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jbell36
11-17-2011, 03:33 PM
when do you guys trim hedges/perennial bushes? i was talking to a lady at the greenhouse and she said that trimming going into winter is questionable because we don't know how cold of a winter we are going to get...do most of you trim early spring before they bud?

metro36
11-17-2011, 07:12 PM
On my full service accounts they get done three times a year: late March- early April, mid June and mid September. Most other customers want them done in the spring and early summer, but I will do them pretty much when ever they want. If I think it is best not to trim at the time, I will try to advise them of a better time.

bobcat48
11-17-2011, 08:11 PM
I have customers who want it for two i think that is fine i do bushes/trees not the tall ones that you use a pole pruner but with hedger and my 6' ladder my 24'' trimmer is fine and the ladder 6'' works great for all types.A trim usually in early/mid summer and one in sept around fall,i dont do it early since the growth wait till pretty much that is done.i have a guy who does pruning for the tall stuff like bradford pears and trimming parkway trees that i refer for them if they would like he is a echo pole saw.

Kate Butler
11-17-2011, 09:53 PM
when do you guys trim hedges/perennial bushes? i was talking to a lady at the greenhouse and she said that trimming going into winter is questionable because we don't know how cold of a winter we are going to get...do most of you trim early spring before they bud?

It depends on the plant. There is no such thing as a perennial bush. There are perennials and there are shrubs. You need to know the difference before you begin to prune. For instance lilacs should be pruned after they bloom.

944own
11-18-2011, 04:13 PM
he is a echo pole saw.

:confused:

bobcat48
11-18-2011, 06:31 PM
:confused:

Sorry Has?

RGM
11-18-2011, 06:36 PM
1-3 times a year depending on the shrub and the customer

Leo the Landscaper
11-18-2011, 07:47 PM
It depends on the plant. There is no such thing as a perennial bush. There are perennials and there are shrubs. You need to know the difference before you begin to prune. For instance lilacs should be pruned after they bloom.

There are such things as perennial bushes. In fact most plants considered a bush are perennials. Trees are perennials.

There are optimal times for pruning certain plants. I cant list them all here but you should know what you are pruning first then research the plant and determine the best time to prune. A general rule: Bushes that bloom in spring, before June, should be pruned after they flower as flowers bud are present in late summer/fall. Bushes that bloom after June 1 can be pruned in spring before flush.

Your original question regarding pruning late is a valid concern. Often you can get freeze damage on the ends of recently trimmed branches, if trimmed too late and cold weather sets in.

Kate Butler
11-19-2011, 11:04 AM
[QUOTE=Leo the Landscaper;4219431]There are such things as perennial bushes. In fact most plants considered a bush are perennials. Trees are perennials.

Sorry, I must disagree: perennials (by definition) are vascular plants that do NOT return and regrow from the previous year's growth. They die to the ground and return completely new the following season. (Except in the tropics - that's another, different discussion.) This is the reason that it is best to cut perennial plants to the ground in the Fall and remove the debris so that the new growth will come unimpeded in the Spring.

Trees and shrubs are woody plants that sprout new growth from old wood the following season and increase in size in that way.

Leo the Landscaper
11-19-2011, 11:51 AM
[QUOTE=Leo the Landscaper;4219431]There are such things as perennial bushes. In fact most plants considered a bush are perennials. Trees are perennials.

Sorry, I must disagree: perennials (by definition) are vascular plants that do NOT return and regrow from the previous year's growth. They die to the ground and return completely new the following season. (Except in the tropics - that's another, different discussion.) This is the reason that it is best to cut perennial plants to the ground in the Fall and remove the debris so that the new growth will come unimpeded in the Spring.

Trees and shrubs are woody plants that sprout new growth from old wood the following season and increase in size in that way.

I understand why you are disagreeing with me but you should preface the word perennial with the word herbaceous to be correct in the way you are using it.

A perennial by definition is a plant that continues to live regardless of when it flowers as opposed to annuals (germinate, flower, seed in one year) and biennials (germinate flower, seed over two years). It has nothing to do with weather or not it dies to the ground or not. It has to do with life cycle in relation to flowering.

Trees and bushes are perennials, more specifically woody perennials, but they are perennials.

The blanket statement that perennials plants should be cut back in the fall is not 100% true. Most herbaceous perennials should be cut back in the fall, I agree. What about plants like Russian Sage, Buddleia sp, some Artemisias, lavenders, Hypericum and others; these are plants considered to be herbaceous perennials, depending on location, but should be cut back in spring.

One should be able to properly identify the plants they are trimming and research when it is best to prune/trim them.

Grassmaster9
11-22-2011, 12:10 AM
Any bush that flowers should be trimmed as soon as they are done flowering. Trimming them too late can prevent them from blooming the next year, especially lilacs. I've always believed the best time to trim bushes is late Spring/early Summer but I get calls all season long from people wanting bush trimming, even in the Fall. I explain my opinion but will trim when requested, otherwise they would just call somebody else to do the job.

ralph02813
11-24-2011, 08:42 AM
I general trim hedges and bushes 3 times spring summer and fall, for most I find it easier to keep a nice clean line if its done often, and they never looked trimmed its the look both my customers and I like.
Having said that, I totally agree with Kate and Leo - takes some time to id all your bushes on a particular property - cause there are bushes like lilacs that can be pretty shakey, if you cut them back too much they will take revenge and skip a year of bloom, I give them a week after the flowers have bloomed and wilted, then I am very selective. I learned this after cut 50% of the growth off my patch of lilacs it took me two years of begging before they fllowered again. LOL

ArenaLandscaping
11-24-2011, 09:18 AM
There is no such thing as a perennial bush.

:confused:Hydrangea,Butterfly Bush.............http://www.google.com/search?q=perennial+bush&hl=en&rlz=1C2GPCK_enUS368&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=KUDOTtKLMouCsgKuppWyDg&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&ved=0CCkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1366&bih=643


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perennial_plant

A perennial plant or simply perennial (Latin per, "through", annus, "year") is a plant that lives for more than two years.[1] The term is often used to differentiate a plant from shorter lived annuals and biennials.The term is sometimes misused by commercial gardeners or horticulturalists to describe only herbaceous perennials. More correctly, woody plants like shrubs and trees are also perennials.

Perennials, especially small flowering plants, grow and bloom over the spring and summer and then die back every autumn and winter, then return in the spring from their root-stock rather than seeding themselves as an annual plant does. These are known as herbaceous perennials. However, depending on the rigors of local climate, a plant that is a perennial in its native habitat, or in a milder garden, may be treated by a gardener as an annual and planted out every year, from seed, from cuttings or from divisions.