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slemon
11-03-2011, 10:56 PM
So I was calling around to have somebody blow out my system. I decided to ask some 'control' questions to make sure they don't blow with 100 PSI pressure. I asked one guy about the size of compressor he uses. He seemed quite offended. Is it a tabu to ask about equipment you guys use?

mitchgo
11-03-2011, 11:03 PM
why would it be?

It's a business and you are paying for a service. You get the right to know what goings on.

If someone asked me .. I probably wouldn't get technical... Since we have 185 cfm compressors I just say this baby can handle golf fields

If it was smaller I would probably just say it handles all residential systems .

Wet_Boots
11-03-2011, 11:03 PM
it is a completely irrelevant question - you are not competent to vet anything by way of the telephone, when it comes to winterizing a system

Just the same, call every number in the phone book listings for lawn sprinklers, and ask for details about what compressors they use - report back and let us know how it goes

mitchgo
11-03-2011, 11:08 PM
it is a completely irrelevant question - you are not competent to vet anything by way of the telephone, when it comes to winterizing a systems

How do you figure that?

What if this dude uses a pancake compressor and charges the main line at 125 psi.. Turns on the zone then recharges?

Good have some knowledge of what's going on.


To the OP . Just use angies list companies with good ratings so you don't worry too much

FIMCO-MEISTER
11-03-2011, 11:11 PM
I've seen compressor size bragging on this site enough to know its a totally legitimate question for a chick to ask.

DanaMac
11-03-2011, 11:20 PM
We have plenty of systems here that are set up with 100+ psi when operating. IF DONE PROPERLY, 100 psi is not a problem. I never enter air into the system without 1-3 zones going at once. I never fill a mainline without something open.
I don't recommend it at 100 psi, but it's all in how you work the equipment.

it wouldn't bother me if someone asked, but really, how many consumers really know what they are asking in this area? Your original post answers this for me. You are worried about entering 100 psi into the system, but want to know what size compressor the guy has. I can have the biggest compressor made, but I can regulate the pressure down to whatever I want. I can also have a tiny pancake compressor and build up 150 psi, and it won't hurt a darn thing.

Wet_Boots
11-03-2011, 11:22 PM
I can clear a multi-acre estate with a truck-mount dinky, if it came to it. The issue is whether all the water is blown out, and if the system is in good shape following the procedure.

Here is a general question - what is the one and only optimal air pressure for blowing out a system?

DanaMac
11-03-2011, 11:27 PM
Here is a general question - what is the one and only optimal air pressure for blowing out a system?

Not sure. On residentials, I tend to keep mine at 60 psi, but my regulator is accessible and easily adjustable. if the system I am on is struggling, I will increase it a little at a time.

mitchgo
11-03-2011, 11:32 PM
Not sure. On residentials, I tend to keep mine at 60 psi, but my regulator is accessible and easily adjustable. if the system I am on is struggling, I will increase it a little at a time.

same here.

Wet_Boots
11-03-2011, 11:32 PM
Not sure. On residentials, I tend to keep mine at 60 psi, but my regulator is accessible and easily adjustable. if the system I am on is struggling, I will increase it a little at a time.If a pro can't provide a number, then what does Joe Shlabotnik know about the process?

DanaMac
11-03-2011, 11:34 PM
If a pro can't provide a number, then what does Joe Shlabotnik know about the process?

Yep. I don't think there is a correct number.

slemon
11-03-2011, 11:34 PM
it is a completely irrelevant question
It's more than relevant. I want to know beforehand if the guy knows what he is doing. Just because his name is in Yellow Pages doesn't mean he's competent.
I am not that clueless.

I called several companies and most of them didn't mind questioning.


What if this dude uses a pancake compressor and charges the main line at 125 psi.. Turns on the zone then recharges?

Good have some knowledge of what's going on.
What he said.

Wet_Boots
11-03-2011, 11:44 PM
It's more than relevant. I want to know beforehand if the guy knows what he is doing. Just because his name is in Yellow Pages doesn't mean he's competent.
I am not that clueless.

I called several companies and most of them didn't mind questioning.



What he said.I still don't buy your assertion that you have the slightest clue about winterizing, if you actually believe the compressors' capacities affect the results.

More to the point, why are you not using the winterizing service you employed last year?

Stuttering Stan
11-03-2011, 11:46 PM
I don't mind being asked that question but I would wonder why. What difference does it make the size tools that I use? Do you ask your Dr what kind of stethoscope he uses.................

slemon
11-03-2011, 11:51 PM
I still don't buy your assertion that you have the slightest clue about winterizing, if you actually believe the compressors' capacities affect the results.

More to the point, why are you not using the winterizing service you employed last year?
because I just put in sprinkler system this year. Yes, it's DIY. (Oh wait for bashing comments in that regard).

About clue. I tried 20 Gallon, 6 SCFM one just for experience and that didn't work well.

Kiril
11-03-2011, 11:52 PM
I can clear a multi-acre estate with a truck-mount dinky, if it came to it. The issue is whether all the water is blown out, and if the system is in good shape following the procedure.

You don't believe putting a system under high pressure is going to shorten the life of the system?

slemon
11-03-2011, 11:53 PM
I don't mind being asked that question but I would wonder why. What difference does it make the size tools that I use? Do you ask your Dr what kind of stethoscope he uses.................
You SHOULD ask your doctor questions (working in medical field)

FIMCO-MEISTER
11-03-2011, 11:56 PM
I still don't buy your assertion that you have the slightest clue about winterizing, if you actually believe the compressors' capacities affect the results.

More to the point, why are you not using the winterizing service you employed last year?

I think he has a clue or he wouldn't be asking the question.

Wet_Boots
11-03-2011, 11:56 PM
You don't believe putting a system under high pressure is going to shorten the life of the system?Exactly what air pressure are you thinking my post referred to?

Kiril
11-03-2011, 11:59 PM
Exactly what air pressure are you thinking my post referred to?

Don't answer a question with a question.

Wet_Boots
11-04-2011, 12:01 AM
because I just put in sprinkler system this year. Yes, it's DIY. (Oh wait for bashing comments in that regard).

About clue. I tried 20 Gallon, 6 SCFM one just for experience and that didn't work well.You clearly have no clue. Zero. Zip. Nada. I could take a Home Depot craptastic compressor on a 20 gal tank and clear the system you installed, no problem, and no water remaining.

Stop bothering the grown-ups :realmad:

slemon
11-04-2011, 12:07 AM
OK, grown up...

DanaMac
11-04-2011, 12:09 AM
High pressure for a 10-40 minute job once a year is not going to shorten the life of a system. It's not going to be 100 static. With multiple zones operating pressure at the heads might be 50-60. Of course that is higher than optimal operating pressure, but for how long it would be operating, its not a big deal.
Posted via Mobile Device

Kiril
11-04-2011, 12:11 AM
High pressure for a 10-40 minute job once a year is not going to shorten the life of a system.

Does water hammer shorten the life of a system? That is also a transient pressure.

Wet_Boots
11-04-2011, 12:31 AM
blah blah blahJust how many systems have you ever winterized, Magnet Boy? :)

http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/1801/magnetboy2.gif

Kiril
11-04-2011, 12:34 AM
I could winterize your irrigation system with the hot air coming from my mouth

Hmmmmmmmmm ..... what does the question have anything to do with winterizing? It is a question of pressure and stresses/forces on system components.

slemon
11-04-2011, 01:16 AM
Is charging mainline with about 40 PSI of air and then opening zone valve not recommended procedure?

AI Inc
11-04-2011, 06:39 AM
Is charging mainline with about 40 PSI of air and then opening zone valve not recommended procedure?

Its all about CFM,s

DanaMac
11-04-2011, 08:38 AM
Is charging mainline with about 40 PSI of air and then opening zone valve not recommended procedure?

Never heard of it done that way.You should not try to pressurize the mainline as if it were a tank. You need CFMs, as AI said. Your compressor needs to be able to be able to keep up with constant demand. I can blow out a system with 30 psi from my large 185 cfm towable compressor, but 60 psi on a small home air compressor will not keep up with the demand needed. It cannot create the amount of air, that is constantly leaving the sprinkler heads. Basically - more air is leaving the system than what the comp can generate.

slemon
11-04-2011, 03:04 PM
I've read it somewhere but everybody else says not to.

Mike Leary
11-04-2011, 09:32 PM
Never heard of it done that way.You should not try to pressurize the mainline as if it were a tank. You need CFMs, as AI said. Your compressor needs to be able to be able to keep up with constant demand. I can blow out a system with 30 psi from my large 185 cfm towable compressor, but 60 psi on a small home air compressor will not keep up with the demand needed. It cannot create the amount of air, that is constantly leaving the sprinkler heads. Basically - more air is leaving the system than what the comp can generate.

All I know after a (few) years, is we fired the compressor, let it build-up, fired a zone the farthest away, opened the ball valve on the compressor to clear the mainline so the compressor would have less work and air the system. Our 125 would get to the pont where it was just chugging along, putting out the CFM without a whole lot of pressure. Worked for us. :clapping:

irritation
11-04-2011, 09:38 PM
That's not right but your area has such a shallow freeze depth it really doesn't matter. Just drain the above ground backflows and you should be fine.

rlpsystems
11-04-2011, 09:56 PM
mine is 185 cfm ....pumping at 80 psi.....

mitchgo
11-04-2011, 10:04 PM
I don't see how you can do that properly boots..

I mean.. it's a home depot system right.. So home depot heads..

If you have a charge main line at 100 psi and then turn on a zone.. You're going to blow the effing heads apart.. Then who looks like an idiot.

It should be widely known that you are gearing for less pressure- more volume.

Mdirrigation
11-04-2011, 10:10 PM
I have pressure set to 85 psi on all my compressors , works fine in all but a few large systems where I bump it up to 100 psi . Cfm ranges from 80 to 125 depending on the machine . My safety feature is I set my pressure relief valve to 110 lbs , it blows off at 110 and closes at 75 psi . If a customer starts asking all those questions on the phone they are usually the competition not a customer

mitchgo
11-04-2011, 10:12 PM
I typically try to keep mine at 65 psi. Sometimes you just gotta bump it up though

85 has a good probability of blowing the tops of heads

irritation
11-04-2011, 10:21 PM
Mine won't go below about 65 psi and I keep it about 70. Some large systems require cranking it up and a couple large commercials need it wide open which is about 130 max.

Mdirrigation
11-04-2011, 10:30 PM
I typically try to keep mine at 65 psi. Sometimes you just gotta bump it up though

85 has a good probability of blowing the tops of heads

Well I have been doing this since 1981 , that has happened maybe 3 times in 30 years , so the probability is pretty low .

slemon
11-04-2011, 10:37 PM
Well I have been doing this since 1981 , that has happened maybe 3 times in 30 years , so the probability is pretty low .

Do your customers replace sprinkler heads often?

Mdirrigation
11-04-2011, 10:55 PM
Well we replace a lot of Hunter heads thru the season . Bad seals . About 40 % of the systems around here are running off 80 psi to 90 psi city water pressure . 85 psi on the compressor is well within the safe zone for blow outs . The pressure at the compressor is always much higher than the pressure at the heads due to friction loss thru 150 foot of 5/8 hose and then the system piping , you will only get 55 to 65 psi at the heads . Pop a head and put a pressure gauge on one time and you will see . You wont blow heads .

DanaMac
11-04-2011, 11:02 PM
I'd the head is going to blow off, there was mist likely a problem with the head or connecting fitting underneath anyway. As MD said, there will not be 100 PSI at the heads if you start with 100 psi. I have systems that operate at 125 psi at the source.
Posted via Mobile Device

Wet_Boots
11-04-2011, 11:44 PM
I don't see how you can do that properly boots..

I mean.. it's a home depot system right.. So home depot heads..

If you have a charge main line at 100 psi and then turn on a zone.. You're going to blow the effing heads apart.. Then who looks like an idiot.

It should be widely known that you are gearing for less pressure- more volume.Why charge anything at such high pressure? 60 psi is fine. Lather, rinse, repeat.

jcom
11-07-2011, 10:26 AM
Are you figuring pressure loss through the hose when you regulate?

Juan

irritation
11-07-2011, 09:13 PM
I'd the head is going to blow off, there was mist likely a problem
Posted via Mobile Device

:laugh::drinkup:

DanaMac
11-07-2011, 09:17 PM
:laugh::drinkup:

Yup. That's what happens when you reply from your smartphone while sitting on the can.......

irritation
11-07-2011, 09:26 PM
I crap like clockwork every morning. Only sit down to piss when I'm too wasted to stand.