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FIMCO-MEISTER
12-13-2011, 01:30 PM
Since I have all winter and can just buy a new one if I screw this one up I have a few questions.
I have a leak at the shaft going into the prop housing. There are 4 bolts holding the motor to the plate. I removed those. There are two allen screws in a brass coupling holding the shaft? I removed those and it seems to me the motor should just pull out?

I removed the 4 bolts holding the pump housing together. Do I need to take a screwdriver and hammer to split the two parts separate?

Wet_Boots
12-13-2011, 01:50 PM
Spray some penetrant on the seam, and tap lightly. Play "Little Drummer Boy" to help you pass the time :)

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-13-2011, 03:07 PM
Would that also be true for the motor shaft? Not sure I absolutely need to remove the motor but it would lighten the pump.

Wet_Boots
12-13-2011, 03:22 PM
Same deal. Most modern pumps wouldn't have that brass coupler, because the motor shaft would have a threaded end that goes directly to the impeller.

Felco #2
12-13-2011, 08:54 PM
The motor nameplate will tell you the shaft type. NEMA 56J would have a threaded shaft I think. Many other NEMA frame standards out there, just don't remember any of them. Sorry if you already know this, just thought I'd put it out there :)

Mike Leary
12-13-2011, 08:58 PM
You guys are not getting any extra points for pics from fuzzy devices. :hammerhead:

Wet_Boots
12-13-2011, 09:04 PM
it's your eyesight that's fuzzy

Mike Leary
12-13-2011, 09:12 PM
it's your eyesight that's fuzzy

Sharp is sharp:

Wet_Boots
12-13-2011, 09:20 PM
there's a John Ford western out there

Mike Leary
12-13-2011, 09:30 PM
there's a John Ford western out there

I've heard stories from older Flagstaff locals what a trip it was when Mr. Ford and Mr.Duke and the cast came to town. John Ford loved Monument Valley.

Wet_Boots
12-13-2011, 09:35 PM
Some of that locale figured prominently into the Tony Hillerman mysteries

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-14-2011, 01:55 PM
WD-40 and a hammer worked like a charm. Never did get the motor separate but I'm thinking I can work around it. So if I put a crescent wrench on the brass coupling on the shaft and a large screwdriver or strap wrench and the impeller will spin off?

Wet_Boots
12-14-2011, 02:11 PM
Could be the brass coupling will come off first, and you won't have to remove the impeller from the shaft. Since you got this far, you could up the ante and apply heat to the brass coupling.

Mike Leary
12-14-2011, 08:59 PM
Wish I could tell what's going on with pic # 2. :dizzy:

Wet_Boots
12-14-2011, 09:26 PM
It's an impeller, bub. What more do you need to know?

SoCalLandscapeMgmt
12-15-2011, 02:01 AM
Sharp is sharp:

That's not sharp.... Just sayin :)
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Mike Leary
12-15-2011, 11:02 AM
It's an impeller, bub. What more do you need to know?

Duh, it just looked like there was some crap in there.

Waterit
12-17-2011, 02:39 AM
You should be able to put a wrench on the shaft end, then strap wrench (or pipe wrench with rag padding jaws) on impeller end.

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-17-2011, 10:03 AM
It will be January before I retackle this project. I am curious who caused Mud's rotor thread to be removed?
Posted via Mobile Device

DanaMac
12-17-2011, 11:02 AM
I am curious who caused Mud's rotor thread to be removed?
Posted via Mobile Device

Either me and/or the spammer that was all over here this morning.
All I was trying to really say, was that we can't just throw an answer out without doing a design and calculations to see which is cheaper for installation. And time and knowledge is money. So yeah, I probably got on my b!tchy high horse again. :)

Mike Leary
12-17-2011, 11:20 AM
That's not sharp.... Just sayin :)

::::Goes to the corner and has a good cry:::: :cry:

Wet_Boots
12-17-2011, 12:40 PM
Either me and/or the spammer that was all over here this morning.
All I was trying to really say, was that we can't just throw an answer out without doing a design and calculations to see which is cheaper for installation. And time and knowledge is money. So yeah, I probably got on my b!tchy high horse again. :)and here I thought it was the mucus - it really was a non-question, because standard residential heads are always going to be cheap enough to undercut a layout of more expensive longer-radius heads, unless you get into 100+ gpm zones

FIMCO-MEISTER
12-17-2011, 01:20 PM
Non-question smacks of Newtonian speak.
Posted via Mobile Device

DanaMac
12-17-2011, 01:36 PM
and here I thought it was the mucus - it really was a non-question, because standard residential heads are always going to be cheap enough to undercut a layout of more expensive longer-radius heads, unless you get into 100+ gpm zones

The job really needs to be done right, not the most cost effective. There is a big difference.

Wet_Boots
12-17-2011, 02:18 PM
The job really needs to be done right, not the most cost effective. There is a big difference.Of course, but strictly for installations on residential properties, you have to be into something out of the ordinary not to be designing with the throws and gpm of standard residential heads. If you even up the ante a little bit, and use big-nozzle PGPs at 40-45 foot spacings on that hypothetical 265-foot square, you have a problem with head stability in some soils.

Mike Leary
12-17-2011, 02:48 PM
Of course, but strictly for installations on residential properties, you have to be into something out of the ordinary not to be designing with the throws and gpm of standard residential heads.

Which separates the pros from the pikers. :p "Residential" heads are cheap and don't last very long. :hammerhead:

Wet_Boots
12-17-2011, 02:55 PM
Safe-T-Lawn ball-drive rotors were residential heads, with a service life exceeding 40 years (so far)

Mike Leary
12-17-2011, 06:57 PM
Safe-T-Lawn ball-drive rotors were residential heads, with a service life exceeding 40 years (so far)

They were built for the long haul, unlike the heads built to actuarial specs these days.

cppendergrast
01-01-2012, 12:12 AM
Soooo, it appears you should take the 1/2" bolt loose on the end of the shaft, inside the impeller, & pull the impeller. The shaft will have a rotary seal behind the impeller that the shaft will slide through. The motor will have to be un-bolted from the housing to allow this. Sometimes the housing bolts are behind the impeller and sometimes they are accessed on the outside of the pump housing between the motor and the pump.

Rotary seals can be tricky but straight ahead. Read the instructions & replace the old one. Pump housing might need a new gasket also.

FIMCO-MEISTER
01-01-2012, 11:33 AM
Thanks I'll get started on this again tomorrow while I have your interest.
Posted via Mobile Device

Wet_Boots
01-01-2012, 11:46 AM
Get the brass coupling off, and you should be able to proceed from there.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-02-2012, 10:50 AM
You should be able to put a wrench on the shaft end, then strap wrench (or pipe wrench with rag padding jaws) on impeller end.

I believe this is right. The more i study it the more I believe that brass coupling is strictly to get a wrench on the shaft to keep it from turning when the propeller is being removed. I've put some screw loose on the propeller where it attaches to the shaft but haven't been able to get it to budge yet. Unfortunately I no longer have my strap wrench. Would a piece of rebar with cloth on it stuck through one of the prop gaps for leverage be a bad idea?

Waterit
02-02-2012, 11:51 AM
I believe this is right. The more i study it the more I believe that brass coupling is strictly to get a wrench on the shaft to keep it from turning when the propeller is being removed. I've put some screw loose on the propeller where it attaches to the shaft but haven't been able to get it to budge yet. Unfortunately I no longer have my strap wrench. Would a piece of rebar with cloth on it stuck through one of the prop gaps for leverage be a bad idea?

First off, get your terminology right: it's an IMpeller, not propeller!:laugh:

That screw is probably a left-hand thread (don't know if this has been mentioned priorly in this thread).

Sure, try a piece of rebar. Take care not to screw up the opening - it's an engineered piece, after all.

You may want to bite the bullet and take it to a machine shop, get them to bust it loose.

Wet_Boots
02-02-2012, 11:59 AM
I think a pump with a brass shaft coupling can be approached from two directions. Modern pumps have the motor shaft with a threaded end that connects to the impeller, and that connection is what you undo to get at the seal. With an older pump, I think you can also look to undo the connection of the shaft to the brass coupling, and not worry about the connection of impeller and shaft.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-02-2012, 12:14 PM
Left handed threads may change my rebar plan since I have to approach it from the little IMPELLER opening. I may swing for a new strap wrench. Every man should have one anyway.

Wet_Boots
02-02-2012, 12:34 PM
You could attack the brass coupling at no added cost. Even if you mark the shaft with the teeth of a wrench, you can clean that up with ease.

Waterit
02-02-2012, 06:31 PM
Peter, you should be able to get a wrench on the other end of the shaft, the electrical end.

Couldn't tell from the pic - where is this screw you can't get out located? Is it in the center of the impeller?

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-03-2012, 11:51 AM
Peter, you should be able to get a wrench on the other end of the shaft, the electrical end.

Couldn't tell from the pic - where is this screw you can't get out located? Is it in the center of the impeller?

This post pic probably explains it. My guess is this would be in the middle of the impeller.
http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=4243720&postcount=12

On a side note I just have to share what to me is a fascinating map. I'm researching the death of my Great Uncle in WWI and an Irish guy named Seamus whose Grandfather died in the same battle sent me a map from the time outlining moving from one trench to another. Its no wonder that war was a slaughter bath.
(appreciate your interest if you have some. My sisters never were good at showing interest in the things I thought were interesting)(also now you know why this pump isn't getting done.)

irritation
02-03-2012, 01:17 PM
On a side note I just have to share what to me is a fascinating map. I'm researching the death of my Great Uncle in WWI and an Irish guy named Seamus whose Grandfather died in the same battle sent me a map from the time outlining moving from one trench to another. Its no wonder that war was a slaughter bath.

You probably have already seen it but here's a thread about the battle with pics and maps.

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?p=199988&sid=969191d140b4a3d02a70db06d1fcf378

Waterit
02-03-2012, 01:43 PM
This post pic probably explains it. My guess is this would be in the middle of the impeller.
http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=4243720&postcount=12


Hard to tell from the pic if that is a screw, bolt, or just raised part of the casting. Not familiar with this particular model pump, but on Sta-Rites the center bolt/screw is usually unnecessary as centrifugal force holds the impeller in place on the shaft.

I get it on the diversion - currently more interested in finishing an addition on the house and getting used to my new smoker than anything doing anything profitable!

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-03-2012, 01:50 PM
You probably have already seen it but here's a thread about the battle with pics and maps.

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?p=199988&sid=969191d140b4a3d02a70db06d1fcf378

No I had not seen that. Thanks irri. If you have any more stuff similar to that pass it my way.