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Atlantic Lawn
12-12-2002, 06:42 AM
I just saw on TV, a gas can catch fire and it's owner with it, while standing in the back of his pick up truck. He was filmed on the security cam,if you get a chance to see it you'll get an awesome reminder of how important it is to fill cans outside of the truck.I guess it had a bed liner and the tank wasn't grounded.The guy jumps outa' the truck and runs around while a few other people try to put him out. He was 59 yrs old and has burns on a lot of his body now. I know this should be in the "off topic forum" but thought it would serve as a reminder to us all to take the can outa' the truck, I know I will.

stslawncare
12-12-2002, 08:15 AM
i have always heard that gas and bedliners dont mix, what exactly is it that causes the problem??? whats a solution for it?

greengrass2003
12-12-2002, 08:40 AM
static electricity causes the sprark that ignights the gas fumes. a few years ago a guy down in chester virginia, blew his truck and a gas pump up filling in his truck bed. I dont know if he is ok or not.

Robert ONeal

Quality Grounds Management

cajuncutter
12-12-2002, 08:41 AM
man that is horrible!! I have never heard of bed linners causing problems with fuel. Must be some sort of chemical reaction. I know at times I practice unsafe habbits around fuel. Also guys remember if you have your trailers exposed to the elements outside do not forget about the New Years comming up. Every new years and 4th of July I get nervous. I always store my cans inside the garage for fear some kids bottle rocket etc. will ignite too close to my gas cans.

Mr_Marc
12-12-2002, 10:04 AM
Cajuncutter I saw the same video. What a mess and I feel sorry for the man especially this time of year.

Safe tips for fueling portable gas cans.

No SMOKING MOTOR OFF!

1. Touch the side of the truck with your hand to discharge any static electricity.

2. Make sure the gas nozzle stays in contact with the can during the entire filling process.

3. Never use cell phone while filling any vehicle.

4. Always fill on the ground

5. Leave yourself an escape route

Practice and educate safe fueling habits

bubble boy
12-12-2002, 10:08 AM
fire extinguisher in truck always a good idea.

odin
12-12-2002, 10:14 AM
I seen a report about a lady who had a cell phone and somehow it cause her van to catch on fire while she was fulling up and talking on the cell phone at the same time.

plymouthvaliant73
12-12-2002, 11:40 AM
http://www.awtrucks.com/bedliner_warning.htm

Gasoline has a low electrical conductivity-- it does not conduct electricity very well. As a result, a charge of static electricity builds up on gasoline as it flows through a pipe or hose and this charge takes several seconds to several minutes to dissipate after the gasoline has reached a tank or container. If this charge discharges as a spark from a tank or container to the grounded metal nozzle of the gasoline dispenser hose, it may ignite the gasoline. Ignition requires that the spark occur near the tank opening where the gasoline vapor is in the flammable range.1 A spark discharge directly from the surface of the gasoline to the grounded nozzle also is possible. Normally, this will not result in ignition because the concentration of gasoline vapor near the liquid is above the flammable limit.

Joel B.
12-12-2002, 11:47 AM
Is there a danger when filling a plastic gas can sitting on a spray in bedliner? I always heard the danger was when filling a metal gas can sitting on a plastic bedliner.

Opinions?

Joel B.

SpudsM15
12-12-2002, 12:16 PM
WoW I'm scared to goto the gas station now!

1grnlwn
12-12-2002, 03:08 PM
A spray in bed liner would be same risk. The can can build static while you drive. Wind rushing past plastic=static. The bed liner is an insulator, the charge will not disapate unless the can touches a ground source, Concrete. This will occur more in winter time because of drier air. Happens to women more in winter because they get back in vehicle, creating more static.

Tony Harrell
12-13-2002, 05:48 AM
I saw that on the news a few minutes ago. It's VERY dramatic. Lesson: ground yourself while pumping fuel, don't fuel up in a hurry. They say the plastic cans are part of the problem. Does anyone here use metal fuel cans?

conepile
12-13-2002, 06:37 AM
Here is the story:


Error fuels base service station blaze

by James Coburn
37th Training Wing Public Affairs

LACKLAND AIR FORCE BASE, Texas (AFPN) -- A 50-year-old retired technical sergeant was severely burned on both legs recently after static electricity ignited gasoline as he filled gas cans in the bed of his pickup truck at the base shoppette here.

Lackland Fire Chief J.L. Ball said a placard on the gasoline pumps warns motorists to put gas cans on the ground to fill them, but people might not notice them.

In a video taken by the Army and Air Force Exchange Service store's security camera, four bystanders are shown frantically using their own clothing to help put out the flames burning on the man's gasoline-soaked pants legs and shoes.

Tech. Sgt. Ed Jones, a Warrior Week instructor and one of the bystanders, removed his battle dress uniform top and wrapped it around the man's legs to help extinguish the flames, but they kept re-igniting. Thinking quickly, he pulled a window cleaner reservoir from a rack at the pump and poured the water on the man's legs.

A shoppette mechanic rushed the man to nearby Wilford Hall Medical Center in his pickup. Jones, who accompanied the man, also was treated for minor burns he received as he smothered flames.

Safety officials long have warned people not to fill gas cans sitting inside vehicles or in truck beds because of the danger of gasoline vapors being ignited by static electricity.

Another hazard reported recently is getting back into a car and not touching a metal ground before returning to the refueling nozzle and causing a static electricity spark.

In a video of the incident, the man is seen standing in the bed of his pickup as he fills five 5-gallon gas cans (three plastic and two metal) over a period of several minutes before a flash fire erupts.

Lt. Col. Brian Mullin, a former safety officer at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, is seen driving up to an adjacent pump and starting to fill his vehicle when he notices what the man is doing just before the fire.

Mullin, now undergoing instructor pilot training at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, said the retiree "did one of the classic things you shouldn't do ...refueling external gas cans (above ground) with plastic or rubber shoes on.
This is an extremely textbook case of static electricity igniting an instantaneous fire.

"I was moving my lips to tell him, 'Sir, don't do that,' when the first flame started in the back of his truck," added Mullin.

"I saw the flame, and I told him to jump," he said. "He dropped the hose, which sprayed gas all over the truck. I told him to jump and run, which would have been really a good thing to do, but instead, he tried to throw the 5-gallon can that he had just fueled out the back to get it away from his truck, and that started the whole area on fire.

"So now he's on fire, the back of the truck's on fire, and the can that just hit the ground started a big fire behind the truck."

The man ran between the burning truck and the pump toward the store before he dropped and rolled on the pavement.

Mullin ran after the man, ripping off his two T-shirts to beat out the burning clothes, "but they did not do much good because they (caught) on fire," he said.

Jones ran to use his BDU top on the flames, and another man and a woman also helped the retiree.

Firefighters arrived on scene within two minutes and extinguished the blazing truck five minutes after arriving.

Ball said the damage to the AAFES fuel pump was estimated at $10,000 to $15,000 and to the retiree's 1993 Mazda pickup, $2,500. The retiree, who received third-degree burns of his legs below the knees, later was transferred to local Brooke Army Medical Center's burn unit for further treatment.

KirbysLawn
12-13-2002, 07:54 AM
Click below and scroll down to "Gas Pump Fire" for the video.

http://www.cnn.com/video/

Atlantic Lawn
12-14-2002, 07:46 AM
Couldn't find that clip Kirby, I guess they must rotate stories around pretty quick.

lawnworker
12-14-2002, 08:46 AM
What about plastic gas cans filled in the bed with a rubber liner? Is this safe to do? I have done this before. Also, I have filled my containers sitting in my trailer.

KirbysLawn
12-14-2002, 02:48 PM
Originally posted by Atlantic Lawn
Couldn't find that clip Kirby, I guess they must rotate stories around pretty quick.

They moved it, look at the above link and then click on the more videos tab:

Envy Lawn Service
12-14-2002, 09:43 PM
Man :(

I always take my extra cans out of the truck when filing. But usually I try not to use them if I don't absolutely have to. I'd much rather have to make an extra stop at the station than carry around cans of gas.

I have a rubber bed mat as well. I have a plastic 2 stroke mix can and I haul it inside a plastic crate, on top of the rubber bed mat. But I always fill and fuel on the ground. Am I in danger here with the bed mat & plastic can?

Also, I'm always filling the mowers on the trailer and I have to admit I've been guilty of filling a mower in the bed of the truck too!

:dizzy: I had no idea it was dangerous :dizzy:

Brickman
12-15-2002, 03:10 AM
Another very good reason to drive diesel.

Navig8r
12-15-2002, 10:29 PM
I filled a can in the bed of my truck ONCE !!! When I was done, I could feel the hair on my head standing up from the static........ Not much better reminder to FILL CANS ON THE GROUND!
I figure that was my freebie, since I managed not to blow myself up:)
That was about 6 years ago..... I always take cans out and fill on the ground now.

Envy Lawn Service
12-15-2002, 10:37 PM
Originally posted by Envy Lawn Service
Man :(

I always take my extra cans out of the truck when filing. But usually I try not to use them if I don't absolutely have to. I'd much rather have to make an extra stop at the station than carry around cans of gas.

I have a rubber bed mat as well. I have a plastic 2 stroke mix can and I haul it inside a plastic crate, on top of the rubber bed mat. But I always fill and fuel on the ground. Am I in danger here with the bed mat & plastic can?

Also, I'm always filling the mowers on the trailer and I have to admit I've been guilty of filling a mower in the bed of the truck too!

:dizzy: I had no idea it was dangerous :dizzy:


:eek: :blob2: Am I about to be up in flames here or what? :blob2: :eek:

I got shocked a couple of times by the car door today which has reminded me of this. :confused:

GrassCtr
12-15-2002, 10:52 PM
Originally posted by Brickman
Another very good reason to drive diesel.

You must not have read the topic. I have a diesel too but my trimmers, blowers, & mowers use gas, and filling gas cans in the back of trucks was what caused the fire.

bilbo7021
12-16-2002, 12:43 AM
try working at a gas station as a pump jockey and having people look at you funny for insisting on filling cans on the ground. and if it can cause a spark (any spark), it's better on the ground. I couldn't tell you how many times people would pull up, lit cigarette, and fill up or try to fill cans in the back trunk, seat, or bed. for three months I kept wondering if I'd be blown up! oh wait, let's not forget people who pull into gas stations with mufflers dragging. god I was happy to get out of that job.

Brickman
12-16-2002, 01:16 AM
Originally posted by GrassCtr
You must not have read the topic. ..............


I'm not blind.

Lanelle
12-16-2002, 02:15 AM
Wow! This same basic thing happened to my husband last winter. Somehow he managed to not catch himself on fire or blow up anything. But he had a rather odd looking 'hairstyle' for a while. And I had never seen his eyebrows so short. The pump jockey didn't even turn off the pump during the incident. Maybe the bed liner manufacturers should put out a 'warning label' to alert truck owners of the increased risk.

DLCS
12-16-2002, 02:35 AM
Originally posted by Lanelle
Maybe the bed liner manufacturers should put out a 'warning label' to alert truck owners of the increased risk.

The last two bedliners I have bought have a warning label on them about the risk of static and gasoline. I have Duraliners.

This is the warning on Duraliner's website
"WARNING! Never fill gas containers in vehicles or on pickup truck beds! The flow of gasoline through the pump nozzle can produce static electricity which can cause a fire if gasoline is pumped into an ungrounded gasoline container."



Mike
DLCS

Tony Harrell
12-16-2002, 05:47 AM
What about filling mowers and equipment up while on the trailers? Is it just the plastic cans on plastic bedliners or can this be a problem also? The bed of my trailer is metal.

crawdad
12-16-2002, 06:48 AM
Originally posted by Brickman
I'm not blind.
Then what does the fuel requirements of a truck have to do with filling gas cans for mowers, and such? Gas cans can explode in the back of a deisel rig, too.
Crawdad

DLCS
12-16-2002, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by Tony Harrell
What about filling mowers and equipment up while on the trailers? Is it just the plastic cans on plastic bedliners or can this be a problem also? The bed of my trailer is metal.



I have the same questions. Does anybody have a answer? I always thought it was just static created from the plastic can rubbing on a plastic bedliner. I fill my mowers and gas cans on my trailer all the time at the gas stations. I always thought it was safe but not so sure now?


Mike
DLCS

Gravely_Man
12-16-2002, 03:55 PM
You can never be too careful. This topic has come up previously and again people are unaware of the danger in filling gas cans in the bed of the truck. This is one topic that should be brought back up from time to time. Saving a fellow lawn care worker any pain and suffering is a very good thing.


Gravely_Man

Atlantic Lawn
12-16-2002, 04:11 PM
I have never heard of a can or anything cathin' fire in the back of a trailer. I guess thats because most floors are wood. I really don't want to push my luck these days. I have always filled cans on the ground. Now mowers are a different matter, I guess the rubber tires help to prevent the static build up. It sure would be nice if we had the opinion of a Rocket Scientist on this one. There's gotta' be at least one out there in the LCO world.

Envy Lawn Service
12-16-2002, 07:41 PM
Originally posted by Atlantic Lawn
I have never heard of a can or anything cathin' fire in the back of a trailer.

I guess the rubber tires help to prevent the static build up.

It sure would be nice if we had the opinion of a Rocket Scientist on this one.

Hey now, I never heard of the truck fire thing either....

I thought rubber was an insulator? :confused:
Maybe his whole thing is all about plastic, I dunno...

Sure would be nice to know the whole truth of this matter.

HLC
12-17-2002, 09:14 PM
Okay I'm not a rocket scientist but here's my thoughts on filling up on the trailer.
One of the safety tips that we should always adhere to even when filling up our vehicles is to always ground yourself out to the vehicle before grabbing the nozzle (like when you walk away from the vehicle and come back). And this doesn't mean to ground out by grabbing the gas door. Touch the vehicle a few feet away from the nozzle.
Now the same principle should apply to the trailer. If you can touch metal on your trailer, put one hand on the metal (it is electrically the same point as the vehicle since it is connected at the hitch) while dispensing the fuel. This should ground out any static buildup and prevent the spark.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2002, 12:18 AM
For those of us who get "on" the trailer to fill the mower itself...
Should the mower be grounded to the trailer and the trailer to the ground to be safe or what?

Maybe a good chain tacked to the metal on the side of the trailer leaving enough lenght to reach to hook on the mower on one side and enough on the other to throw out on the ground.

:confused:

Don B
12-18-2002, 04:03 PM
Check out this site. http://www.pei.org/news/static.htm#guidelines
It has some info about static.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2002, 04:13 PM
When dispensing gasoline into a container, use only an approved portable container and place it on the ground when refueling to avoid a possible static electricity ignition of fuel vapors. Containers should never be filled while inside a vehicle or its trunk, the bed of a pickup truck or the floor of a trailer.

etwman
12-18-2002, 04:49 PM
We had this tank custom made for our commercial grounds care rig.

(2) 60 gallon transfer tanks with 12v pumps. One for gas and the other for off road diesel. Easily lifts out when empty with quick disconnect wiring harness and lift rings.

etwman
12-18-2002, 05:02 PM
this fuel tank goes along with this

landscaper3
12-18-2002, 05:20 PM
Nice rig! Up here in Maine anything over I belive 20 gallons you need a Hazmat licence.