BlazerRidge
11-06-2011, 01:23 PM
Thanks for the responses guys. I generally try to stay away from planting but this a good customer of mine and she wanted us to plant it even though I told her I wasn't comfortable planting it this late because I didnt know how it would do. I work more with lawn maintenance. I actually work with the University of Tennessee Turfgrass research when I'm here at school so I know a lot more about grass then I do landscape plants.

PR Fect
11-07-2011, 06:49 PM
[QUOTE=Smallaxe;4207268]Always plant with a 'basin' around the roozone that can be flooded and let the ground settle into the individual roots while at the same time eliminating air pockets, by flooding... 3 days of flooding should settle the tree in nicely... avoid excessive heat and frozen ground, QUOTE]

Trees planted in the fall should not be kept moist but not saturated until freezing weather occurs. You did say you had frost. But you may want to wait a wile longer before you "flood".

BlazerRidge
11-13-2011, 09:00 PM
Yeah we are getting quite a few frosts. Soil temps are down around 45-50 right now