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View Full Version : Got new customer, She needs advice on this Rose. ASAP.


soloscaperman
12-08-2011, 07:53 PM
I know one of them needs a stake and rope but do you cut these down almost half way? Should I just dead head it? Not sure if the customer wants more little roses or prune them so there are less but larger ones. What kind of winter maintence on these?

Are they Western wild Rose, scotch Rose, or Red leaf Rose??? The state it's grown is CT.

soloscaperman
12-08-2011, 07:59 PM
Here are some of the pictures using my crappy Blackberry phone.

ed2hess
12-08-2011, 08:14 PM
Aren't you up north? Well roses get pruned in Feb in our area, until then we leave them alone. And dead heading is always a good idea.

RussellB
12-08-2011, 08:21 PM
We prune them in SC in mid Feb also. Cut back to about 6-8 inches tall. If you cut them now, all new growth will die off during the winter. I also don't believe that any "small" rose will get larger buds/ blossoms. Whatever size they are now they will remain that size.
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soloscaperman
12-08-2011, 08:30 PM
To be honest Rose Maintence is my weak spot. I bought a few flower books this year and one book shows one that looks like this and it may be a Carpet Rose? I usually don't like asking people questions that can be looked up but I got 3 Rose species that can match up to the one my customer has.

Dr.NewEarth
12-08-2011, 08:30 PM
If you are in an area that gets alot of snow, you can cut them down to about six inches in the fall. Alot of people build up a "volcano" of soil to protect their rootball from the cold. Warmer climates usually don't prune until the spring.

The rule of thumb is to have an odd number of canes pruned to an outward pointing bud with no branches touching. It should kind of look like if you had your hand held with the fingers pointed upwards. (like you're holding a baseball)

soloscaperman
12-08-2011, 08:49 PM
Last year we had two feet on snow within 3 days. The rose on the right cleary has snow damage from last winter. I heard you can buy a plastic shield then fill it up with mulched leaves around the Rose bush during the winter. Does anyone know what kind of Roses these are? Instead of dead headed them I will just leave 8 inches of them I guess.

RussellB
12-08-2011, 08:54 PM
Hard to tell but I think they are knock out roses. Mine have been in for three years and are a couple 2-3 feet taller but mine have also been pruned back each year. If I was to place leaves over my roses, I would cut them down to 6-8 inches first then cover them.
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GMLC
12-08-2011, 08:58 PM
If you are in an area that gets alot of snow, you can cut them down to about six inches in the fall. Alot of people build up a "volcano" of soil to protect their rootball from the cold. Warmer climates usually don't prune until the spring.

The rule of thumb is to have an odd number of canes pruned to an outward pointing bud with no branches touching. It should kind of look like if you had your hand held with the fingers pointed upwards. (like you're holding a baseball)

This is the correct procedure and you should follow it. Problem is these roses look like they haven't been pruned in years! Client may be shocked when she sees how much you have to prune back.

soloscaperman
12-08-2011, 09:05 PM
I agree, I think they are blushing knockout rose's.

One more question............. Should I cut them down and leave them or tie them with a steak and string and then prune them?

Dr.NewEarth
12-08-2011, 09:20 PM
Don't use a steak....maybe a fish head.

RussellB
12-08-2011, 09:27 PM
Lol Doc....... Just cut them down and maybe throw a little rose fertilizer on them in the spring. They will be fine.
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integrityman
12-08-2011, 09:41 PM
Looks like a pink Knock Out to me. That said K/O roses are pretty tough and dont get much, if any winter damage and need little to no ancillary winter protection. A yearly pruning in late winter will keep the bush at a manageable size. Use sharp, sterilized pruning shears to cut back Knock Out roses. Prune back to 12 to 18 inches tall to encourage new growth in the spring. Use some organic fert or a 12-12-12 blend......& let em rip!

soloscaperman
12-08-2011, 10:08 PM
I got my answers lol. I need to hire this girl.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdFM0HpaiJA&feature=relmfu

ralph02813
12-09-2011, 07:37 AM
I agree, I think they are blushing knockout rose's.

One more question............. Should I cut them down and leave them or tie them with a steak and string and then prune them?

At this point, I think I would bury them in leaves or straw, the weather is going to turn, after the first sign of frost is gone trim them back hard. .

Smallaxe
12-09-2011, 09:38 AM
Up against the building and under a mulch of stone and being they are NOT tea roses, I would not cover the plant itself for the winter... Those cones are great for voles and other rodents and perfect for fungal diseases that will start as soon as the temps inside the cone reach 40 degrees...

I would look into the concept of removing 1/3 of the oldest stems each Spring scenario for these roses. The idea being that every 3 years it is a total rejuvenated plant.

I guess, you can prune roses almost anytime but dormant Spring is best for the sake of cleaning up broken branches and misc. winter kill.

andyslawncare
12-12-2011, 09:30 PM
You should state your area/planting zone in your user info. Here in zone 7, we prune roses between feburary 15 and March 15. There are some good youtube videos on pruning roses....watch them.

soloscaperman
12-12-2011, 09:42 PM
Connecticut

Smallaxe
12-13-2011, 07:26 AM
Feb-Mar is fine in Z4 as well... Along with Apr-Jan... :)

professional
12-19-2011, 09:07 AM
Something I learned years ago and has been successful is the use of pine needles for winter protection. I gather them from clients properties in the fall as part of my fall cleanups and use them around the roses of other clients. Recycle. Pine needles do not hold much moisture while helping moderate ground temps around the roses. Maybe eight to ten inches deep and about 12" around. They also stay put real well. Remove them mid-March.

ralph02813
12-19-2011, 02:24 PM
Something I learned years ago and has been successful is the use of pine needles for winter protection. I gather them from clients properties in the fall as part of my fall cleanups and use them around the roses of other clients. Recycle. Pine needles do not hold much moisture while helping moderate ground temps around the roses. Maybe eight to ten inches deep and about 12" around. They also stay put real well. Remove them mid-March.

Geez what a great idea! Thanks.

CrownScapes
12-20-2011, 04:48 AM
Yeah, looks like a knockout rose to me also. I normally cut down to bout a foot and let nature take its course, come back every year