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McCord L & I
01-13-2012, 12:29 AM
Looking at bidding a big maintenance account. The job would consist of at least 6 guys and be 4-5 days a week. The question is, do I need to pay some sort of wages for traveling to site? The jobsite is roughly 1 1/2 hours from the shop. They will be driving my trucks, so does that mean that I need to pay their wages once they leave the yard? I can see the traffic excuses now, "it took us 3 hours to get there, worked 8 hours boss, then took us 3 hours to get home, all week". Right now the way everything is set up with our accounts, it takes them 8 hours to travel and get everything done and I'm happy, their happy, customers are happy. Looking at going ALOT bigger in business with this account, just afraid to go broke with this one!

CLARK LAWN
01-13-2012, 12:49 AM
yes by law you have to pay them. its not their fault you took work so far away. if you bid it right you included travel time inthe bid.

McCord L & I
01-13-2012, 12:54 AM
Yeah......once I read this out loud to myself, I knew the answer.

FoghornLeghorn
01-13-2012, 01:23 AM
possible solution: Keep a truck and trailer in the city of the work, then rent a spot at a storage lot. Hire local employees from there to eliminate their drive time. It's a satellite office.

McCord L & I
01-13-2012, 01:31 AM
Wife and I were bouncing that around as well........there is a possibility that if we get this one, we will get another one of their large HOA's an hour and a half in the other direction. That one is 3x the size, so having a shop there and hiring locally was the no brainer on that one.

Glad I remembered this site, been reading for a couple of hours now, alot of great info! Easier to sit up late and read possible solutions to my business worries than lying in bed till 4 am thinking about how I'm going to do this:dizzy:

idealscape2TD
01-13-2012, 08:09 AM
Hey man...I price and service several accounts like the one you mentioned. By law here in NC we only have to pay them one way. We pay everyone in the truck to go TO the job, but we only pay the driver back. Check out your states labor laws...it could end up saving you quite a bit of cash.

greenmonster304
01-14-2012, 12:45 PM
By law here in NC we only have to pay them one way. We pay everyone in the truck to go TO the job, but we only pay the driver back. Check out your states labor laws...it could end up saving you quite a bit of cash.

That is ****** up. If I worked there and the drier was getting paid and I wasn't I would be pissed. Do most people operate that way? Or do some pay both ways.
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FoghornLeghorn
01-14-2012, 01:03 PM
Why is that messed up? The driver is responsible for getting the crew to and from safely, so he needs to pay attention during drivetime. Hence, he's still working. The other crew members can nap, text, or BS on the drive. Seems fair to me...
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JBNC
01-15-2012, 12:57 AM
That is ****** up. If I worked there and the drier was getting paid and I wasn't I would be pissed. Do most people operate that way? Or do some pay both ways.
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Yeah everyone I know of does this, where I work we get paid on the way back though since when we get back we wash and load up. Mornings we just get there and head out.

jslawnscape
01-28-2012, 09:23 PM
I would pay for travel regardless of the laws. Do you (your company) perform work for free for your customers ? Are travel costs not factored in to your "home-town" jobs ?

Happy employees typically perform better than un happy employees. I can hear guys complaining now "that cheap **** isn't paying us to ride" and meanwhile they're thinking of how to work slower or take advantage of you. If they/you are sensible they/you know there is a reason why you took a job 1+hrs away.....and thats for the money.

If you don't want to pay them to ride don't expect them to do anything extra...(pick up that item in the yard before running over it, going the extra mile, etc.

Just my two cents, some of you will agree some won't.

OneLineAtATime
01-29-2012, 11:17 AM
We mow two hours away, first year paid both ways, 2nd year we rented a storage unit and ran a mow crew out of there.

grass-scapes
02-01-2012, 04:28 PM
Hey man...I price and service several accounts like the one you mentioned. By law here in NC we only have to pay them one way. We pay everyone in the truck to go TO the job, but we only pay the driver back. Check out your states labor laws...it could end up saving you quite a bit of cash.

This is copied direct from the NC DOL:


"The time an employee spends driving or riding as a part of their job may or may not be hours worked based on the circumstances and under certain conditions. Regular home-to-work and work-to-home travel is normally not work-time. Travel from the employer's office to a worksite and travel from the worksite back to the employer's office is work-time for the driver of a company vehicle. Travel from the employer's office to a worksite and travel from the worksite back to the employer's office is not work-time for a rider in a company vehicle as long as the following conditions are met: (1) the riding to and from the worksite and office in the company vehicle is optional and not mandatory, (2) for the trip to the first or only worksite, the rider does not help to load the company vehicle at the office, and (3) for the trip from the last or only worksite back to the office, the rider does not help to unload the company vehicle once back at the office. The travel-time between worksites is work-time for both drivers and riders regardless if using a company vehicle or an employee's personal vehicle.

Furthermore, even if the travel-time is work-time, the employer may elect to pay an employee a lower hourly rate for this work-time, which may be set as low as the minimum wage. For example, if a construction-employee is paid $15.00 an hour for their normal duties, the employer may elect to pay this employee $8.00 an hour (or as low as $7.25 an hour) for the travel-time that is work-time. Please review the federal labor law rules on hours worked in Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 785, which the North Carolina Department of Labor has adopted. The rules on "Travel Time" are found in 785.33 through 785.41"

Now, are you requiring him to ride with you? I know the next statement from you would be....no, someone can come pick him up or he can drive his own vehicle, but that wouldn't be feasible. According to this as well, if they helped load it or unload it, they must be paid. I would probably pay them to be safe.

JBNC
02-01-2012, 06:54 PM
I've never thought about looking that up. I wonder what they consider "optional?" I guess I could drive my truck to the first job..but then it would have to stay there all day.

grass-scapes
02-01-2012, 07:02 PM
I've never thought about looking that up. I wonder what they consider "optional?" I guess I could drive my truck to the first job..but then it would have to stay there all day.

Optional to me would mean can they drive in their own vehicles all day or do they need to be in the company vehicle from the time they leave the shop until they return. Think about it...If someone is allowed to drive their own vehicle back, why would they even return to the shop? Why not go straight home from the last job?

If someone is going to be late to work, I will allow someone to drop them off with the crew, but will not allow them to drive their vehicle all day. If something happens and they are in a wreck while on the clock in their own vehicle, a good lawyer will have MY insurance pay. I carry non-owned coverage as a good measure.

JBNC
02-01-2012, 07:23 PM
Exactly, so I'm sure with most companies it's not really "optional" and you should be payed from the time you leave the shop. It sucks when you get to work at 7 and sometimes don't get paid until 8:30-9.

grass-scapes
02-01-2012, 07:36 PM
Exactly, so I'm sure with most companies it's not really "optional" and you should be payed from the time you leave the shop. It sucks when you get to work at 7 and sometimes don't get paid until 8:30-9.

I worked for a company when I was in my early 20s that didn't pay me for travel time back to the shop and we worked in places like atlanta and birmingham on occasion. We are talking 8 to 10 hours travel time.

it seems there would be very few instances when landscape crew member would be exempt from being paid for travel time. In my case years ago, I can see how it fit my case, but I have my guys load and unload if needed.

imow in NC
02-23-2012, 07:41 AM
That is ****** up. If I worked there and the drier was getting paid and I wasn't I would be pissed. Do most people operate that way? Or do some pay both ways.
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If you took a job 90 miles from your home and it took you 1 and half hours to travel there you would not be paid driving time unless you had an agreement with the employer to begin with. I agree with the original post. I pay the driver. I do not pay the riders either to or from. If they do not like it, they can look for employment elsewhere.:cry:

StihlMechanic
02-23-2012, 06:46 PM
Wow. Cant believe this question.

Duekster
04-03-2012, 07:13 AM
If you took a job 90 miles from your home and it took you 1 and half hours to travel there you would not be paid driving time unless you had an agreement with the employer to begin with. I agree with the original post. I pay the driver. I do not pay the riders either to or from. If they do not like it, they can look for employment elsewhere.:cry:

I think you could be setting yourself up for the :cry:

http://www.dol.gov/elaws/esa/flsa/hoursworked/screen1d.asp

Snapper Jack
04-04-2012, 08:56 PM
Hey man...I price and service several accounts like the one you mentioned. By law here in NC we only have to pay them one way. We pay everyone in the truck to go TO the job, but we only pay the driver back. Check out your states labor laws...it could end up saving you quite a bit of cash.
What a bunch of "CRAP" from destination point A to B back to A, they're your employees and should be payed round trip and I don't care about NC labor laws either, as in most cases there are loop holes for employers like yourself to screw your employees over.:nono: