PDA

View Full Version : Exmark Aerator plug count per sq ft


djagusch
01-26-2012, 09:38 PM
Interested in seeing how this compares to LS's claims in the past and other mfg's. Exmark has them posted on their website. I have not seen other mfg's state plugs per sq ft, just a tine pattern. Hoping Exact chimes in.

21" 36 tines, 4.6 plugs per sq ft
24" 36 tines, 4 plugs per sq ft
30" 48 tines, 4.6 plugs per sq ft

Exact Rototilling
01-26-2012, 10:23 PM
Interested in seeing how this compares to LS's claims in the past and other mfg's. Exmark has them posted on their website. I have not seen other mfg's state plugs per sq ft, just a tine pattern. Hoping Exact chimes in.

21" 36 tines, 4.6 plugs per sq ft
24" 36 tines, 4 plugs per sq ft
30" 48 tines, 4.6 plugs per sq ft

:laugh:

Yes finally some truth in plug count from a manufacturer for a change. My hats off to Exmark for having the peebles to post the correct mathematical count for the dual hydro LS/Exmark/Toro.

I will have to check my notes on the 21” and stander. Both have the same tines spacing.

....more later.

DA Quality Lawn & YS
01-26-2012, 11:10 PM
All those plug counts indicate is you'd better double pass for best results.
Typical rolling tine counts.

Exact Rototilling
01-26-2012, 11:14 PM
Stander and 21” WB are actually 4.571428571428571 plugs per sq foot

Yes just checked. Stander and 21” WB are actually 4.571428571428571 plugs per sq. foot.

So rounded off 4.6 is good.

I keep getting conflicting reports on tine spacing on the Turfco XT5 so I can't compare. :rolleyes:

Exact Rototilling
01-26-2012, 11:30 PM
All those plug counts indicate is you'd better double pass for best results.
Typical rolling tine counts.

Given a choice I’d rather mow over a lawn aerated [single pass] with my Lawn Solution 21” WB than my Plugr 850 [single pass]. Dirt cloud and debris kicked up by the mower is pretty extreme with a single Plugr 850 pass.

The Oregon G6 gators do the best job on plug break up BTW.

TMlawncare
01-27-2012, 01:06 AM
You otta walk across a lawn after a Ryab lawnaire 28 makes a single pass. That thing must pull 15-18 plugs per sqft.

Exact Rototilling
01-27-2012, 01:15 AM
You otta walk across a lawn after a Ryab lawnaire 28 makes a single pass. That thing must pull 15-18 plugs per sqft.

Yes those pull 8.5 per square foot as per tine spacing. Currently the tightest pattern in a single pass with a walk behind aerator. Never seen one in person. Would love to try one out and compare with my plugr 850's
Posted via Mobile Device

oomph
01-27-2012, 04:45 AM
don't take my word for it just yet, as I plan to call my Turfco rep again this week to confirm, but I think I recall him saying 6.

I'll be in touch with him this week and can confirm. Perhaps Turfcobob can chime in as well, since he's a regular on these forums.

oomph
01-27-2012, 04:50 AM
According to this video, Ryan claims 12 plugs per square foot.
Ryan® Lawnaire® 28 Aerator
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eX2pDlBEZu4

Exact Rototilling
01-27-2012, 05:01 AM
The only way to accurately calculate it is based on tine spacing fore and aft then left right. It the formula Purdue uses. Another lawnsite member in the last 18 months straightened me out on it. I was doing crazy things like plotting on graph paper...doing square foot cut out square equivalent etc.
Counting the holes....rotating the square etc. :dizzy:

I'm actually a fan of Turfco Bob's post. I wish he'd offer a aeration seminar online course since he's a wealth of information.

Anyhow he'll say something to the effect of soil fracturing advantage of the X or V factor of a fixed tine ripping the turf subsoil and roots.

However there is no denying the superior topdress effect of a Plugr delivering the plugs up near the top of the grass blades making the top dressing effect from the distribution of soil back down on top of the turf for thatch breakdown etc.

My experience is plugr hydro can rip and.tear in their own right when you slow.the machine down using the front hydro as a brake. It will actually lift the sod off the sub soil.
Posted via Mobile Device

Exact Rototilling
01-27-2012, 05:07 AM
According to this video, Ryan claims 12 plugs per square foot.
Ryan® Lawnaire® 28 Aerator
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eX2pDlBEZu4

Yes if you line up the square cut out to get more plugs yes. But the math is 8.5 per square foot.

I'll have to find the Purdue paper on it so folks don't think I'm fudging this. :)

Will try to post later....
Posted via Mobile Device

oomph
01-27-2012, 05:46 AM
You're referring to this?

http://www.agry.purdue.edu/turf/pubs/AY-8.pdf

Exact Rototilling
01-27-2012, 12:27 PM
You're referring to this?

http://www.agry.purdue.edu/turf/pubs/AY-8.pdf

That's it. Page 3 top of the the page.
Posted via Mobile Device

Exact Rototilling
01-29-2012, 03:17 PM
I do find it ironic that Exmark puts the CORRECT plugs per square foot down in the specs but not the tine spacing...?

For the 24 Dually it is 4.0” x 9”. For the Stander and 21” WB it is 3.5” x 9”

I think this is a bit confusing for buyer who is not up on this. On the surface it looks like the Ryan Lawnaire 28 reciprocating aerator would pull 3 times that amount of plugs over the Exmark 24 dually based on the specs on the manufactures web site. Truth is it only pulls just over double the plugs in a single pass at 8.5 per square foot vs. 4.0. Granted that is significant but not triple. The Plugr 800’s pull double the plugs over the Lawn Solution 24 dually.

Okay I’ll try to clear some differences here between the Ryan 28 vs. Plugr 800, 850 & 855. Due to the camshaft type action of the Plugr’s... the tines are capable off propelling the machine forward. The PL 800 relies exclusively on the tine action to move the machine forward. With the front wheel hydro drive PL850/855 you can slow the machine down and tighten the fore and aft pattern and the tines will produce a wake of plugs and soil fracturing that will no doubt exceed what ANY walk behind soil fracturing that a rolling tine unit will produce. So at least with the Plugr ® soil fracturing does occur the soil to some degree. Since I have never seen a Ryan 28 in person I can say if the tines will drive the machine forward IF the wheel drive is disengaged. Would love to demo one to find out and compare. Ryan® seems to be making an issue of the vertical action of the tines. Maybe they are not able to move the machine forward like a Plugr can.....?

turfcobob
01-31-2012, 03:04 PM
The only way to accurately calculate it is based on tine spacing fore and aft then left right. It the formula Purdue uses. Another lawnsite member in the last 18 months straightened me out on it. I was doing crazy things like plotting on graph paper...doing square foot cut out square equivalent etc.
Counting the holes....rotating the square etc. :dizzy:

I'm actually a fan of Turfco Bob's post. I wish he'd offer a aeration seminar online course since he's a wealth of information.

Anyhow he'll say something to the effect of soil fracturing advantage of the X or V factor of a fixed tine ripping the turf subsoil and roots.

However there is no denying the superior topdress effect of a Plugr delivering the plugs up near the top of the grass blades making the top dressing effect from the distribution of soil back down on top of the turf for thatch breakdown etc.

My experience is plugr hydro can rip and.tear in their own right when you slow.the machine down using the front hydro as a brake. It will actually lift the sod off the sub soil.
Posted via Mobile Device

Guys if you want a real and true understanding of the spacing you have to run the unit over the turf and measure and count the holes. Spacing will vary with depth, speed and type of soil. What you will find in the books is calculated spacing if everything is PERFECT. Try this if you really want to know. Get on a nice piece of smooth turf (we used to do it an a pactice green) Run the unit through several passes being very precise with the driving so you get the correct spacing between passes. Then measure off a square such as 3 foot by 3 foot count the holes and devide by the number of sq ft. That is how we used to do it at Ryan and it is truely the only way you will get a precise number.

My advise is all of the rolling units today do approximatly the same thing in hole count. When you consider the poor driving of the operators, the soil conditions and etc you are getting basically the same thing out of each one. The important thing is multiple passes on the lawn at different directions. Sinche the tines are ripping the ground you want them to rip in different directions to get the most soil disturbance. Counting cores on the top is for homeowners. If you really want to impress the homeowners carry and extra supply of cores and go toss them on the lawn. If you want to do the best job for the plants do multiple passes at different angles.

jfoxtrot9
02-01-2012, 02:26 PM
Guys if you want a real and true understanding of the spacing you have to run the unit over the turf and measure and count the holes. Spacing will vary with depth, speed and type of soil. What you will find in the books is calculated spacing if everything is PERFECT. Try this if you really want to know. Get on a nice piece of smooth turf (we used to do it an a pactice green) Run the unit through several passes being very precise with the driving so you get the correct spacing between passes. Then measure off a square such as 3 foot by 3 foot count the holes and devide by the number of sq ft. That is how we used to do it at Ryan and it is truely the only way you will get a precise number.

My advise is all of the rolling units today do approximatly the same thing in hole count. When you consider the poor driving of the operators, the soil conditions and etc you are getting basically the same thing out of each one. The important thing is multiple passes on the lawn at different directions. Sinche the tines are ripping the ground you want them to rip in different directions to get the most soil disturbance. Counting cores on the top is for homeowners. If you really want to impress the homeowners carry and extra supply of cores and go toss them on the lawn. If you want to do the best job for the plants do multiple passes at different angles.

OK Turfcobob, I have to ask. How will spacing vary by depth, speed and type of soil with a rolling tine?

turfcobob
02-02-2012, 11:56 AM
OK Turfcobob, I have to ask. How will spacing vary by depth, speed and type of soil with a rolling tine?

Tine spacing will change as tines go deeper. A soft deep soil will give you a thighter for and aft spacing as the tines are going deep thus the diameter of the wheel or tine reel gets smaller. In dry times the tine is going very shallow so the diameter gets bigger and thus further apart. Engineers tend to calculate at the deep setting which means lawns have to be very wet and soft. How often is that? Side to side spacing never changes unless you have a poor operator making gaps in the passes.

Also you need to take into consideration the free wheeling tines on most of your rolling aerators today. The free wheeling tine will tend to line up with the powered tines. This does not hurt anything as you are getting the same Aeration Action but it will mess up the Aeration Pattern. Got more questions just ask 402-432-2446

jfoxtrot9
02-02-2012, 07:49 PM
Tine spacing will change as tines go deeper. A soft deep soil will give you a thighter for and aft spacing as the tines are going deep thus the diameter of the wheel or tine reel gets smaller. In dry times the tine is going very shallow so the diameter gets bigger and thus further apart. Engineers tend to calculate at the deep setting which means lawns have to be very wet and soft. How often is that? Side to side spacing never changes unless you have a poor operator making gaps in the passes.

Also you need to take into consideration the free wheeling tines on most of your rolling aerators today. The free wheeling tine will tend to line up with the powered tines. This does not hurt anything as you are getting the same Aeration Action but it will mess up the Aeration Pattern. Got more questions just ask 402-432-2446

Thanks Turfcobob. Had never considered these things. It makes sense.:usflag:

PR Fect
02-07-2012, 06:33 PM
EXACT, the RYAN 28 does move forward with the action of the tines. But its more like an jumping motion. The dam thing is like trying to hang on to an Jack rabbit! But it does the best job core aeration we have ever tried. Hard soil no problem. But because of cost and hard to hang on too, we now own a Billy Goat EZ AER.

Exact Rototilling
02-07-2012, 08:10 PM
EXACT, the RYAN 28 does move forward with the action of the tines. But its more like an jumping motion. The dam thing is like trying to hang on to an Jack rabbit! But it does the best job core aeration we have ever tried. Hard soil no problem. But because of cost and hard to hang on too, we now own a Billy Goat EZ AER.
Have you ever had complaints showing up with the Billy Goat when the last time you ran the Ryan 28...?

I've had my share of complaints running my Lawns Solutions 21" WB when the prior time I ran the Plugr 850.

Also do you offer a second pass and how much extra.do you charge?

A second pass with my plugr 850 delivers a brutal shocking amount of plugs and it makes for a truly miserable mowing experience when the plug dry out to any extent.
Posted via Mobile Device

PR Fect
02-07-2012, 11:47 PM
We have learned to keep the tines in the ground when on the property, and keep the pattern tight. If we are not pulling real deep cores (I. E. you do not see allot) we will go over an area twice. But no we still only go one pass for the most part.

Exact Rototilling
02-18-2012, 10:23 PM
Aeration season is right around the corner. Thought I'd dig up a thread from last year.

DavidNJ is the one who set me straight on the “TRUE” plug count issue. Yes the mathematical formula Purdue uses as well as Exmark. Best Aerator (http://70.85.43.66/showthread.php?p=3870763#post3870763)

http://www.linksaerificationplus.com/images/ulen.jpg