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lukemelo216
11-29-2011, 10:54 PM
So I have a HOA client that is having some issues with its residence breaking the door off the controller, accessing it and changing the settings on the controller. They are pulling the little side pins out on the door and then they just pop it off.

So I was talking with the rep for the HOA and he wants to put some sort of lock box or something over it that will enclose the controller that we can put a few padlocks on and keep it sealed. Anyone ever see anything like this?

The controller is about 1 ft off the ground and is on a wooden post (probably a 6x8 or soemthing like that.) Im seeing limited stuff on line, and the one I thought would work is 1000$ and I know that is out of budget.

greenmonster304
11-29-2011, 11:04 PM
I have seen people make wooden enclosers or you could have a local metal shop fab you somthing.
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lukemelo216
11-29-2011, 11:07 PM
yeah im sure the fabricating something is going to have to be the option we take.

DanaMac
11-30-2011, 08:46 AM
Is it just sitting on a post? If it's against a wall, there are cages for them. I have one of these around a 3/4" PVB next to a wall. I have an extra one sitting in the shop, if interested.
http://www.guardshackenclosures.com/products/clockguard/

Sprinkus
11-30-2011, 09:22 AM
An electrical junction box like this (http://www.milbankmfg.com/Products/Catalogs/CatalogFiles/PDF/QuickSelector/CIPC_HC3R.pdf) ought to work.
Check with the local electrical supply company.
I've also seen galvanized junction boxes used for this purpose.

Wet_Boots
11-30-2011, 09:44 AM
Electrical supply houses can get what you need.

FIMCO-MEISTER
11-30-2011, 11:56 AM
How about a Ridgid job site storage unit turned sideways? My out of the box thinking solution. Plus it would make a good pic for FAILBLOG.

Mike Leary
11-30-2011, 12:03 PM
Buy a clock with access codes built-in. :)

DanaMac
11-30-2011, 12:14 PM
How about a Ridgid job site storage unit turned sideways? My out of the box thinking solution. Plus it would make a good pic for FAILBLOG.

I know local companies that are doing this for backflow preventers on commercial and HOA sites. They are sanding down and either painting or powder coating them gray to look like electric boxes, since the theves have been breaking or stealing backflow cages.

Tbone77
11-30-2011, 01:22 PM
Sounds like these are plastic controllers? How many zones? How about just swapping it out with a metal locking controller? That or VIT Strong box makes some pretty solid controller boxes you can mount them in. There website is pretty bad and doesn't really show detail very well...

http://www.vitproducts.com/download/catalog/01_controller_enclosure_guide.pdf

Sprinkus
11-30-2011, 05:10 PM
If the controller is fairly small then Home Depot has some outdoor enclosure boxes (http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202590856/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053) that can be locked.

GreenI.A.
11-30-2011, 08:02 PM
I saw one on a commercial site that was installed in a locking metal box. It looked simular to a large wall mount metal first aid kit but had a pad lock on it. I would think you should be able to find something like that fairly cheap

Mike Leary
11-30-2011, 08:40 PM
We've gotten into that mess many times, where the tenant at site #102 thought that he/she was not getting enough irrigation.Most usually it was (A) a crummy install, or (B), most often, they'd changed the original layout with pots, plantings, etc. We always told the "board" it was up to the tenant to pay for the modifications, though, in most cases, there was no spare wire or mainline nearby. That's how hubby gets sent to the clock to adjust what cannot be adjusted and floods the f**k out of the area. :hammerhead:

Irrigation Contractor
11-30-2011, 08:45 PM
Is it just sitting on a post? If it's against a wall, there are cages for them. I have one of these around a 3/4" PVB next to a wall. I have an extra one sitting in the shop, if interested.
http://www.guardshackenclosures.com/products/clockguard/

This is what we use too.

Mike Leary
11-30-2011, 08:51 PM
Trust me, they will demand a key and keep screwing with the clock unless you sit them down and explain the reality of the system.

Irrigation Contractor
11-30-2011, 08:58 PM
Trust me, they will demand a key and keep screwing with the clock unless you sit them down and explain the reality of the system.

You are right when it comes to an HOA. We use these mainly on commercial jobs. Most managers could care less about the irrigation......now, lets say you have a maintenance man at an apartment complex? We all know that is a whole different story, because they know everything:)

Mike Leary
11-30-2011, 09:12 PM
You are right when it comes to an HOA, they know everything:)

They are all retired experts, at least they sure pontificate their "expertise". I always told my guys to bail if there ever became a forum of "stand-arounds", because, sure as hell, I'd have problems with billing.

lukemelo216
11-30-2011, 09:43 PM
The HOA president wants me to put a lock on it so then it can keep people out. More or less what was happening was one of the residence was walking his dog one morning and couldnt walk down the path so he broke open the unit and adjustd it. The president was not happy and more or less said, just do what you need to do to keep people out.

lukemelo216
11-30-2011, 09:50 PM
Is it just sitting on a post? If it's against a wall, there are cages for them. I have one of these around a 3/4" PVB next to a wall. I have an extra one sitting in the shop, if interested.
http://www.guardshackenclosures.com/products/clockguard/

I like this. Im assuming it should work, just need to get the specs off the controller and its pretty cost effective, and should run roughly just as much as building/fabricating a box. The box is actually on a wooden post, but I think it will still work.

Kiril
11-30-2011, 09:50 PM
The HOA president wants me to put a lock on it so then it can keep people out. More or less what was happening was one of the residence was walking his dog one morning and couldnt walk down the path so he broke open the unit and adjustd it. The president was not happy and more or less said, just do what you need to do to keep people out.

Not to excuse the idiot adjusting the controller, but why is the path being irrigated? Fix the irrigation!

txirrigation
12-01-2011, 05:57 PM
Where I am you can water across sidewalks on commercial/golf course/recreation properties. Reason being they do not want rows of heads next to the side walk to get busted by every kid on a bike, or mom with a stroller.

greenmonster304
12-02-2011, 08:58 AM
Not to excuse the idiot adjusting the controller, but why is the path being irrigated? Fix the irrigation!

what if is like the path pictured below?

Wet_Boots
12-02-2011, 09:10 AM
use midgets with watering cans

Kiril
12-02-2011, 10:16 AM
what if is like the path pictured below?

Either use SDI, or schedule your irrigation when people aren't walking their dogs.

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-02-2011, 10:53 AM
I know from first hand experience that trying to keep the water tight on a parkway leads to more service calls on damaged heads. The clay shrinks and swells more right at the curb and sidewalk. So the heads get cockeyed or whacked by the edger. My own approach was to find a balance between good coverage with little waste and as few heads as possible. I preferred end strips and center strips. Yes the edge in spots browned a little during heat spells but the minimum waste and fewer repairs made it livable.

lukemelo216
12-02-2011, 07:37 PM
I dont know how he was getting wet. If it was windy or something or if there was a bad head. When I tested the system before we blew it out, everything was running fine. No heads were watering the path. Part of the problem is that the home owner tried to reset the times that everything got watered and he ended starting each zone twice a day, once in the mid morning (from like 5am-10am) and again late at night (10pm-2am or something like that, and everything was just soaking wet. Then he all together turned the box off during the middle of the summer and about 2 weeks later the lawn was fried.

Mike Leary
12-02-2011, 08:20 PM
I dont know how he was getting wet. If it was windy or something or if there was a bad head. When I tested the system before we blew it out, everything was running fine. No heads were watering the path. Part of the problem is that the home owner tried to reset the times that everything got watered and he ended starting each zone twice a day, once in the mid morning (from like 5am-10am) and again late at night (10pm-2am or something like that, and everything was just soaking wet. Then he all together turned the box off during the middle of the summer and about 2 weeks later the lawn was fried.

Idiots have no right to access a clock, a competent shoe salesman should be able to convince hubby to keep his grimy paws off the clock and let the pro adjust as needed. Or, as I have done many times (at the urging of the better half), faked a clock failure and replaced it with a clock that had "anti-hubby" features. The Irritrol "Touch Command" put a end to most HO dinking around problems. :clapping: