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View Full Version : Is this strong enough for a Mowing truck?


pattytastik
02-08-2012, 05:52 PM
I have a 5x8 trailer and an exmark 36, a couple of 21s and weedwackers, blowers etc. Would this truck be able to efficiently pull all of that?

http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/cto/2808063491.html

I really like the mileage (duh) and it apparently gets around 23 highway mpg, and I need to commute from Philly to Binghamton NY pretty frequently so I am looking for fuel efficiency. The fact that it's 2wd doesn't really matter that much since I don't do snow removal.

WHIPPLE5.7
02-08-2012, 05:59 PM
Ditch the tall tires and it will be fine. No phone number. You sure that ad is for real.
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klcjustin
02-08-2012, 06:01 PM
It will get the job done for that size trailer and set up. Not fast by any means. I would take those tires off and get regular tires. You will have no room for expansion or if you decide to get into larger loads to carry.

pattytastik
02-08-2012, 06:42 PM
How would smaller tires affect anything? I really like the tires and rims lol
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sjessen
02-08-2012, 06:52 PM
You should be fine with that truck. My son pulled a setup like you are describing with a '85 Honda Accord with no problems. The larger than stock tires changes the rear end ratio casuing the engine to be less powerful. If you get the truck and it seems doggy try putting stock tires on it. One thing though, if it is an automatic you may experience early failure from towing with oversized tires. If it is a stick you may have problems with the clutch.

weesa20
02-08-2012, 07:22 PM
will be fine but lame that it is 2wd drive w/ offroad suspension and those tires

pattytastik
02-08-2012, 07:24 PM
Yeah I hear what you all are saying. I guess I'll just stick with my Dodge Dakota 4x4

sjessen
02-08-2012, 07:26 PM
You might think about saving up for a Tacoma. They are pretty tough trucks and get decent economy.

pattytastik
02-08-2012, 07:27 PM
You might think about saving up for a Tacoma. They are pretty tough trucks and get decent economy.

Yeah I would love to get a tacoma, they get amazing economy and they last a lifetime. Except the price is very steep.

Landrus2
02-08-2012, 07:30 PM
How would smaller tires affect anything? I really like the tires and rims lol
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Those tires are going to wear your bearing lot quicker :waving::waving:

KS_Grasscutter
02-08-2012, 07:33 PM
If you do any snow removal at all you will want a 4x4. I'd usually say to get a half ton at least but a Dakota or Colorado would pull your trailer around just fine.
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sjessen
02-08-2012, 07:33 PM
Another option is the older, smaller Tundra's. Not quite as good economy but are considered full size.

weeze
02-08-2012, 09:06 PM
yeah it will work. i pull a bigger trailer and heavier mower with my 4 cylinder truck.

http://i52.tinypic.com/207rwgn.jpg

Valk
02-09-2012, 11:10 AM
Taller tires can interfere with your braking ability...and offset the truck's computer controlled air/fuel program/mixtures as it is set at the factory for stock sized tires. Exceeding even 5% in circumference is not recommended without modifications IE rearend differential ring & pinion gearing & possibly stronger brakes.
And obviously the odometer and speedometer would be offset.

MensingMowingPlus
02-09-2012, 12:25 PM
I had a 2007 canyon with the 2.9l inline 4. The engine is a beast! I used it to tow a 5x8 and a 6x10 with a 32 ferris two push mowers and other equipment. The most i event towed was a pallet of calcium chloride. It pulled fine. I have a v6 silverado now and get about the same mileage though because it does have to work as hard to pull a mowing rig but i miss parking and the turning of the canyon.

BrunoT
02-10-2012, 03:22 AM
How would smaller tires affect anything? I really like the tires and rims lol
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1. Huge grossly oversized tires/wheels raise your effective gear ratio, reducing pulling power. They're also much heavier and with centrifigul force, etc greatly slow the vehicle and increase braking distances. I'm sure others could add disadvantages with these setups.

2. They also fry transmissions, especially wimpy ones that come on 4 cyl trucks. Your truck was designed to work with wheels within a certain size range.

3. They make you look like a clown when people realize your jacked up truck would get stuck in a deep mud puddle with 2wd.

4. The "look at me, I'm a mud bogger on weekends" image may not be what serious customers are looking for. It will also emphasize your youth, which may not be a plus.

But yes, even a small pickup can handle the 1600 lbs or so that would weigh. So could most family sedans, actually. That's pretty light.


btw, a tranny rebuild is about $2500. Keep that in mind.

Richard Martin
02-10-2012, 06:50 AM
You should be fine with that truck. My son pulled a setup like you are describing with a '85 Honda Accord with no problems. The larger than stock tires changes the rear end ratio casuing the engine to be less powerful.

The power will be the same, the torque (pulling ability) is greatly reduced by using the large tires. Dump the large tires at your first opportunity. It'll look a whole lot less redneck too. It will also get better gas mileage with the correct diameter tire too.

Power is how fast you hit a wall, torque is how far you move the wall after you hit it.

sjessen
02-10-2012, 07:50 AM
The power will be the same, the torque (pulling ability) is greatly reduced by using the large tires. Dump the large tires at your first opportunity. It'll look a whole lot less redneck too. It will also get better gas mileage with the correct diameter tire too.

Power is how fast you hit a wall, torque is how far you move the wall after you hit it.

Richard, Thanks.

Richard Martin
02-10-2012, 08:08 AM
Richard, Thanks.

Here's a really good example. We all know how fast house cats are. Significantly faster than a human. Now a house cat can reach out and slap you with a paw so fast that you can't get out of the way. And except for the claws, you don't hardly feel it. The cat can move it's whole leg faster than you can react but it has nothing behind it. That's power. Now if a human were to do the same thing, you may be able to get out of the way but if you don't, it may knock you out. That's torque.

themaintenanceman
02-10-2012, 08:20 AM
have you thought of a van or mini-van. I would love to get a church van leave one or two rows of seats and set it up for a mowing crew.

clydebusa
02-10-2012, 08:23 AM
Ditch the tall tires and it will be fine. No phone number. You sure that ad is for real.
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My thought also,, I would probably pass.

ralph02813
02-10-2012, 08:42 AM
The tires will hurt your gas mileage in the long run and do what everyone else has said plus wear out really quickly in highway driving!

BestImpressions99
02-10-2012, 11:40 AM
First I would question why he's getting rid of it (27k miles and the extras like suspension and tires... big uhoh for me). Second, since you already have a truck, save a little while longer and get a Toyota or Nissan. Yeah yeah lots of guys on here with domestic trucks but even they would agree that if you're going to go small on the truck, Toyota or Nissan would be the way to go.

cgaengineer
02-22-2012, 07:20 AM
You might think about saving up for a Tacoma. They are pretty tough trucks and get decent economy.

A Tacoma would pull that setup just fine, that 4 banger Chevy engine is junk. And what's with those wheels anyway? Looks like someone really wanted a 4X4 and couldn't afford one.
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cgaengineer
02-22-2012, 07:25 AM
Yeah I would love to get a tacoma, they get amazing economy and they last a lifetime. Except the price is very steep.

You get what you pay for. I will say that fuel economy on a Tacoma is not great...in fact, I think you would be surprised to know that you will be lucky to get 16mpg not towing.

I've owned 3, down to two now.
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cgaengineer
02-22-2012, 07:37 AM
My Tacos

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e223/cgaengineer/4e01163d.jpg
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