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Keegan
11-29-2011, 09:12 PM
When is a good time to start dormant seeding?

grassman177
11-30-2011, 08:06 AM
when ground temps are below 50 degrees and going to stay there

RigglePLC
11-30-2011, 10:20 AM
Last year, seed sown on top of snow in February, for a test, came up about April 8th, in Michigan.

So...I am planning to try the test again this year. I have started to plant seed outdoors in containers every month. I checked the results so far, a few minutes ago. Oddly, seed planted on October 29th came up, and the tallest sprout is about one-inch tall. 31 days to sprout. Temperatures have been average, several frosts, a half-inch of snow that lasted for a few hours. It is 38 degrees at the moment. Seed used was Scotts "Classic" which is about 30 percent per rye.

It is possible that seeding in late March would work just as well. I will see what happens in spring.

Edit ...soil temp is 35.

31bro
11-30-2011, 10:28 AM
When you talk about dormant seeding, do you guys just spread the seed and fertilizer or do you still slit seed or aerate? What is the best option?

Smallaxe
11-30-2011, 11:07 AM
When you talk about dormant seeding, do you guys just spread the seed and fertilizer or do you still slit seed or aerate? What is the best option?

Bare ground bubbles and heaves during the freeze/thaw cycle. Grass seed is of such a design as to 'plant itself' under such conditions.

You can observe this for yourself by placing seed out in open soil and check it throughout the winter, and seed what comes up in the Spring... :)

fl-landscapes
11-30-2011, 11:27 AM
When you talk about dormant seeding, do you guys just spread the seed and fertilizer or do you still slit seed or aerate? What is the best option?

Skip the fertilizer if its a true dormant situation as it will not be utilized by dormant turf and will volitize off or leach away before new seedlings emerge in the spring
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CHARLES CUE
11-30-2011, 08:36 PM
Last year, seed sown on top of snow in February, for a test, came up about April 8th, in Michigan.

So...I am planning to try the test again this year. I have started to plant seed outdoors in containers every month. I checked the results so far, a few minutes ago. Oddly, seed planted on October 29th came up, and the tallest sprout is about one-inch tall. 31 days to sprout. Temperatures have been average, several frosts, a half-inch of snow that lasted for a few hours. It is 38 degrees at the moment. Seed used was Scotts "Classic" which is about 30 percent per rye.

It is possible that seeding in late March would work just as well. I will see what happens in spring.

Edit ...soil temp is 35.

I like to wait till march It's been warm here Easter lily's are up about a inch and thats on a north facing slope no sun at all

Charles Cue

phasthound
12-01-2011, 11:32 AM
Skip the fertilizer if its a true dormant situation as it will not be utilized by dormant turf and will volitize off or leach away before new seedlings emerge in the spring
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I don't know about down south, but up north the practice of applying fert as grass goes dormant is probably the largest source of nutrient runoff into our waters caused by lawn fert.

Most nutrient runoff is cause by erosion, agriculture and other sources.

Good sound fert applications add few nutrients to our waters, in spite of what many may believe. If you want to give the lawn care industry a black eye, apply fert to cool season turf now. :nono:

fl-landscapes
12-01-2011, 11:48 AM
[ living in ma most of my life I was referring to cool season grass. If I read this correctly you were agreeing with me to not fertilize if the turf is truly dormant?


QUOTE=phasthound;4231743]I don't know about down south, but up north the practice of applying fert as grass goes dormant is probably the largest source of nutrient runoff into our waters caused by lawn fert.

Most nutrient runoff is cause by erosion, agriculture and other sources.

Good sound fert applications add few nutrients to our waters, in spite of what many may believe. If you want to give the lawn care industry a black eye, apply fert to cool season turf now. :nono:[/QUOTE]
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phasthound
12-01-2011, 12:04 PM
Yes, I am agreeing with you about late fert applications being a nono for cool season turf.
BTW, my wife would kill to move back to MA. :)

fl-landscapes
12-01-2011, 03:12 PM
Yes, I am agreeing with you about late fert applications being a nono for cool season turf.
BTW, my wife would kill to move back to MA. :)

I miss it a lot there too. Be back for Christmas. What part of ma is she from? I am from the south shore by Plymouth small town called hull
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phasthound
12-01-2011, 06:08 PM
I miss it a lot there too. Be back for Christmas. What part of ma is she from? I am from the south shore by Plymouth small town called hull
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After she graduated from BC, she lived in Acton & Hudson.

fl-landscapes
12-01-2011, 06:14 PM
After she graduated from BC, she lived in Acton & Hudson.

BC is a great school. We use to play acton boxborough in high school sports. Lot more snow out there near 495 than we ever got on the coast but it's a nice area
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Keegan
12-18-2011, 07:46 AM
Barry- I would kill to go back to Jersey. My wife is from CT. :(