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RickL1700
02-07-2012, 12:30 AM
How do I figure the Sq Footage of a yard? Just lxw? what if it is uneven like 100 on one side and 65 on the other side and 50 by 70 on front and back? Is that how you determine sq ft of a yard. Also how do you figure the # of yards of mulch you need per area? Thanks and sorry if its should be common sense, I just want to make sure I'm doing it the right way.

atasteofnature
02-07-2012, 01:21 AM
Square foot is Length X Width and here is a website for mulch calculation: http://www.gardenplace.com/content/calculator/mulch_calc.html#
Rough estimant is sq. ft./100 100X10=1000/100=10 yrds. of mulch that will put down roughly 3" of mulch

ReddensLawnCare
02-07-2012, 09:59 AM
You need to develop the ability to segment the property. Get a pad and paper and measure each segment separately. Add them all up and there you go! It takes some time, but you will get the hang of it.

p2000sk
02-09-2012, 04:57 PM
The square footage of a yard is 9 square feet!

Seriously though, if you are simply measuring total turf area...
A quick thing to do might be to figure the total area of the lot, then deduct area of structures such as driveway, house, shed, pool, etc.
What you have left is area of turf. Homeowner might think my suggestion strange (you measuring their driveway and such), so maybe you follow someone else idea.

RickL1700
02-09-2012, 05:03 PM
The square footage of a yard is 9 square feet!

Seriously though, if you are simply measuring total turf area...
A quick thing to do might be to figure the total area of the lot, then deduct area of structures such as driveway, house, shed, pool, etc.
What you have left is area of turf.

Lol thank you I was just curious about the measurements and if its worth it. I just look at a property walk it and figure in my head how long to mow, trim, edge, blow and add it all together and if its 2 hrs then I'll charge my normal hourly rate x2 and i didn't know if it was better or made much difference to measure

FinerCutslawnCare
02-09-2012, 09:39 PM
Square foot is Length X Width and here is a website for mulch calculation: http://www.gardenplace.com/content/calculator/mulch_calc.html#
Rough estimant is sq. ft./100 100X10=1000/100=10 yrds. of mulch that will put down roughly 3" of mulch

That is a nice helpfull site!

Thanksman
02-09-2012, 09:56 PM
That is a nice helpfull site!

agreed :usflag:

32vld
02-11-2012, 10:55 PM
I always measure the property. Eliminate error on my part so I don't undercharge and lose money or over bid and lose money because I did not get the account.

You appear more professional when you approach the customer with the price based on sf instead of them thinking you pulled some number out of the air that they would be willing to pay.

Also by having the sf when meeting with the customer you can up sell aerating, lime, fertilizer. It's showing the customer you are organized and know what you are doing.

RickL1700
02-11-2012, 11:04 PM
Yeah that does make you look better and it does help with everything you said. Thanks
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Hughes Landscaping
02-12-2012, 01:08 AM
You need to determine square feet (length x width) and then convert it into cubic feet (length x width x depth). The part that always confuses people is the depth part when calculating cubic feet. You have to convert the depth into a percentage of a foot. For instance, if you want the mulch to be 3" deep, you would multipy the length x width x .25. The reason you would use .25 is because 3" deeps equal to 1/4 of a foot. If you wanted 6" deep, you would multipy LxWx.50. This will give you the amount of cubic feet needed. Then to figure out how many cubic yards you need, you divide the cubic feet number by 27. The reason you use 27 is because there are 27 cubic feet in a yard.

RickL1700
02-12-2012, 03:00 AM
Thanks Hughes
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atasteofnature
02-12-2012, 09:10 PM
Your welcome. I always believe in paying it forward!

andyslawncare
02-14-2012, 01:22 AM
www.goilawn.com


I use go ilawn most of the time. Can bid for mainteanance, design irrigation systems, measure linear distance, and of course find the exact square footage.

andyslawncare
02-14-2012, 01:26 AM
I measure each property with go ilawn. I save a screen shot photo, save a google image screen shot, and all other related files to each customer's dedicated folder with auto backup to external hard drive.

scottslawncareav
02-14-2012, 11:29 AM
i would average the 2 unless it was a real shrp angle then i would guestimate. but first decide how many inches your going with, divide that number by 12. then multiply your the 2 widths add them together. multiply it buy the first number you found. for example 60 x 65= 3900 if you where going 2.5 in then 2.5/12= .208 so .208 x 3900=813 so there are 27 cubic feet in a yard 813/27= 30.11111 so 30. Now if there is a circular bed that you would find the average distance across the whole circle say it was 35 feet end to end every way you measured (a perfect circle) you would multiply 35 x35= 1225 then multiply it by .785= 961.625 go with 2.5 in again 961 x .208= 199.9 = 200/27= 7.4

CUSTOMLAWN10
02-14-2012, 04:02 PM
Keep it simple. I gotto the point where topsoil and mulch are 1" for every 300 square feet. Divide your square feet by 300 and that will give you a total at 1" multiply that by the inches and then I use a multiplier of 5% 10% 15% based on difficulty of install. So, with perrenials I use 15%, because you want to keep the mulch off the leaves and flowers, therefore you have to do with handfulls. A bed on a hill and tough wheeling it up the hill but easy spread 10% I hope this makes sense.

Runner
02-15-2012, 02:36 AM
If you have a property that all the sides are different lengths, you do this. you take the two lengths, add them, then divide by 2. You then take the two widths, add them, then divide by 2. You then take THESE two numbers, and multiply. What you are doing is multiplying the average length times the average width.

RickL1700
02-15-2012, 03:10 AM
Wow, thanks fellas I think you've all helped me cover any/all scenario's that I may encounter. I appreciate all of your help.
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cpllawncare
02-15-2012, 03:27 AM
www.goilawn.com


I use go ilawn most of the time. Can bid for mainteanance, design irrigation systems, measure linear distance, and of course find the exact square footage.

What about beds for mulch jobs and such?

scottslawncareav
02-15-2012, 04:28 PM
what do you mean the planter beds? i thought that is what we were all talking about?

TheChiefsLawnCare
02-19-2012, 05:17 PM
Ok, I'm really confused lol. I'm putting mulch down in a garden bed that is 21ft long by 8 feet deep. That's 168 sq ft. So I did the math earlier without the site and I came up with 28 3 cubic ft bags. However, I used this site http://www.gardenplace.com/content/calculator/mulch_calc.html#
and they are telling me I only need 3 bags. That's just does not seem right. What do you guys think. I figured doing the mulch 6 in thick just so I don't under estimate.

TheChiefsLawnCare
02-19-2012, 05:24 PM
just to make sure I am doing this right. my formula is 21x8x1/2 which gives me 84 cubic feet. So if I figure each bag holds 3 cubic feet so I will divide 84 into 3 which gives me 28. So that would mean I need 28, 3 cubic feet bags of mulch. Someone tell me if I'm doing this wrong.

TheChiefsLawnCare
02-19-2012, 05:43 PM
nvm you can scratch that. i wasnt putting the right thickness in.

cpllawncare
02-19-2012, 08:32 PM
nvm you can scratch that. i wasnt putting the right thickness in.

Garbage in garbage out

scottslawncareav
02-19-2012, 08:48 PM
why would you buy bags if you want 28 bags at 3 cuft a bag thats a little over 3 yards which you will get cheaper buy the scoop.

mathteacherj
02-19-2012, 11:03 PM
I use this (http://www.daftlogic.com/projects-google-maps-area-calculator-tool.htm) for square footage of the yard.

As far as the mulch beds, I just segments from walking it out and subtracting an approximate percentage to account for plants, etc.

wz2p7j
02-20-2012, 09:17 PM
The square footage of a yard is 9 square feet!

A yard is a measure of volume. Nine square feet is a measure of area, so you can't convert one to the other.

A cubic yard is 27 cubic feet.

Chris

appalachianoutdoors
02-20-2012, 09:45 PM
nvm you can scratch that. i wasnt putting the right thickness in.

Good to helpful tools at the top of the lawnsite.com homepage and there is a calculator to use unless it has been taken down. Hope this helps. :usflag:

CozyHollow
02-21-2012, 05:13 PM
New Biz starting this Spring. I've been asking a lot of questions and read thru A LOT of these posts throughout. I'm from the NE and landscapers up here are charging $175.00 to cut an acre. 1/3 acre - $65.00. I see some here posting that they charge "per hour"? Now I'm going solo and plan to keep it that way...we'll see what the Biz does.

Generally speaking, when giving an estimate, I will walk the property and let the customer know that I'm bidding for a cut, trim, edge and blow. Get that price down and then add hedge trimming, etc. if they desire.

Now tell me if I'm wrong but when bidding on residential properties it's pretty much shooting from the hip, no? I mean I want to stay within the financial parameters of the industry and DO NOT want to be a fly by...I want to establish a reputable business that LAAAAASTS. So some here may want to thrash me to pieces for stating what I just did...all I'm doing is trying to GAIN as much knowledge so that I DO NOT under bid the industry and also DO NOT OVER price my customer.

Any input is MUCH appreciated!

phillie
02-21-2012, 06:33 PM
New Biz starting this Spring. I've been asking a lot of questions and read thru A LOT of these posts throughout. I'm from the NE and landscapers up here are charging $175.00 to cut an acre. 1/3 acre - $65.00. I see some here posting that they charge "per hour"? Now I'm going solo and plan to keep it that way...we'll see what the Biz does.

Generally speaking, when giving an estimate, I will walk the property and let the customer know that I'm bidding for a cut, trim, edge and blow. Get that price down and then add hedge trimming, etc. if they desire.

Now tell me if I'm wrong but when bidding on residential properties it's pretty much shooting from the hip, no? I mean I want to stay within the financial parameters of the industry and DO NOT want to be a fly by...I want to establish a reputable business that LAAAAASTS. So some here may want to thrash me to pieces for stating what I just did...all I'm doing is trying to GAIN as much knowledge so that I DO NOT under bid the industry and also DO NOT OVER price my customer.

Any input is MUCH appreciated!

My input would be to start your own thread asking these questions. You said you searched but I am fairly sure there is over 1000 threads on the subjects you brought up. FYI-if your shooting from the hip with out years of experience you will be gone before you know it.

CozyHollow
02-21-2012, 08:24 PM
My input would be to start your own thread asking these questions. You said you searched but I am fairly sure there is over 1000 threads on the subjects you brought up. FYI-if your shooting from the hip with out years of experience you will be gone before you know it.

Thanks. What I meant by "shooting from the hip" was if I see a lawn that's 1/3 acre of uninterrupted turf, its a no brainer, $65.00. If it's multi level with a hillside, barriers, little sections etc. the price will vary depending. Don't want to under cut the industry OR over price either. Some of us "have it" and some of us don't. I worked a handful of years in the Tree business as a ground grunt. I can price any tree anywhere and nail it exactly every single time. How? By the knowledge I've gained throughout the years of asking questions.

My neighbor has an 80' oak in her back yard. We live in a tight quartered neighborhood on quarter acre lots. When her grandson asked me off the hook what it would cost...I told him 8 grand. He liked to drop! He said all wide eyed and frazzled with intensity, "That's EXACTLY what every tree guy she got an estimate from said". So "shooting from the hip" was a way of saying "I'm not going to waste customers time by trying to shine them on." I'll simply allow my confidence, knowledge and appearance to 'sell' my services as I give them a fair market price. I'll get PLENTY of customers but will never "kiss a--" in order to do so. :rolleyes: