PDA

View Full Version : Cost to repack bearings 5 x 10 trailer


khutch
02-22-2012, 09:41 AM
What would be a reasonable cost to repack bearings 5 x 10 trailer. I probably should be doing this myself but sometimes the time and effort can be put towards things that you are good at.....Trailer has about 12,000 miles on it - How often is a repack recommended? All neighborhood driving, no interstate travel.

aaron79mowing
02-22-2012, 09:52 AM
You are wanting to just regrease them? A assume you don't have grease zerks on your hubs. All you need to do is replace the dust covers on your hubs with bearing buddy caps. These have fittings built in and you can easily grease them once a year or so with your lube gun.

unkownfl
02-22-2012, 10:29 AM
Invest in bearing buddys and a grease gun. You can do it in about 10 minutes.

dhardin53
02-22-2012, 12:16 PM
Facts being you live in a part of the country that dose not have much snow/salt and your mowing season may be a little longer than mine here in Illinois. I cant see the need for repacking wheels unless you hear or see a problem when changing tires. If you carrie a over sized load for the trailer rating. And if your typical mowing day has hours of travel time. The biggest problem with wheel bearings are when you go long distance with a heavy load, this is called over heating. Small loads with short runs one would think you should go 20 or 30.000 miles.

But this is if all thing being equal. I myself would save my money for gas this year. Plus I would do it myself, but that is just me...

32vld
02-22-2012, 12:45 PM
Problem with youngsters that came on line in life post rwd cars that hand drum brakes or early disc brakes that had their wheel bearings repacked with every brake job.

If you were hard on your brakes this meant your bearings got greased every 10,000 - 15,000 miles.

Or like me you went up to 68,000 miles. I never had a bearing go bad from going past the 30,000 factory sevice interval for repacking the bearings.

Most of the problem from bearings going bad is from people smearing grease over the surface of the bearing. That is not packing a bearing.

Then you have the people making a bearing to loose or tight.

orangemower
02-22-2012, 12:54 PM
The time it takes to repack the bearings is nothing if you let them go to the point that they fail. Then you may have to buy a new axle as the bearing can and will destroy the spindle if you let them go too long. I know this first hand. I sold off my first trailer after this happened and the new one I have now has bearing buddies on it. A few pumps and its good to go. They're cheap and can be had at most trailer shops.
Posted via Mobile Device

jtsnipe
02-22-2012, 05:45 PM
In my opinion bearing buddies are a gimmick.I'v seen them packed full(fill slide plate all the way out)and still saw the bearing burn up.If you don"t have a zerk on the end of your axle putting grease in the hubs,pull the hubs clean and repack.And deffinatly install new seals.

khutch
02-24-2012, 11:27 AM
Thanks for the replies - As usual quite a difference of opinions. Think I'll pass on the bearing buddies from what I've heard. Back to the orginal question - What is the typical cost to repack for this size trailer? I was quoted $160 which sounded a bit high. I know it is a pretty easy job, sometimes don't mind paying to have someone else do it, esp. when I have never done it and would not mind getting it done in a couple of hours and not deal with the learning curve.

khutch
02-24-2012, 11:28 AM
Thanks for the replies - As usual quite a difference of opinions. Think I'll pass on the bearing buddies from what I've heard. Back to the orginal question - What is the typical cost to repack for this size trailer? I was quoted $160 which sounded a bit high. I know it is a pretty easy job, sometimes don't mind paying to have someone else do it, esp. when I have never done it and would not mind getting it done in a couple of hours and not deal with the learning curve.

Restrorob
02-24-2012, 12:00 PM
I was quoted $160 which sounded a bit high.


http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/images/smilies/jawdrop.gif Tell um to knock 110 bux off that ridiculous price and you'll think about it..... :dizzy:

TMlawncare
02-24-2012, 12:01 PM
I had one axle done this winter. It was $80. The other axle we had trailer brakes installed so they did the axle bearings on it as part of the package. DOT says brakes on both axles, trailer only had brakes on one. Btw, trailer has 50,000 miles on it and this was the first time we have had the axles repacked.

ringahding
02-24-2012, 12:04 PM
Actually $160 is not that high. If you actually took your trailer to a place that sell trailers, you would be looking @ around $300. But yeah you can do it in 10 or 15 minutes......YouTube tutorials will walk you through the process. Food for thought for the next time.

jtsnipe
02-24-2012, 05:23 PM
My main problem with a shop doing the job is the quality.Were the bearings full and the hub filled?15 minutes is a little conservative,but 1-2 hrs.for the job thats messy and not that complicated I'd just do it myself.

Camaro865
02-24-2012, 06:58 PM
just take it apart and put it back together the same way. when you tighten the castle nut keep checking the play in the wheel and go until the wheel has no play and put the pin back in. if it lands in a place that you cant put the pin in spin it back out a notch.

5 bucks in grease and your done

dboyd351
02-24-2012, 07:28 PM
In my opinion bearing buddies are a gimmick.I'v seen them packed full(fill slide plate all the way out)and still saw the bearing burn up.If you don"t have a zerk on the end of your axle putting grease in the hubs,pull the hubs clean and repack.And deffinatly install new seals.

Bearing buddies are most certainly not a joke, especially if you use them on a boat trailer in salt water. I've been using them for over 30 years with virtually no problems. You do need to read the directions, though. If you fill them full, the grease will expand as it heats up and you'll blow the seal out the backside - then the bearing will fail.
The spring is there to keep the pressure on the grease and to keep water out, but you can't fill it to where the spring is collapsed or it can't do it's job.

Patriot Services
02-24-2012, 07:44 PM
The shop should be removing, soaking, cleaning out the hub and changing the seal. Most shops have a 1 hour minumum shop charge. I would think a hundred would be fair. Maybe throw in a tire balance. A 100 dollar trailer tuneup. There's a good promotion for a shop in a trailer busy area.:usflag:

piston slapper
02-24-2012, 07:49 PM
http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/images/smilies/jawdrop.gif Tell um to knock 110 bux off that ridiculous price and you'll think about it..... :dizzy:

Time to get a new flat rate manual????.........Hmmmm........should take about 8 minutes.
Posted via Mobile Device

unkownfl
02-24-2012, 08:31 PM
If your really scared of doing it, you can buy a tool that packs the bearings for you.

ed2hess
02-24-2012, 09:24 PM
You might as well start learning how to do repair on these trailers because they will eat you money. Packing takes about an hour. Next it will be brakes then trailer lights not working and on and on. Today one of our trucks came in and the no lights working on the trailer. Two 10amp fuses out in the truck:dizzy: Last week same trailer different truck the brakes didn't work. The life time warranty brake controller was toast.

32vld
02-24-2012, 10:28 PM
Thanks for the replies - As usual quite a difference of opinions. Think I'll pass on the bearing buddies from what I've heard. Back to the orginal question - What is the typical cost to repack for this size trailer? I was quoted $160 which sounded a bit high. I know it is a pretty easy job, sometimes don't mind paying to have someone else do it, esp. when I have never done it and would not mind getting it done in a couple of hours and not deal with the learning curve.

Wheel off, pack bearings, wheel on, done in 15 minutes. So single axle trailer 1/2 hour.

Came back to edit to add this: If you know how to do it you can remove the grease seals without damaging them and reuse them.

jtsnipe
02-25-2012, 07:21 AM
Bearing buddies are most certainly not a joke, especially if you use them on a boat trailer in salt water. I've been using them for over 30 years with virtually no problems. You do need to read the directions, though. If you fill them full, the grease will expand as it heats up and you'll blow the seal out the backside - then the bearing will fail.
The spring is there to keep the pressure on the grease and to keep water out, but you can't fill it to where the spring is collapsed or it can't do it's job.I did'nt say they were a joke,but there not much better than a dust cap.It was on a boat trailer that I witnessed the failure.I personally greased my friends bearing buddies before a 200 mile trip back home and with about 50 miles left I saw sparks in the rear view mirror.When I helped him rebuild two of the hubs the next day they were totally dry,bearing buddies full.
Proper maintenance once a year will keep any trailer going a long time.He pitched the buddies after the failure and has'nt had another problem in the last ten years.

jtsnipe
02-25-2012, 07:39 AM
Wheel off, pack bearings, wheel on, done in 15 minutes. So single axle trailer 1/2 hour.

Came back to edit to add this: If you know how to do it you can remove the grease seals without damaging them and reuse them.

Seals are cheap,just make a note of the size and keep it in your records,pick them up before the job.

cpllawncare
02-25-2012, 08:42 AM
If you don't know how to repack a bearing, I'm sure there is a video on youtube that will walk you through it.

PTP
02-25-2012, 09:37 AM
Last I checked, it was about $30 to buy a new hub - hub, bearings, races, seals, and cap. That is for a non-braking axle.

Learn how to grease your own bearings. It will be well worth it in the end. And, when a bearing does fail, just replace the whole hub, repack the new bearings, and be done with it.

The time wasted at the shop alone would make learning to do it yourself worth it. Never mind the price.

orangemower
02-25-2012, 09:50 AM
Wheel off, pack bearings, wheel on, done in 15 minutes. So single axle trailer 1/2 hour.

Came back to edit to add this: If you know how to do it you can remove the grease seals without damaging them and reuse them.


I've worked as a auto tech for over 30 years and even I can't "properly" disassemble, clean the bearings and hubs and repack and assemble in that amount of time and I'm very fast and efficient.
Posted via Mobile Device

Patriot Services
02-25-2012, 11:02 AM
I've worked as a auto tech for over 30 years and even I can't "properly" disassemble, clean the bearings and hubs and repack and assemble in that amount of time and I'm very fast and efficient.
Posted via Mobile Device

32VID works in the Nascar pits.
Posted via Mobile Device

White Gardens
02-25-2012, 11:12 AM
As for duration in-between packing, I do mine once a year. Just a little insurance as far as I'm concerned.

That and there will always be some sort of moisture getting into the hub regardless.

...

unkownfl
02-25-2012, 01:10 PM
I would say honestly it will take about 2 hours for your first time. By the time you find all the tools you need clean etc. put everything back.

Patriot Services
02-25-2012, 01:38 PM
As for duration in-between packing, I do mine once a year. Just a little insurance as far as I'm concerned.

That and there will always be some sort of moisture getting into the hub regardless.

...

We have buddies on all the trailers. Regardless the ocd in me tears them down twice a year. They see a fair amount of highway time and occaisonal heavy loads. A day hardly goes by that I don't see a trailer on the side of the road with a wheel stripped to the axle. Not the place I want to mess with a burnt bearing.
Posted via Mobile Device

jtsnipe
02-25-2012, 02:02 PM
We have buddies on all the trailers. Regardless the ocd in me tears them down twice a year. They see a fair amount of highway time and occaisonal heavy loads. A day hardly goes by that I don't see a trailer on the side of the road with a wheel stripped to the axle. Not the place I want to mess with a burnt bearing.
Posted via Mobile DeviceAmen brother

REALSIMPLE101
02-25-2012, 02:35 PM
Once a year the trailer bearings need to be repacked and grease seals replaced. Bearing buddies are great for boat trailers that go into water and need the grease to push the water out. To each their own way. Too much grease and too little grease high heat bad news for wheel bearings. Same goes with pressure on the bearing to much torque or not enough bad news. Hope that helps.

greydog4u2
02-25-2012, 07:18 PM
just take it apart and put it back together the same way. when you tighten the castle nut keep checking the play in the wheel and go until the wheel has no play and put the pin back in. if it lands in a place that you cant put the pin in spin it back out a notch.

5 bucks in grease and your done

I agree just some people have no mechanical abilities. in this business the more the better

32vld
02-25-2012, 08:49 PM
Seals are cheap,just make a note of the size and keep it in your records,pick them up before the job.

If you don't damage them you are wasting money replacing them. My dad was a mechanic before the war, the big one. For over 50 years he never had a problem from the times he reused grease seals. Yes there was times he used new seals.

ricky86
02-26-2012, 02:56 AM
I've worked as a auto tech for over 30 years and even I can't "properly" disassemble, clean the bearings and hubs and repack and assemble in that amount of time and I'm very fast and efficient.
Posted via Mobile Device

After 25 posts, somebody actually knows how to service a trailer axle.

khutch
02-26-2012, 12:09 PM
The orginal question WAS - How much? I was quoted $160, some say too high, others about right and maybe one said that was low. I'm going come away with it as more than I'd want to pay, but a trailer shop should do it without me messing anything up, so it is kind of the price of doing business.
The other question was how often? Only put about 5k of miles on a year and this trailer is way under 20k low load, non-highway miles so I'm thinking it will last one more year. I understand every year is good for some but my situation is different. One post had 50k and still going - don't thing I'll push it that far.
As usual, posts all over the place - Not sure I understand advice from some one who says he can do his in 15 min. Well that's great, but I can't do it nor can most people. I can do some things but not a lot of others things - If you can do everything yourself more power to you - You are better than me. Sure, I save some money and do my own hydro fluid replacemant and filter change. Few other things, but have found out I'll just take care of things and they will last but when a carb needs fixin' I'll pay for it, it won't break the bank, and hopefully it will be done right the first time.

32vld
02-26-2012, 04:44 PM
The orginal question WAS - How much? I was quoted $160, some say too high, others about right and maybe one said that was low. I'm going come away with it as more than I'd want to pay, but a trailer shop should do it without me messing anything up, so it is kind of the price of doing business.
The other question was how often? Only put about 5k of miles on a year and this trailer is way under 20k low load, non-highway miles so I'm thinking it will last one more year. I understand every year is good for some but my situation is different. One post had 50k and still going - don't thing I'll push it that far.
As usual, posts all over the place - Not sure I understand advice from some one who says he can do his in 15 min. Well that's great, but I can't do it nor can most people. I can do some things but not a lot of others things - If you can do everything yourself more power to you - You are better than me. Sure, I save some money and do my own hydro fluid replacemant and filter change. Few other things, but have found out I'll just take care of things and they will last but when a carb needs fixin' I'll pay for it, it won't break the bank, and hopefully it will be done right the first time.

30 minutes, at 15 minutes per wheel is for someone that has an impact gun and can tell what size socket to use just by looking at the lug nuts without trying a few test fits to get the right socket. Because he has done this some many times before.

15 minutes for the guy that has a lift or professional floor jack so he's not wasting time getting the wheels off the ground.

15 minutes for the guy that knows how to knock out the grease seal without damaging it when he removes the wheel hub/drum all at once.

15 minutes for the guy that has what ever lubricants he needs right at his finger tips under or on his bench not wasting time looking for that tub of grease.

15 minutes for the guy that can put a load of grease in his palm and work the grease into one end of the bearing between the rollers/balls forcing the old dirty grease out the other end of the bearing.

15 minutes for the guy that has tightened enough wheel bearing adjusting nuts that he does not need to waste time playing around with a torque wrench.

Now whether you want to pay someone to pack wheel bearings or you want to do it there is no wrong choice.

For those that can do it thing is they may opt to pay someone to do it because they can make more servicing their customers then what they could save doing themselves.

There are some that they have enough slack time why pay someone to do something while they sit on their but doing nothing.

Some that don't have the knowledge or experience.

Your original question was $160 too much. I have given a time frame for you to figure out if it is too much.

I'll assume your 5x10 trailer has one axle. So two wheels at 1/2 hour and they want 160 labor. That must be one expensive shop that they must be charging $320 hr labor.

As to the NASCAR remark I could never get a tire off and on as fast as them. Never used their specialized tools and equipment and if I did doing this once for the first time there is no way I is going to be as fast.

Though I will ask has any one ever owned a 1980's GM FWD car with the bad rack and pinion steering boxes?

Anyone ever change one themselves?

How much time did it take you?

The highest flat rate book time to R&R a steering rack was 5.8 hours. Many were in the 2.5 to 4.0 hr range.

I did so many of them I had every tool needed to do the job memorized. Not just which socket but which length extension.

I did so many of them I bought the specialized tools that would make me faster. Example metric flare wrench crow foots for the line fittings.

I did so many of them that I would get them done in 45 minutes.
Once just for the fun of it I went as fast as I could just to see how fast I could be.

35 minutes, car on lift, car off lift. And no I was not that fast because the car fell of the lift when I was done.

You ever watch a chef on tv chopping up food with a knife during a cooking competition. I can't and you can't handle a knife that fast. They can because they do that every day.

GM had so many bad steering racks that I was doing at least one a day for the longest of time.

I don't know how many hours your trailer shop is charging but for them to be charging you $160 their charging you for more then 1 hr:

It's because they are not honest.

Their mechanics are not very experienced.

Their mechanics are not very competent.

All three.

Restrorob
02-26-2012, 05:16 PM
I don't know how many hours your trailer shop is charging but for them to be charging you $160 their charging you for more then 1 hr:

It's because they are not honest.

Their mechanics are not very experienced.

Their mechanics are not very competent.

All three.



I'll go with all three..... http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/images/smilies/yepp.gif

Chilehead
02-26-2012, 05:19 PM
http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/images/smilies/jawdrop.gif Tell um to knock 110 bux off that ridiculous price and you'll think about it..... :dizzy:

No kidding. I can get a brand new hub for $25.00 from Northern Tool!

32vld
02-26-2012, 05:49 PM
And quite often you don't need an impact gun because you can remove the wheel and hub/brakedrum together as one unit.

jtsnipe
02-26-2012, 06:22 PM
After 25 posts, somebody actually knows how to service a trailer axle.Ricky,Ive been servicing hubs on cars,trucks and trailers since the 70's with an excellent success rate but was trying to get the person to do the maintenance themselves.Yes you need to clean,pack,replace seals but other posters gave coaching tips for the op. to find a link.
I find your advice help-full most of the time but that's just insulting.
:hammerhead:

ricky86
02-26-2012, 06:41 PM
khutch, it should take about an hour, give or take a bit. Price will depend on their shop rate. Sometimes low usage is worse than high. Follow the trailer's makers schedule. Maybe a little less. The brgs should be inspected and the seals should be replaced.
Although it's temping, but I'm not going to get into a war over vehicle repairs playing "Beat the Clock". In our shop, the speed demons are all gone. Very very few individuals can be truly quick and keep quality up. Very few. But that's just my opinion

ricky86
02-26-2012, 06:48 PM
Ricky,Ive been servicing hubs on cars,trucks and trailers since the 70's with an excellent success rate but was trying to get the person to do the maintenance themselves.Yes you need to clean,pack,replace seals but other posters gave coaching tips for the op. to find a link.
I find your advice help-full most of the time but that's just insulting.
:hammerhead:

I did not mean to insult you. I not quite sure how I did. IF I did *trucewhiteflag*

cpllawncare
02-26-2012, 07:05 PM
khutch, it should take about an hour, give or take a bit. Price will depend on their shop rate. Sometimes low usage is worse than high. Follow the trailer's makers schedule. Maybe a little less. The brgs should be inspected and the seals should be replaced.
Although it's temping, but I'm not going to get into a war over vehicle repairs playing "Beat the Clock". In our shop, the speed demons are all gone. Very very few individuals can be truly quick and keep quality up. Very few. But that's just my opinion

I really think that's true with about everything, "If you want it done right, it's expensive, if you want it done fast,it's more expensive if you want it done fast and right Well! that's REALLY expensive! so how about we just do it right?

jtsnipe
02-26-2012, 07:16 PM
I did not mean to insult you. I not quite sure how I did. IF I did *trucewhiteflag*It must have been the(25 posts and someone knows) comment.Sorry if I read it wrong,I thought I knew how to service bearings from way before the first post.

jtsnipe
02-26-2012, 07:35 PM
I really think that's true with about everything, "If you want it done right, it's expensive, if you want it done fast,it's more expensive if you want it done fast and right Well! that's REALLY expensive! so how about we just do it right?If you want it done right you do it your self.

Restrorob
02-26-2012, 10:18 PM
If you want it done right you do it your self.


DING DING DING..... And we hav'a winn'a !!!!!!! :clapping:

32vld
02-27-2012, 12:47 PM
DING DING DING..... And we hav'a winn'a !!!!!!! :clapping:

No.

Their is nothing wrong with the person that has his reasons to send repair work out. Whether based on their the ability to do the work, can do it but would take them all day when a shop can do it in an hour, Do they have time to do it, better off spending money so they're free to be earning money, to how often do they need to do a repair to justify buying the tools needed to do it themselves.

I have done very little automatic transmission work. Most of the time it would be better for me to pay an expert to do this. Yes I could go to junky and swap out my bad one for a used one that may or may not last. But I'd rather have mine rebuilt with a guarantee.

The problem is the original poster has know idea that his repair shop guy is ripping him off. The responses to this thread were not what he wanted to hear, did not understand, or both, because he was still going to pay this guy $160 to have his bearings packed anyway.

jtsnipe
02-27-2012, 06:56 PM
No.

Their is nothing wrong with the person that has his reasons to send repair work out. Whether based on their the ability to do the work, can do it but would take them all day when a shop can do it in an hour, Do they have time to do it, better off spending money so they're free to be earning money, to how often do they need to do a repair to justify buying the tools needed to do it themselves.

I have done very little automatic transmission work. Most of the time it would be better for me to pay an expert to do this. Yes I could go to junky and swap out my bad one for a used one that may or may not last. But I'd rather have mine rebuilt with a guarantee.

The problem is the original poster has know idea that his repair shop guy is ripping him off. The responses to this thread were not what he wanted to hear, did not understand, or both, because he was still going to pay this guy $160 to have his bearings packed anyway.I'ts ok if the op dosn't want to get his hands dirty and feels the need to pay someone to do the dirty work.The way I look at it I get out of the house on a Sunday afternoon and do what I can to keep my money in my pocket.It dosn't all have to be done at the same time,two hours here two hours there.And yes,I rebuilt my own auto trans in my basement (still driving the truck now) not because I had to,because I wanted to.
It would cost op 10$ in seals and grease but yea 160$ would get it dun.

FullBlast
02-27-2012, 07:56 PM
Wheel bearings!! Wow what a subject. I have changed abunch of them, in the shop and on the road!!!

Yes you can reuse a seal, but you have to be careful with them.

No it doesn't take real long to do one. I think I could do one in 15 minutes in the shop but that would pushing pretty hard. If you haven't done it figure 30 minutes or a little better.

How much would it cost?? It is hard to say but $160 sounds a little high but if I didn't know what I was doing, I think it might be a good way to go. It is easy to over tighten the nut and then you will have bearing failure along the road and then you wish you would have.

But then again there is always a first time for everything and I am all for figuring it out yourself.

Good luck!!

Patriot Services
02-27-2012, 08:21 PM
Talk about reversing the heat. LCO's are always crying they don't get a fair price because customers don't understand overhead and paying for an experienced professional. Ask PistonSlapper or Restrorob what it costs to run a shop.
Posted via Mobile Device

dboyd351
02-27-2012, 08:30 PM
Talk about reversing the heat. LCO's are always crying they don't get a fair price because customers don't understand overhead and paying for an experienced professional. Ask PistonSlapper or Restrorob what it costs to run a shop.
Posted via Mobile Device

You're right about that. I can rebuild trailer wheel bearings for $30 in parts or rebuild a trimmer carb for $10, but you won't get any shop to touch those jobs w/o adding $50 or $100 in labor. If you can do the job yourself and want to save those labor rates, more power to you. Either learn to do it yourself or pay the piper.

jtsnipe
02-27-2012, 08:30 PM
Talk about reversing the heat. LCO's are always crying they don't get a fair price because customers don't understand overhead and paying for an experienced professional. Ask PistonSlapper or Restrorob what it costs to run a shop.
Posted via Mobile DeviceMaintenance is definitely not for all.