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Mike Leary
12-09-2011, 08:37 PM
I just finished George Carlin's autobiography: "Last Words". What a cool guy!

SoCalLandscapeMgmt
12-09-2011, 11:11 PM
I just finished the Steve Jobs bio.... he was a jerk. In a lot of respects he was a genius but he was also a jerk. I also just read Seal Target Geronimo which is about the mission to get Bin Laden. It was a quick but interesting read, there is a lot of discussion as to how accurate of an account it is but overall the consensus is that it's fairly right on. Earlier in the summer I read Bob Mould's bio and just for kicks Sammy Hagar's bio. And if I can get it back from my brother I will be reading "Where Did the Towers Go? Evidence of Directed Free-energy Technology on 9/11" which is supposed to be a real interesting read. Can't get it on Kindle though so I had to buy the hard cover.

Kiril
12-09-2011, 11:18 PM
A Guide To Elegant Nose Picking
pick with the champs

jvanvliet
12-10-2011, 07:50 AM
"Demonic" by Ann Coulter

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-10-2011, 08:37 AM
My reading list on my IPad2 (awesome) is THE LAW by Bariat a Ron Paul recommendation. killing Lincoln, and The Worm which is about the first cyber world war(supposed to be true). just need to quit playing Settlers of Catan.
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jvanvliet
12-10-2011, 09:46 AM
I got everything on the Kindle my wife bought me; my wife also bought me an I-Phone, forcing a giant leap into the 21st century for me (looks like I'll have to throw out my Motorola Brick). I loaded a Kindle "AP". Now I can read all my books on my I-phone - who da thunk?

Next she'll get me another computer and I'll have to dump this 286...

goodbye old phone :cry:

Wet_Boots
12-10-2011, 10:35 AM
I just finished another P.D. James mystery ~ I like to read them in sequence, to appreciate any story thread that weaves through the novels. For the series that were adapted for television, the backstories in Tony Hillerman's mysteries with Jim Chee and Joe Leaphorn around the Navajo Reservation were good, and those in the Inspector Lynley series by Elizabeth George were extremely good.

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-10-2011, 10:55 AM
I went through a heavy pd James phase. The British mystery/detective books are good reads. I find the first bunch they put out are well done. Then they try to expand their literary skills and go a little flat. Once I give up on an author I never go back.
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Wet_Boots
12-10-2011, 11:34 AM
What is unintentionally weird, is when key plot points from a James and a George mystery are identical, but I only notice them because I'm switching from author to author, and their series began at different times. One of George's backstories became an entire separate novel in the series. Something of a grim masterpiece, knowing on the way in who's going to die and how, but learning of what led up to the event, in a world apart from the usual characters and settings.

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-10-2011, 12:05 PM
I've noticed that before also. It makes me wonder if they read each others mysteries and try to expand on a storyline from another author. They have some big mystery writer convention in which they pick the best mystery writer of the year.
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muddywater
12-10-2011, 08:56 PM
I read the Steve Jobs book and really enjoyed it. Listened to it on my iphone actually. Yes he was a jerk, but the amount of influence he had on his products while being the ceo of a billion dollar company was incredible. His attention to the smallest detail and settling for nothing less than the highest quality is something we can relate to. I thought he was was brash, but I have a certain respect for people that are not afraid to tell someone what they REALLY think.

Trying to find another book similar to this one to read next.

Mike Leary
12-10-2011, 09:21 PM
I've done a lot of systems for "software types", they were great when the money bag suddenly came in. They liked quality, they were not cheapskates like my previous doctors and lawyers were and I enjoyed working with them. I did have one, who shall remain nameless, but right up there with Steve Jobs, that was such a control freak that he would not take my expertise and suggestions to heart. He was also such a cheapskake that he had his accountants add-up my parts call-out to see if I was off a buck or so. I finished the project, which was considerable and after warranty, I said "stick it".

muddywater
12-10-2011, 10:42 PM
I've done a lot of systems for "software types", they were great when the money bag suddenly came in. They liked quality, they were not cheapskates like my previous doctors and lawyers were and I enjoyed working with them. I did have one, who shall remain nameless, but right up there with Steve Jobs, that was such a control freak that he would not take my expertise and suggestions to heart. He was also such a cheapskake that he had his accountants add-up my parts call-out to see if I was off a buck or so. I finished the project, which was considerable and after warranty, I said "stick it".

I have respect for people that care enough to get into details. I am a "cheapskake', so I see both sides of the coin. I ordered $5k worth of sod the other day and the sod company billed me $13 extra... needless to say they got a phone call and gave me a $13 credit. I think when you demand a high level of competency... you get it. Plus I can go to Starbucks 3 times and not feel like a dumbass for paying $4 for a cup of coffee.

At the same time, I would imagine a Mike Leary installed irrigation system has two values. You provide(provided) a high performance irrigation system. AND the minimal maintenance/repair cost for the next 10-15 years might end up actually saving the consumer money.

SoCalLandscapeMgmt
12-11-2011, 01:23 AM
I've done a lot of systems for "software types", they were great when the money bag suddenly came in. They liked quality, they were not cheapskates like my previous doctors and lawyers were and I enjoyed working with them. I did have one, who shall remain nameless, but right up there with Steve Jobs, that was such a control freak that he would not take my expertise and suggestions to heart. He was also such a cheapskake that he had his accountants add-up my parts call-out to see if I was off a buck or so. I finished the project, which was considerable and after warranty, I said "stick it".
Bill Gates is going to be mad if he hears you talkin bout him like that :)
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GreenLight
12-11-2011, 12:27 PM
I loved George Carlin for a long time. But as I got older and realized that the world is one large ironic mess of headstrong individual views, his routines and ideas just seemed to lump him into the "overly serious, bitter and angry, here's why things aren't perfect" group. He was undeniably a deep thinker, but I question why a guy of his intelligence would take life so seriously and ultimately seem pretty miserable. By his end, it almost seemed like the joke was on him. Through all his ramblings that generally ended with god and religion being the butt of jokes, it seemed like he was the one desperate to find something to have faith in.

Continuing on topic, the book "Unbroken" is a really solid read. Biographical book written by the woman who wrote seabiscuit. Initially this was enough to make me disinterested, but after being forced to read the first chapter, I couldn't put it down. Very, very detailed account of time spent in Japanese POW camps during World War 2.

Wet_Boots
12-11-2011, 12:51 PM
Mark Twain's writings touched more on religion in his later life. The Mysterious Stranger was one of the more thoughtful stories I ever read.

GreenLight
12-11-2011, 01:44 PM
Wet Boots, you are right about that. Twain and Carlin virtually shared the exact same sentiments on religion and god. Twain was pretty clear in his sentiments that if god were the creator we described and read about in the bible, then he had a lot of explaining to do considering he was the creator of all things good and evil. Seems like Twain's overall theme was if god was so upset about sin, then why did he create it in the first place, since he is the only one who can decide what is sin or not. Fair question, but there are a lot of long responses to that...

The only thing that bugged me about Carlin as time went on was the generalizations that christianity is based on "how good you are". It made for pretty funny comedy at times, but that is more of a catholic view than a protestant view.

Wet_Boots
12-11-2011, 02:26 PM
I wonder if the Catholic Church hasn't fueled more humorous talent than any other sect of religion.

Mike Leary
12-11-2011, 03:00 PM
No suprise, George was from deep Catholic New York City roots, he wrestled with his background all his life, making light and fun of it, of course.

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-11-2011, 10:55 PM
Unbroken was a good read. I'd highly recommend it as well.
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DanaMac
12-11-2011, 11:30 PM
I'm reading the Game of Thrones series from George R.R. Martin. On book two, Clash of Kings.

Mike Leary
12-12-2011, 11:41 AM
Bill Gates is going to be mad if he hears you talkin bout him like that :)

:laugh::laugh: Someday, I'll tell you all a laughable story about Billy's system. :dizzy:

Wet_Boots
12-12-2011, 12:08 PM
I bet it's hydraulically controlled :p

Mike Leary
12-12-2011, 03:51 PM
I'm sure you've read Tom Wolfe's "Bonfire of the Vanities", Boots. I just finished it.

Wet_Boots
12-12-2011, 04:17 PM
Oh, yeah, long ago. I liked it, even with some of the gaping plot holes.

ARGOS
12-12-2011, 05:25 PM
I'm reading the Game of Thrones series from George R.R. Martin. On book two, Clash of Kings.

Me too. I haven't started two.

DanaMac
12-12-2011, 06:11 PM
Me too. I haven't started two.

Good man. Great minds.......

KrayzKajun
12-12-2011, 06:53 PM
I enjoy reading books by James Patterson. Haven't had much time lately for pleasure reading. Only book I've been reading is my Arborist Certification manual.
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txgrassguy
12-12-2011, 07:17 PM
I used to read detective novels while on surveillance but the lack of accuracy killed the genre for me. I have trundled through all the various works of Maugham, Hemingway, etc even Poe but all left me feeling like I should jump off of a bridge. So I got married instead - with pretty much the same result though.

Read all of the Forester novels, same with Kent, most of W.E.B. Griffith and Butterworth but they are all predictable and therefore worthless.

Essentially all fiction written is predictable therefore pedantic therefore worthless to me. If I am going to waste time I'll take the three minutes and wank off in the shower.

The best non-fiction history I have ever read concerns the origin of WW2 in the Pacific as written by a Japanese author combing archival data across both sides of the pond. Quite illuminating.

Same with the biography of Albert Speer as written by Speer himself while in Spandau.

The most knowledge consuming treatise read to date is Riken's work on ballistics, volume 6.
Extremely in-depth regarding both interior and exterior ballistics - I got some strange looks on the airplane returning from D.C. and the NRA firearms museum.

The most value in terms of efficacy regarding a magazine subscription is a toss up between the pre-2000 American Handloader (prior to their delving into incessant commercialism) and The USGA's greens section on various aspects of turfgrass agronomy. The USGA stuff written by the non-commercialized staff Agronomists was quite helpful to me while a g.c. super but this stuff has since required a way to much passing between the ads to make it useful to me any longer.

Wet_Boots
12-12-2011, 07:26 PM
A life without fiction is like a life without music :(

Mike Leary
12-12-2011, 07:35 PM
We have a pretty amazing "library" here at the camp: mostly crime and love novels, which have never been my forte. But, I have read some novels gotten from here that combined excitement with historical accuracy, which I enjoyed as much as my Pacifico. :drinkup: No Proust, but I've never read Joseph Wambaugh, which is now at my desk.

Wet_Boots
12-12-2011, 08:06 PM
Someday I'll read Proust.




Someday I'll play the bassoon.

Mike Leary
12-12-2011, 08:13 PM
Someday I'll read Proust.




Someday I'll play the bassoon.

Someday you'll get certified to test backflow assemblies. :p

Wet_Boots
12-12-2011, 08:27 PM
At least I got the testing rig. A bassoon, I do not have.

The two items quoted put me in mind of younger days when I would play some particular music while reading a particular book. The following album played on, while I read The Lord of the Rings.

5kEsMHYO_xo

AI Inc
12-13-2011, 07:12 AM
We have a pretty amazing "library" here at the camp: mostly crime and love novels, which have never been my forte. But, I have read some novels gotten from here that combined excitement with historical accuracy, which I enjoyed as much as my Pacifico. :drinkup: No Proust, but I've never read Joseph Wambaugh, which is now at my desk.

Just finished a Joseph Wambaugh when I was in the Bahamas. Hollywood Station.Have read many of his. I also enjoy John Grisham novels. Lawrence Sanders also had some good ones.

txgrassguy
12-13-2011, 10:30 AM
Just finished a Joseph Wambaugh when I was in the Bahamas. Hollywood Station.Have read many of his. I also enjoy John Grisham novels. Lawrence Sanders also had some good ones.

I met Joseph Wambaugh back in the early nineties at a IACP conference in D.C.
Great guy, full of humorous stories.
I asked him why he wrote the fictional works like the New Centurions first and he said he had always wanted to write non-fictional police works like the Onion Field but wanted to learn how to tell a good story first.
My favorite still remains the Choirboys since it reminds me of the first years I spent on patrol. Still valid today it seems.
His best non-fiction work, in my opinion, is The Blooding about the first use of DNA in solving a murder case.

AI Inc
12-14-2011, 08:16 AM
The choirboys was his first book I ever read, great read. I also read the blooding.
Grisham did a good job on a nonfiction about a wrongfully convicted capital case.
Still didnt change my view about the DP, and no boots that dosnt mean double penatration.