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View Full Version : 18 Wheeler vs Lawn. Help Needed.


PaulMoody
01-05-2012, 04:30 PM
One of my commercial accounts had a 18 wheeler from the business next door drive across the soft lawn. It was night and the driver thought it was a gravel turn out. It's a mess to say the least. The trucking company says they will pay for the repair and I have to submit a bid asap.

Overall area is 13 feet wide x 130 feet long. Ruts are 2-8" deep.

Any input on approach, man hours or price is appreciated. I'm considering renting a ride on roller and seeing how much it will level this out. Then aerate, then fill remaining ruts, then seed or hydro seed or sod.

Thanks,
Paul

PaulMoody
01-05-2012, 05:02 PM
...Or maybe this is simply a complete rotor till and sod job?

Ticolawnllc
01-05-2012, 05:36 PM
...Or maybe this is simply a complete rotor till and sod job?

I would take a sod cutter to all the ruts and sod. the back part maybe take a tractor and scrape off the grass and resod. don't know good luck. looks like a great job to try out this sod cuter

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=366174

BrendonTW
01-05-2012, 08:40 PM
Good gosh how far do you have to drive on grass before you realize that it is not paved??

Depending on the type of grass and blend ability of that sod compared to the seed or sod you can buy, I would just bring soil in and fill in the ruts, compact it well, and then just seed/sod it. That total process would take 3 of yay guys about 3-4 hours on the jobsite with a wheelbarrow and soil delivered right there on the pavement.

If your afraid that it won't be perfectly uniform, till it, compact it, and re sod or seed it.
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Ticolawnllc
01-05-2012, 09:52 PM
maybe a boxblade, topsoil the low, seed all, plug compacted area. With out being there thats the best i got

whosedog
01-05-2012, 10:42 PM
It's always worse when the ground freezes then thaws;trucks sink in much deeper than they would other times of the year.I have a lumberyard down the street from me (18 wheelers are always jumping the curb by my corner when they swing wide)and always notice those ruts are more pronounced after a thaw.I just fill in with topsoil,compact it then seed;no point in seeding now though;I wait till springtime cause the seed will be wasted this time of year.

Kennedy Landscaping
01-06-2012, 01:02 AM
Two options, for a minimal mess, you could haul in some top soil, fill the ruts and pack the new soil in there good and seed. Or you could do as suggested and till the area, re work the ground and sod or seed it. I'd probably just till off a nice squared area, level it out and compact it nice and sod the area, make it look real nice with squared edges, and it'd pay better than just filling in the ruts. It's all how much they want to spend though....

tyler_mott85
01-06-2012, 08:17 PM
If you're renting any equipment rent a skid-loader and pull all those ruts up from below. simply rolling will make so much compaction the turf would probably never look right again.
Typically lawn areas that look as well as that around here are irrigated. Is there an irrigation system? Maybe they're not common in the NW like they are here in the plains. May have potential broken lines, valves, or heads. If it is irrigated you'll want to start up the system and check for broken stuff before you submit your bid. Have a utility company come out and see if there are any lines in the area. I've seen cable companies put cables under sod before the sod is installed and it gets cut during simple aeration. 80,000 lbs of truck can surely do some damage.

After you pull up the ruts I'd just bring in new dirt and spread it out. That soil there is so compacted and messed up, plus it's winter, taking the time to till that out would be ridiculous and labor intensive.

by multiplying the dimensions you've given you need approx 30 cu yds of topsoil. Add extra for compaction.

Ask your soil company to have the truck there to load it up.

They bring new soil after you've gotten old out. You load up truck with old soil...they drive off. You spread out new soil. Put down erosion control matting since it's still winter and seed in spring.

Then you can upsell the customer to put markers or railroad ties along the edge of the drive!

Wordy, I know. Sorry. It's a Friday. Watcha gunna do? :)


Good luck!

PlantscapeSolutions
01-06-2012, 11:57 PM
I would water the hell out of it and make it soft. Then you can use a tamper to pound down the high areas. Bring in some slightly amended soil for the low spots that will make the areas recover more quickly. Your up north so I'm guessing it's Rye, Fescue, or something similar that you can get a bunch of from seed for cheap. Seed the hell out of it and cover it with a fine layer of mulch or straw to keep in moisture and help germination.

The insurance company is going to pay so bid the hell out of it. You should be able to make an easy grand or more.


You can see it's an industrial areas so it doesn't need to be perfect like it would if it were a residential.

plantations lawn & garden
01-07-2012, 02:57 AM
cheapest way out is fill ruts with mix soil compost mix and seed it wont be as quick as sod but you pocket more but charge less.
insurence covers that?

Ticolawnllc
01-07-2012, 10:18 AM
cheapest way out is fill ruts with mix soil compost mix and seed it wont be as quick as sod but you pocket more but charge less.
insurence covers that?

What to do with the massive compaction on the other side of the ruts?
Water is going to have a hard time draining through that.
I would think that if top soil is layed on top when it rains the loam would get water loged.

chips17
01-08-2012, 09:32 AM
I have one a bit worse then that to do in the spring... 35ton Ladder truck got stuck in the mud at a church fire. the ruts are knee deep

4 seasons lawn&land
01-08-2012, 10:26 AM
there are some crazy ideas in here. Did someone say 30 yards of top soil? lol. Just Harley rake it and seed it. Ifyou dont want to spend 300 on the skid and attachment rental the rototiller and some hand raking would do okay. Just dont go to deep.

SDLandscapes VT
01-08-2012, 12:34 PM
Frankly it shocks me some of the replies here. Ruts are the very epitome of compaction and if you want grass to grow there well and have a prayer of being drained you have got to relive the compaction. If it were me I would get a rotadairon and do a rectangular area--several passes would be necessary to get to the bottom of the compacted layer--mixing in some compost on the final pass dormant seed and erosion blanket or sod and collect.

Topsoil in the ruts doesnt "fix" the problem

Smallaxe
01-08-2012, 04:05 PM
Frankly it shocks me some of the replies here. Ruts are the very epitome of compaction and if you want grass to grow there well and have a prayer of being drained you have got to relive the compaction. If it were me I would get a rotadairon and do a rectangular area--several passes would be necessary to get to the bottom of the compacted layer--mixing in some compost on the final pass dormant seed and erosion blanket or sod and collect.

Topsoil in the ruts doesnt "fix" the problem

Unless we are talking about blowsand, you're absolutely correct... I might even take a spade, spend a couple of hours digging out the bottom of the ruts, rather than till up everything within the rectangle... especially if it is thick sod...

metro36
01-08-2012, 04:08 PM
I would aerate the snot out of the whole area. Fill and compact the area with soil/ compost mix. Spread the seed, rake the seed in and be done. I have used this method to repair a few lawns after pool installs. They were driven over by fully loaded dumps during the spring when soaked. The ruts were about 8" deep but were more of a wide U shape than yours.

Tilling it would be best but the owner might not want to look at it all winter until the grass comes in. It is also a bit more labor intensive.

TurnerLawn&Landscape
01-11-2012, 10:59 AM
Okay, do not listen to anyone who has suggested compaction. YOU NEVER WANT TO COMPACT, THIS IS ALREADY A COMPACTION PROBLEM, compaction leads to little or no pore spaces, decreased oxygen levels, decreased percolation, the slowing down of OM breakdown, etc. Also, the ground can be compacted from this type of scenario as deep as 3 feet! I would take a sod cutter and remove the "lips" around the area of the tracks. Then aerate the hell out of it, and then add a heavy layer of Organic Matter, or some type of compost (mushroom maybe) Aeration and the breakdown of the OM will help to relieve this compaction problem caused by the truck. THIS PROCESS MAY NEED TO BE REPEATED. IF YOU JUST COME IN A LAY TOPSOIL ON TOP OF THE RUTS, YOU WILL STILL HAVE A COMPACTION PROBLEM, DEAL. DEAL WITH THE COMPACTION FIRST, AND THEN PUT YOUR SOIL & SEED DOWN.

FINALLY, IF YOU HAVE SUGGESTED TO COMPACT THIS AREA, I WOULD RECOMMEND ENHANCING YOUR KNOWLEDGE/EDUCATION IN SOIL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT.

SDLandscapes VT
01-11-2012, 11:01 AM
Thank you Turner---so very true

plantations lawn & garden
01-12-2012, 02:28 PM
with the method of soil seed is the owner says as cheap as you can. you guys all know you have heard it.. all depends on your client.

SDLandscapes VT
01-12-2012, 02:32 PM
cheap doesnt make it right---if everyone prescribed what was right rather than a shortcut we wouldn t be having this discussion--perhaps this field should be more like plumbing or electrical--board regulated and requiring certification

green_thumb
01-12-2012, 05:32 PM
Rototill the area, topdress with 2-3 yards of soil/compost mix, seed it, cover with Penn Mulch. then call it a day. Customer responsible for watering
2 guys plus materials and labor. I would charge around $450-550+tx.

ps. do not get 30 yards.





by multiplying the dimensions you've given you need approx 30 cu yds of topsoil. Add extra for compaction.





What the hell!! 30 yards!!:hammerhead:

metro36
01-12-2012, 09:57 PM
What the hell!! 30 yards!!:hammerhead:

I think he accounted for the overall area. If you were to cover the entire area with 6" of material you would need approx 32 yards. 130x13/2/27= 31.3. That would just be a waste of material and wouldn't solve the compaction issues.

green_thumb
01-12-2012, 11:25 PM
I think he accounted for the overall area. If you were to cover the entire area with 6" of material you would need approx 32 yards. 130x13/2/27= 31.3. That would just be a waste of material and wouldn't solve the compaction issues.

I understand that, but you don't need to repair the whole area.
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Ticolawnllc
01-13-2012, 06:38 AM
I understand that, but you don't need to repair the whole area.
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once you start you will see, that its more work not to do the spcae in between then it is to do only the ruts. If you don't the job will cost the same but look much worst.

tyler_mott85
01-14-2012, 07:51 PM
once you start you will see, that its more work not to do the spcae in between then it is to do only the ruts. If you don't the job will cost the same but look much worst.

Exactly. This is simply an efficiency issue. Why would take the time to hand dig out at least 260 feet of rutting...which is more likely 500 linear feet considering there are more than one "set" of ruts, when you can use a machine and dig out the 1700 sq feet of affected area. Simply drop in the 30 cu yds of new soil and go on with life. This is not that difficult thing to do or figure out how to do it.

And yes. 30 cu yds. Simple math people. :clapping:

Why any one of you would simply "til" up that compacted soil is beyond me. It would be like grinding up concrete. It's still concrete....just little pieces of concrete. You need to bring in fresh soil for the entire area.

But go ahead and just do the minimum to cover the area...and there by cover your rear. It may never show on the surface. The property owner may never know. The insurance may never know. But I would know that I could of done a better job. I guess that's just not enough for everyone. :rolleyes:

Please post pics after you're done "fixing" the area. And then post pics again in a year to see what it looks like.

4 seasons lawn&land
01-14-2012, 10:51 PM
if you were stupid enough to have to remove the compacted soil then you could just do the ruts with a little excavator instead of digging the entire 1700 square feet. That said, you dont have to worry about it since the owner surely wont go for $2k for some tire tracks. I can see your point if we were dealing with the section of turf between the rose garden and the white house but I would still say you were a little overkill.

Hey lets hear it for common sense:clapping: