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View Full Version : How late can I plant arborvitae?


dmk395
12-26-2011, 07:11 PM
Assuming I can find some, would it be possible to build a raised bed and plant 4-5 now. I have never planted in December, but have a client that inquired as to how to block her propane tanks that were just installed that were ugly. Can I plant this late?

P.Services
12-26-2011, 07:12 PM
yes, no problems at all. I wouldn't worry at all about it.

KeystoneLawn&Landscaping
12-26-2011, 08:29 PM
yes, no problems at all. I wouldn't worry at all about it.

I'll second that!

Smallaxe
12-27-2011, 09:30 AM
The guideline is "Frozen Ground" not the calendar... Be sure to soak them in at least the first 2 days and that the water drains adequately b4 it freezes...

You may end up with more winterkill than average, depending on how your winter goes... Are you Staking?

phasthound
12-27-2011, 09:48 AM
2 concerns I would have are winter burn http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/dg1411.html and deer damage http://blog.pennlive.com/gardening/2009/06/deergnawed_arborvitae.html.

Winter burn can be prevented, but if you have deer in the area, don't plant arborvitae.

Smallaxe
12-27-2011, 09:55 AM
There is a quick and simple electric solution for deer, but it requires about $100.00 in materials...

A complete wrap in burlap will help prevent winter kill and deer damage , but it is so tacky... :)

bobcat48
12-27-2011, 01:11 PM
Personally i wouldnt,not a good idea for here we already had a couple frosts and i am done for the season been since first week of dec.

MarkintheGarden
12-31-2011, 03:20 AM
You can plant if the ground is not frozen. But you have to monitor the moisture in the bed, too much or too little can both be problems anytime.

I did a lot of planting this last week and will do some more next week. Last year at this time planting was not an option.

Smallaxe
12-31-2011, 06:51 AM
You can plant if the ground is not frozen. But you have to monitor the moisture in the bed, too much or too little can both be problems anytime.

I did a lot of planting this last week and will do some more next week. Last year at this time planting was not an option.

When do you have too much water in a new planting???

MarkintheGarden
12-31-2011, 09:40 AM
When do you have too much water in a new planting???

It can happen, last summer I planted a weeping colorado blue spruce in a new bed with a lot of other plantings and the customer watered frequently. I cannot be absolutely certain, but it seems like the poor thing got watered to death.

Also if the plant is planted in a low space where water collects it can be too much. If you combine that with a freeze you can get a plant in a big chunk of ice.

Over watering does not happen often, but it can, especially with some varieties that do best with less moisture and you have problems with root rot. I have seen roses suffer from over watering.

Sometimes it is not just the overwatering but also poor drainage that occurs due to situations or due to hardpan having been created beneath the soil.

Smallaxe
12-31-2011, 02:55 PM
It can happen, last summer I planted a weeping colorado blue spruce in a new bed with a lot of other plantings and the customer watered frequently. I cannot be absolutely certain, but it seems like the poor thing got watered to death.

Also if the plant is planted in a low space where water collects it can be too much. If you combine that with a freeze you can get a plant in a big chunk of ice.

Over watering does not happen often, but it can, especially with some varieties that do best with less moisture and you have problems with root rot. I have seen roses suffer from over watering.

Sometimes it is not just the overwatering but also poor drainage that occurs due to situations or due to hardpan having been created beneath the soil.

Yes those long term environmental conditions are relevant over time. If you do not have good drainage, then drainage needs to be provided.

What I was referencing is the newly planted/transplanted arborvitaes... for the first 2 or 3 days they should be flooded as much as possible to settle them in, and once the excess water has drained off they are good to go... true of everything I plant, not just arbs... :)

MarkintheGarden
12-31-2011, 03:24 PM
Yes those long term environmental conditions are relevant over time. If you do not have good drainage, then drainage needs to be provided.

What I was referencing is the newly planted/transplanted arborvitaes... for the first 2 or 3 days they should be flooded as much as possible to settle them in, and once the excess water has drained off they are good to go... true of everything I plant, not just arbs... :)

That is true, everything gets soaked for a couple days, but two weeks of wet roots can cause diseases or just plain drown some plants, meanwhile some can live with wet roots.

Smallaxe
12-31-2011, 05:14 PM
That is true, everything gets soaked for a couple days, but two weeks of wet roots can cause diseases or just plain drown some plants, meanwhile some can live with wet roots.

Exactly... The rootzone should be drained and moist before the ground freezes, esp. in heavy soils... :)

My old story about the irrigation guy claiming that the hillside was set by him correctly and the fact that I bumped the amount of irrigation for that zone, had drown the newly planted shrubs that were placed by his crew...

I dug up the dead plants and found that the rootball was bone dry because it was never soaked in at planting time... still wrapped in burlap the ground around it had aqdequate moisture, but inside the burlap water was not getting through...

chips17
01-01-2012, 12:42 PM
Personally i wouldnt,not a good idea for here we already had a couple frosts and i am done for the season been since first week of dec.

listen to bobcat. since hes an expert....

JNyz
01-01-2012, 06:08 PM
Yes, the bobcat post doesn't make much sense.

chips17
01-01-2012, 06:13 PM
Yes, the bobcat post doesn't make much sense.

I'm surprised he didn't say "looks good" for a while there i thought that was his auto-signature