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Ijustwantausername
02-14-2012, 03:31 PM
Against my will a customer wants me to seed with fescue in Feb. It is a relatively new lawn with Fescue already there, just not pretty. Fresh topsoil will be brought in for the areas I'm going to seed a few days before. Will a spreader be enough or do I need to go back over it with something to "rake" the seed into the dirt a little?

Reason I ask is because I was asked to strictly seed and fertilize, not rake seed into lawn.

Any tricks for doing that over a large area?

They will be able to water, also.

Also, their are some patches with nice fescue scattered about the lawn, any clue about why that is?

Thanks

RigglePLC
02-14-2012, 04:47 PM
Just my opinion. It would probably be too cold for good germination. Very slow. You want to wait until the fescue greens up or almost the date of the first mowing. Be sure the irrigation is up and running.

So...he wants to put the seed on top of the soil--and prefers not to put the soil on top of the seed? Why? Who is going to spread the soil evenly?

Be sure you are not responsible if results are poor. And correct whatever caused the problem in the first place. If you can't drag it a bit, or rake it in, I suggest you use double seed to be sure enough of it takes to give a good thick stand.

And don't let him use cheap seed Get the good stuff--disease resistant. And don't local universities recommend 10 percent bluegrass to add self-repair ability?

Nice fescue in patches? Perhaps a mix was seeded and the toughest survived last year's heat and fungus when they didn't water.

Ijustwantausername
02-14-2012, 05:43 PM
Just my opinion. It would probably be too cold for good germination. Very slow. You want to wait until the fescue greens up or almost the date of the first mowing. Be sure the irrigation is up and running.

So...he wants to put the seed on top of the soil--and prefers not to put the soil on top of the seed? Why? Who is going to spread the soil evenly?

Be sure you are not responsible if results are poor. And correct whatever caused the problem in the first place. If you can't drag it a bit, or rake it in, I suggest you use double seed to be sure enough of it takes to give a good thick stand.

And don't let him use cheap seed Get the good stuff--disease resistant. And don't local universities recommend 10 percent bluegrass to add self-repair ability?

Nice fescue in patches? Perhaps a mix was seeded and the toughest survived last year's heat and fungus when they didn't water.

Riggle, yeah you are right, I personally think its too cold as well. However, our fescue at the house has greened up and we have mowed it twice this year, also soil temp is at 45 degrees. We have had some abnormally warm days and the air temp has been around 60 degrees for the past while, with some days close to or at 70.

As far as the seed being cast on top of the soil, I guess I will just suck it up and lightly rake over the areas. But yes to answer your question, I assume they would just be satisfied with the seed being spread on top of the bare soil.

Another thing, they don't have a sprinkler system, but said they could water, so we all know what that means - probably be using a cheap Lowes or Home Depot rig without measuring the amount, I will inform them of this as well.

I haven't heard about the bluegrass for self repair?

agrostis
02-14-2012, 10:10 PM
This sound's like a recipe for failure. Can you post any picture's ? It usually get's too hot for bluegrass this far south.

Ijustwantausername
02-14-2012, 10:16 PM
This sound's like a recipe for failure. Can you post any picture's ? It usually get's too hot for bluegrass this far south.

Yeah I know, no worries though, I called back and rescheduled for a later date, and proposed a different way. It was a spur of the moment type customer, I just had to inform them the right way of doing things. I am actually going back out to reassess so I will try to snap a few pics then.

RigglePLC
02-15-2012, 10:57 PM
Customers cannot be depended on to water. No guarantee without an irrigation system. Read his water meter before you start and after...so he can't lie about how many gallons of water he used. Ask to see his water bills also. There should be a big increase during the month the grass goes in.

Also this is a good spot for a battery-operated sprinkler timer. Inexpensive--and it will save you a lot of problems. With good pressure, a splitter, and two impulse sprinklers you can irrigate two 80 foot circles. Set it for an hour a day.

I would put the topsoil on top of the seed.

RigglePLC
02-16-2012, 02:36 PM
The bluegrass Bandara is a good choice for mixing with tall fescue. It is a cross between bluegrass and Texas bluegrass; it can stand up to heat, and gives fescue better thickness.
http://www.pickseed.com/usa/varieties/index.html

RigglePLC
02-16-2012, 04:27 PM
A premium tall fescue seed would be a good idea. Self Repair Potential (SRP). Costs more, but explain to the customer--it is well worth a few extra dollars. Be sure it has good brown patch resistance, whatever you use.
http://www.turfmerchants.com/turf_type_tall_fescue/3rd-millenium.php

Add bluegrass for tighter sod.

Ijustwantausername
02-16-2012, 04:49 PM
A premium tall fescue seed would be a good idea. Self Repair Potential (SRP). Costs more, but explain to the customer--it is well worth a few extra dollars. Be sure it has good brown patch resistance, whatever you use.
http://www.turfmerchants.com/turf_type_tall_fescue/3rd-millenium.php

Add bluegrass for tighter sod.

Thanks for those links. Any idea how much a bag costs?

Also, I measured the lawn today and it was 10,697 sq ft. For an 18-20-12 fertilizer, what's the formula to know how much I will need?

RigglePLC
02-16-2012, 11:03 PM
I would use the whole 50 pound bag. It contains 9 pounds of nitrogen, and 10 pounds phosphorus. You need just over 10 pounds of nitrogen and plenty of phosphorus.

I don't know how much a 50 pound bag of premium seed costs. I would say between $65 and $90.

Here is a link:
http://www.seedland.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=Seedland&Category_Code=FES-XRE-KBG

cpllawncare
02-18-2012, 02:09 AM
Thanks for those links. Any idea how much a bag costs?

Also, I measured the lawn today and it was 10,697 sq ft. For an 18-20-12 fertilizer, what's the formula to know how much I will need?

Should say on the bag.

JBNC
02-18-2012, 09:50 AM
I would definitely wait a few weeks until maybe the middle of March. We've been known to have some crazy weather around here and a bad cold snap could really screw up all your efforts. Regardless, I would rake it in to the new topsoil or existing soil.

You said there is some nice fescue in patches? What is in the other areas? dirt? bermuda? weeds?

jsslawncare
02-18-2012, 09:56 AM
I was talking with some other LCO's last week and we all decided to go ahead with the fescue plans in Feb because of the lack of winter we have had this year.

cpllawncare
02-18-2012, 10:41 AM
Good luck I would seed then put down the top soil

wkbrafford
02-18-2012, 10:15 PM
They say fescue would not be a good idea to overseed in the spring because of the time it has to mature before the heat hits it. Was planning on overseeding the yard with fescue which i previously planted winter rye at last november. I posted in another thread but would like to have input from all angles. I was not going to aerate the lawn just mow it low, rake it since it does not need dethatching and throw some starter fert down. There are also a few patches where they were tree stumps which were grinded into mulch but is mixed with topsoil a little. The winter rye did not come up heavy in those areas. Do you believe should bring some topsoil in and till into the areas that rye did not fully before i throw some seed down? Was planning on planting the fescue in the end of Feb and beginning of march to give it a good root hold before the dog days of summer come around. What do yall guys think should be done.